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Boughton: The Immortal Hour Double CD

4.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

Price: £13.98 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Product details

  • Performer: Roderick Kennedy, Patricia Taylor, Anne Dawson, David Wilson-Johnson
  • Orchestra: Mitchell Choir, English Chamber Orchestra
  • Conductor: Alan G. Melville
  • Composer: Rutland Boughton
  • Audio CD (1 Jan. 2000)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Double CD
  • Label: Dyad
  • ASIN: B00000DLYB
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 123,978 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. A wood, dark and mysterious
  2. Dalua (Slowly coming out of the shadow)
  3. Voices in the Wood
  4. Dalua
  5. Dalua
  6. A voice
  7. Dalua Laugh not, ye outcasts of the invisible worlg
  8. Etain Fair is the moonlight
  9. Dalua Hail, daughters of kings, and star among the dreams
  10. Dalua Have you forgeot
  11. Etain I have forgotten all
  12. A king of men
  13. Led here by dreams
  14. I will go back
  15. The horn is heard nearer.
  16. I have come
  17. look, O king!
  18. There is no backward way for such as I
  19. I have heard you calling, Dalua .. dalua
  20. The hut of the peasant, Manus, and his wife
  21. yes, woman, yes I know; for silnce. hush!
  22. But sometimes..sometimes..Tell me; have you heard,
  23. Good folk, I give you greeting
  24. Good sir, you are the most welcome
  25. Manus and Maive withdraw into the shadow; the logs give less flame
  26. Eochaidh Truly I
  27. Etain I, too am lifted with the breath
  28. Eochaidt Who laughed?
  29. Dear lord, sit here. I am weary
  30. How beautiful they are
  31. Druids By the voice in the corries
  32. Maidens the Bell of Youth are ringing in the gateways of the South
  33. Warriors But this was in the old,
  34. Bards, Maidens and Warriors

Disc: 2

  1. Green of fire of Joy, green fire of Life
  2. Etain, speak, my queen
  3. No, no my Queen
  4. I, too, have heard
  5. She gives him her hand
  6. A stir is heard without.
  7. I am a King's first son
  8. Dagda, lord of Thunder and Silence
  9. Fair Lord, my thanks I give. lordship I have.
  10. Have not great poets sung
  11. In th days of the Great fires when the hills were aflame
  12. Hear us. Engus, beautiful, terrible,
  13. But now, fair lord, tell me the boon
  14. He sinks wearily on his seat,
  15. Etain is seen all things pass and all thingsgo
  16. Her eyes wander Midir
  17. Midir takes up the harp that stands by the old minstrel's seat
  18. Etain again puts her hand to her head
  19. I Am a Song
  20. I am a green leaf in a great world
  21. O do not leave me, star of my desire
  22. Hasten, lost love! come Etain, come!
  23. In the Land of youth
  24. In the darkness and unseen by Eochaidh, Dalua

Product Description

The Immortal Hour, opéra / Anne Dawson - Maldwyn Davies - David Wilson-Johnson - Roger Bryson - Patricia Taylor... - Geoffrey Mitchell Choir - English Chamber Orchestra, dir. Alan G. Melville

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
What if Richard Wagner had been quintessentially English? Now there's a thought. Would he have been like Rutland Boughton - nice, sometimes appealing, but rather ineffectual? Or would he still have been a despot and a monster?! On the surface, they had a lot in common. One was a wanted and exiled left-wing revolutionary who later wanted performances at his own theatre reserved for `ordinary working people', the other a committed socialist who wanted his music to be appreciated and be useful to the `working man' (his choral piece, Bethlehem, was first performed in modern dress as an act of solidarity with the miners and with the General Strike of 1926). One founded a Festival and a theatre on a Green Hill in Bavaria, revolutionary in its acoustics and in the works that were to be performed there, the other wanted to found a similar Festival on the Somerset Levels near a Green Hill/Tor at Glastonbury, a grandiose scheme that barely got off the ground. The key work to be performed at the first opera house was a massive 4-evening cycle based on Germanic myths, the key work for the other festival was to be a cycle of 5 operas based on the English Arthurian myths. The one developed the very Germanic theory of `Gesamtkunstwerk', the other the very English theory of `Choral Drama'.

It all leaves one feeling a little underwhelmed by Boughton, despite his ambitions. Yet he wrote the opera that had more consecutive performances than any other serious opera anywhere in the world. That was The Immortal Hour, first produced at his inaugural Glastonbury Festival in 1914 and later to run for 216 consecutive performances in London (+ another run of 160 performances the following year). In its day, it was as popular as a Lloyd Webber musical.
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1 Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
Rutland Boughton is now largely forgotten and rarely performed, but in his day he was one of the best known English composers up there with Elgar and RVW. "The Immortal Hour" is his best known work, and when it came out in the 1920s was amazingly successful. I'm not sure I'd describe it quite as an opera but it certainly has operatic ambitions and serious musical content. But it had a London West End run that many frivolous stage musicals would only envy.

Despite the undoubted quality of its music, it is however very much a product of its time, that tapped somehow into the desire for something more, a striving for some kind of spiritual nirvana after the horrors of WW1. Today the Celtic mysticism of its libretto is, to me at least, obscure, and if I had to watch it on stage would have me looking at my watch after the first half hour or so. But listening to it on CD lets you hear and appreciate something of the music. In all candour though, despite an excellent performance and recording here, I wouldn't rate it more than an intriguing curiosity that hasn't stood the test of time. But it's worth having if, like me, you're interested in exploring some of the lesser known English composers.
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Format: Audio CD
I had never heard of this composer until very recently whilst reading a biogrpahy of Ralph Vaughan Williams, whom Boughton appears to have known well (or at least well enough to have had several arguments about politics with). Reading that like RVW, Boughton was heavily influenced by folk music, I took a chance and got a copy. I can now say it was well worth - a beautiful opera, beautifully played and sung. That's all there is to it.
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A truly inspiring and deeply moving musical journey of opera, choral, and orchestral music, filled with great beauty and sadness. Allow yourself to be transported into Fiona MacLeod's magical vision. This work is a true treasure of Glastonbury and the pride of English opera.
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