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Brass Man (Agent Cormac Book 3) by [Asher, Neal]
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Brass Man (Agent Cormac Book 3) Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews
Book 3 of 5 in Agent Cormac (5 Book Series)

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Length: 505 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"Asher has lit up the sky of Science Fiction like a new sun." --Tanith Lee

"""Fizzing with intelligent ideas and occasionally streaked with black humor. Appalling, mind-boggling, fascinating--and irresistible." --"Kirkus", starred review

"Asher's latest novel features fast-paced action, spy vs. spy intrigue, and the guilty pleasure of watching two exceptional and opposed individuals move inexorably toward an inevitable showdown." "--Library Journal"

"Neal Asher has always drummed up a healthy dose of space adventure and wicked fun in his novels and "Brass Man "maintains this reputation effortlessly." --"Interzone""Asher does time travel and he does it damn well, taking the reader on a journey that would make one hell of a theme park ride!" --SFRevu.com"" "Time travel, ultraviolence, big dinosaurs--the perfect mind-blasting SF cocktail." --"SFX" magazine





Asher has lit up the sky of Science Fiction like a new sun. "Tanith Lee"

Fizzing with intelligent ideas and occasionally streaked with black humor. Appalling, mind-boggling, fascinating--and irresistible. "Kirkus, starred review"

Asher's latest novel features fast-paced action, spy vs. spy intrigue, and the guilty pleasure of watching two exceptional and opposed individuals move inexorably toward an inevitable showdown. "Library Journal"

Neal Asher has always drummed up a healthy dose of space adventure and wicked fun in his novels and "Brass Man "maintains this reputation effortlessly. "Interzone"

Asher does time travel and he does it damn well, taking the reader on a journey that would make one hell of a theme park ride! "SFRevu.com"

Time travel, ultraviolence, big dinosaurs--the perfect mind-blasting SF cocktail. "SFX magazine""

Book Description

Another broiling, sprawling, witty, hard-SF adventure, filled with the truly alien

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1295 KB
  • Print Length: 505 pages
  • Publisher: Tor; Reprints edition (21 Aug. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003DWC6P4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #29,469 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Good book.
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Format: Hardcover
Good, but incredibly dense. He's obviously wanted to have the Iain M. Banks style multiple plots running, but unlike Banks, he doesn't quite pull it off. Not enough about Cormac, and not enough about Mr Crane to be quite honest.
There was a lot of digression into stuff that never quite seemed important - the fate of the human colonists - I never really cared that much about them, because they were never really developed as characters. Putting them then in peril didn't really grab me that much.
But some excellent technology, and for the first time he explores the motivations of the various AI denizens of his universe, although the Polity is starting to resemble the Culture quite markedly - not bad thing in some ways, but Banks skirts the border of Deus Ex Machine very closely at times, and not many authors could do that without stepping over the line.
This book is at its best when in the hard science mode - some of the technology ideas are excellent and could be explained even further.
Overall an enjoyable read, but not up to the standard of 'Consider Phlebas', or even Asher's early 'Gridlinked'.
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Format: Paperback
Brass Man continues my reading (and catch-up) of Neal Asher's Ian Cormac series. I'm a big fan of Neal's work and my one reading resolution for this year was to get up-to-date on his releases. I'm in the fortunate position of having the whole series sitting on my shelf ready for back-to-back reads so I can fully appreciate the overall story he's telling, and after recently reading both the second in the series, The Line of Polity, and now Brass Man I'm still gobsmacked that I haven't read them sooner. Brass Man is the third book in the series and picks up the characters following the conclusion of the previous book, with all the headaches that entails for Cormac and company!

After the events of The Line of Polity and the apparent destruction of Skellor and the deadly Jain technology he discovered and used, Masada and all those that were in contact with the technology are quarantined. Jerusalem, the vast AI starship whose sole job it is to monitor, study and restrict Jain technology, is now involved in the clean up from the fall out, but not all is back to normal. When a salvage ship discovers the bridge of the Occam Razor it's clear that Skellor and the Jain tech were not destroyed, and this one find leads events to Cull, to Dragon, and the resurecction of a dangerous brass Golem known as Mr Crane.

Brass Man is very much the second half of the story started in The Line of Polity, and while this is part of a five book series, tLoP and BM feel like a self-contained duology. This is good as there were some interesting things left over from the previous book that cried out for further development.
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Format: Paperback
Another excellent book from Neal Asher. I'd had it a while and only just got round to reading it over hte holidays, so I've forgotten something of the previous stories it's based upon, but that didn't detract at all. The ideas about AI and VR technology and how it will effect human life in the future are intriguing and, for me at least, philosophically sound even if still science fiction. Asher has some strong characters in the excellent Mr. Crane, on whom the book is based and about which the story finally unfolds, Ian Cormac and his team. But I really enjoyed the more "low tech" stories of Anderson and the fantastically imaginative fauna from his world. Dragon also seemed far more plausible than in the past. Really good stuff. Much better put together and easier to read than Cowl. Highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Before I go into the review of this book something has to be said: when choosing a book to read, only an idiot would pick up a later book in a series without having read the earlier ones first. Guess what that makes me?

Keeping the above in mind I think one of the problems that I had with the early part of this novel is the torrent of information I had to absorb. Saying that Asher’s universe is big, does not do it justice it is a masterwork of the imagination - but having to try and come to terms of it was hard going.

This is where not starting at the beginning has an effect. Had I read the first book I am sure everything there would have been a competent lead in to a very well thought out and advanced universe and I would have been able to sail through the books easily. Instead I was thrown in the deep world and had to doggy-paddle as I tried to catch up. Once I had done so though I found myself enjoying the book immensely. Asher has created a universe that is rich in detail and technology that twists the mind with it’s concepts and pure invention. A society ruled my Artificial Intelligences that have as much personality as the humans around them. Humans, if they can be called that, who have the chance to live forever, able to move between bodies, cloned or artificially created things called Golems.

The novel is the home of many characters, but at it’s core there are two characters, Ian Cormac and the titular Brass Man, Mr. Crane.
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