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Books and the Parchments Paperback – 1 Feb 1972


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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Distribution Services; New edition edition (Feb. 1972)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0720802164
  • ISBN-13: 978-0720802160
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 10.9 x 1 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,398,452 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Some chapters on the transmission of the Bible.

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Amazon.com: HASH(0x97722108) out of 5 stars 7 reviews
HASH(0x9775b2f4) out of 5 stars A COLLECTION OF ESSAYS AND SPEECHES BY THE FAMED SCHOLAR 12 Aug. 2014
By Steven H Propp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Frederick Fyvie Bruce (1910-1990) was a Biblical scholar who taught at a variety of universities, and was editor of The Evangelical Quarterly and the Palestine Exploration Quarterly. He wrote a number of influential books, such as Jesus and Christian Origins Outside the New Testament, Are the New Testament documents reliable?, New Testament History, The Defense of the Gospel in the New Testament, Second thoughts on the Dead Sea scrolls, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1950 book, "This volume gathers together a number of articles written and papers read at various times on the transmission of the Bible. It is intended for non-specialists like those who have read them or heard them in their earlier forms, and who have frequently expressed a desire to have them in this form... I have tried to bear in mind the questions which are most frequently asked about these matters, and to answer them to the best of my ability. I hope that the volume may thus prove interesting and useful to the many who, without aiming at any specialist knowledge of Biblical learning, would welcome a handbook dealing with these questions."

He points out, "Much of the vivid, concrete and forthright character of our English Old Testament is really a carrying over into English of something of the genius of the Hebrew tongue. Biblical Hebrew does not deal with abstractions but with the facts of experience. It is the right sort of language for the record of the self-revelation of a God who does not make Himself known by philosophical propositions but by controlling and intervening in the course of human history. Hebrew is not afraid to use daring anthropomorphisms when speaking of God. If God imparts to men the knowledge of Himself, he chooses to do so most effectively in terms of human life and human language." (Pg. 45)

He observes, "a writer like Luke... commanded a good, idiomatic Greek style. Even in the English translation it is difficult to miss the transition in style which takes place between the fourth and fifth verses of his Gospel. From the fifth verse of his first chapter to the end of his second chapter we might be reading a continuation of the Old Testament, so reminiscent is the style of his nativity narratives of the characteristic phraseology of the Old Testament. Some scholars have supposed that for these nativity narratives Luke was dependent on a Hebrew document. This is possible---indeed, it seems to the writer more likely---but it is also possible that Luke was simply composing deliberately in `Septuagint' style because he judged that most appropriate for the subject-matter of these two chapters." (Pg. 71)

He notes, "It is sometimes claimed that the criterion which the early Christians applied in deciding whether a book was to be regarded as canonical or not was that of apostolic authorship. Now, it is certain that apostolic authorship counted for very much. It was for this reason that such a flood of apocryphal literature appears in the second century bearing the names of various apostles... And there is no example of a certainly apostolic writing being refused canonical recognition... But apostolic authorship, though an important factor, was not the only ground of canonicity. It is probably a mistake to think that we owe the presence of the Epistle to the Hebrews in our Bibles entirely to the happy accident that it was popularly ascribed to Paul. For, after all, two of the Gospels bear the names of men who were not apostles, and yet that did not stand in the way of accepting Mark and Luke as equally inspired with Matthew and John." (Pg. 110)

Like all collections of diverse essays, this one is admittedly somewhat "uneven." But Bruce's scholarship is of the highest grade as always, and his explanations for a "popular" audience will be of help to many or most persons seriously studying the Bible.
HASH(0x97ec62c0) out of 5 stars A COLLECTION OF ESSAYS AND SPEECHES BY THE FAMED SCHOLAR 12 Aug. 2014
By Steven H Propp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Frederick Fyvie Bruce (1910-1990) was a Biblical scholar who taught at a variety of universities, and was editor of The Evangelical Quarterly and the Palestine Exploration Quarterly. He wrote a number of influential books, such as Jesus and Christian Origins Outside the New Testament, Are the New Testament documents reliable?, New Testament History, The Defense of the Gospel in the New Testament, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1950 book, “This volume gathers together a number of articles written and papers read at various times on the transmission of the Bible. It is intended for non-specialists like those who have read them or heard them in their earlier forms, and who have frequently expressed a desire to have them in this form… I have tried to bear in mind the questions which are most frequently asked about these matters, and to answer them to the best of my ability. I hope that the volume may thus prove interesting and useful to the many who, without aiming at any specialist knowledge of Biblical learning, would welcome a handbook dealing with these questions.”

He points out, “Much of the vivid, concrete and forthright character of our English Old Testament is really a carrying over into English of something of the genius of the Hebrew tongue. Biblical Hebrew does not deal with abstractions but with the facts of experience. It is the right sort of language for the record of the self-revelation of a God who does not make Himself known by philosophical propositions but by controlling and intervening in the course of human history. Hebrew is not afraid to use daring anthropomorphisms when speaking of God. If God imparts to men the knowledge of Himself, he chooses to do so most effectively in terms of human life and human language.” (Pg. 45)

He observes, “a writer like Luke… commanded a good, idiomatic Greek style. Even in the English translation it is difficult to miss the transition in style which takes place between the fourth and fifth verses of his Gospel. From the fifth verse of his first chapter to the end of his second chapter we might be reading a continuation of the Old Testament, so reminiscent is the style of his nativity narratives of the characteristic phraseology of the Old Testament. Some scholars have supposed that for these nativity narratives Luke was dependent on a Hebrew document. This is possible---indeed, it seems to the writer more likely---but it is also possible that Luke was simply composing deliberately in ‘Septuagint’ style because he judged that most appropriate for the subject-matter of these two chapters.” (Pg. 71)

He notes, “It is sometimes claimed that the criterion which the early Christians applied in deciding whether a book was to be regarded as canonical or not was that of apostolic authorship. Now, it is certain that apostolic authorship counted for very much. It was for this reason that such a flood of apocryphal literature appears in the second century bearing the names of various apostles… And there is no example of a certainly apostolic writing being refused canonical recognition… But apostolic authorship, though an important factor, was not the only ground of canonicity. It is probably a mistake to think that we owe the presence of the Epistle to the Hebrews in our Bibles entirely to the happy accident that it was popularly ascribed to Paul. For, after all, two of the Gospels bear the names of men who were not apostles, and yet that did not stand in the way of accepting Mark and Luke as equally inspired with Matthew and John.” (Pg. 110)

Like all collections of diverse essays, this one is admittedly somewhat “uneven.” But Bruce’s scholarship is of the highest grade as always, and his explanations for a “popular” audience will be of help to many or most persons seriously studying the Bible.
HASH(0x97d5648c) out of 5 stars I learned ALOT. 14 Aug. 2014
By Dave - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Very impressive book. I was blown away. Its not the easiest read but you can tell that the author is trying to be as straightforward as possible. Its just that some of the language necessary to convey the information is not common vernacular.
HASH(0x9763509c) out of 5 stars F.F. Bruce's Text is Phenomenal 25 Jan. 2016
By erick g. pryor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you are interesting in textual criticism or are intrigued with authors like Bart Ehrman and James White, this is a great place to look at the practicum involved. I am enjoying the insights that I am gleaning from Bruce's words.
HASH(0x9763503c) out of 5 stars The Books and the Parchments 2 Mar. 2014
By karenp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The author is very knowledgeable and the material is well researched. I was especially interested in the comparisons of the different languages used in the writing of the books of the Bible.
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