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on 14 December 2001
I'm 39 years old now so was a young girl when the film of Born Free was released. I must have been about nine or ten years old when I first read these books after seeing the film at the cinema and they've stayed with me ever since. They opened my eyes to another world and awakened an interested in conservation. They helped changed many peoples attitudes about the purpose of zoos ie: the emphasis now on conservation rather than just places for a day out.
But the overriding memory these books left me with is one of true love and devotion between a human being and a wild animal. These books are a wonderful introduction to the wildlife and wonders of Africa - recommended
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on 15 September 2006
No wildlife lover should be without a copy of this extraordinary (but true!) story. It is split into three parts!

Born Free: Follows the life of Elsa as an orphaned lion cub in Kenya until she grows up and is taught on how to be a wild lion.

Living Free: Follows the life Elsa and her three young cubs.

Forever Free: Elsa tragically dies of an illness and her cubs are taken to the Serengeti in Tanzania to be released into the wild.

All took my breath away as I read about, not just the lives of the lions, but of the people around them.
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on 17 September 2014
Published seven times in 1960, three prints being made in the month of April alone this demonstrates the popularity of this book at the time. It was published at a time when safari package holidays had yet to be invented and the farthest that most English people traveled abroad was to a Spanish coastal holiday resort. Born Free brings directly into your life the African savanna and bush, the wildlife that inhabits it and what it is like to live amongst it. This will account in some measure for the rapturous reception of this book. In addition, and in the main, it will be because of the fact that it recounts an enduring relationship between a human being and an animal; most people, including me, cannot resist a good, high arrh factor animal story such as this.

Born Free, the first of a trilogy, recounts in detail Elsa's early life and her transformation from a helpless lion cub only a few weeks old to a young lioness able to fend for herself in the wild. Even though I knew the story beforehand and I've seen the film decades ago and I'm now a somewhat world-weary cynic of a certain age, it has utterly captured my heart. This book has brought me much joy at the beginning and end of my days, sandwiching my daily stresses with tales of another world at another time.

Joy Adamson's writing is direct and immediate with little lyricism, but this does not detract. It makes the story of her life in the African bush with Elsa highly engaging and accessible.

There is a naivety to Joy Adamson's account of Elsa, which is infectious and somewhat beguiling. In essence Joy lays bare, (and thus made herself vulnerable to criticism) for her readers her undying and unconditional love for Elsa, which some may say was somewhat un-natural, but perhaps understandable for a woman who had had three miscarriages. Joy needed to have a means to release her un-expressed maternal love and Elsa turned up right on cue.

Joy Adamson found it difficult to find a publisher for her book, but when one finally said yes it set off a domino effect: Elsa, the wonderful lion cub and later lioness became known around the world, a film was made of her story, the making of the film had a life changing effect upon the McKenna's who portrayed Joy and George Adamson, resulting in them founding the Born Free charity which continues to this day.

The work of the Adamsons with Elsa in bringing her up from a lion cub, whose mother George had killed with a bullet, to the point of her being able to fend for herself in the wild, is regarded by some as controversial. Personally I take my hat off to them for saving at least one of the three orphaned cubs from a miserable life in a zoo - Elsa's two sisters ended up in Rotterdam zoo. In a sense, one might well think that it was the least they could do. Although Joy makes light of Elsa's sister's incarceration and says that she visited them in Rotterdam and reported that they were both living in excellent conditions, one has to wonder whether in fact she was glossing over the situation, given the state of most zoos at this time - lions in small and barren cages often with their occupants pacing up and down rhythmically. Maybe this is the price that had to be paid for the ultimate founding of the Born Free charity one of whose objectives is to free animals from appalling living conditions in captivity.

One has to remember that she lived the life of a colonialist employing Africans as servants to undertake menial housework, camp preparation and dismantling for her. There is obvious prejudice in her writing, which grates and it is pretty clear that she regarded Africans as inferior. Ultimately, many years later, she was to meet her death by another of her servant's hands because of her attitude towards them. This gripe, in my estimation is not a reason to set this book aside.

For all those that love animals and who wish for escapism you will love this book.
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on 24 December 2016
I've bought this 1960 hardback copy of Born Free for my granddaughter and it has arrived quickly and just in time for Christmas. Very good condition, nice size print for a child to read and lots of black and white photos, one colour photo at the start. I haven't read this book but it is obviously an extremely well known story and I'm sure will be enjoyed by someone who has loved the Lion King since she was very small. Also bought a couple of items from the Born Free charity itself to go with it. Very pleased with my purchase.
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on 9 September 2011
Surprisingly well written! The story of Elsa and her cubs had me in tears almost all the way through (probably because I knew the ending!)
Interesting photographs, which clearly showed the depth of affection this unusual woman had for Elsa.

If I had a complaint, it would be that this edition seemed a little "cheap". The coever was a little more flimsy than other paperbacks.
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on 3 October 2011
Every body over forty knows the story of Elsa, the lioness, this book, containg all three books, is a must for everybody who wants to re read them, and is a great book for children,, the way it is written makes the book come alive,,
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on 1 August 2016
.....if this is the exact copy, I bought this for sentimental reasons, my Granddad owning a copy
I cant believe it, it looks exactly the same
Its a really good book and remember it reducing me to tears in parts just like the films.

Thank you to however had this copy
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on 27 May 2014
I bought this for my Granddaughter who is lion mad. The photographs are black and white (a few coloured) and are beautiful. It is such a touching story of love and conservation.
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on 19 July 2016
Wonderful book about the world's favourite lioness, of considerable personal nostalgia value!
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on 8 May 2016
one of my all time fave books. real tear jerker.
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