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The Bonehunters: Malazan Book Of Fallen 6 (The Malazan Book Of The Fallen) Hardcover – 1 Mar 2006

4.6 out of 5 stars 67 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 912 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Press (1 Mar. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0593046293
  • ISBN-13: 978-0593046296
  • Product Dimensions: 16.4 x 6 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 993,370 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"'This series has clearly established itself as the most significant work of epic fantasy since Stephen R. Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant.'" (SF SITE)

"'Extraordinarily enjoyable...Erikson is a master of lost and forgotten epochs, a weaver of ancient epics.'" (SALON.COM)

"'This is true myth in the making, a drawing upon fantasy to recreate histories and legends as rich as any found within our culture.'" (INTERZONE)

"I stand slack jawed in awe of The Malazan Book of the Fallen. This masterwork of imagination may be the high watermark of epic fantasy." (GLEN COOK, author of The Black Company series)

"Gripping, fast-moving, delightfully dark...Erikson brings a punchy, mesmerizing writing style into the genre of epic fantasy, making an indelible impression. Utterly engrossing." (ELIZABETH HAYDON)

Book Description

The sixth book in Steven Erikson's epic Malazan Book of the Fallen fantasy sequence.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Steven Erikson is the first fantasy writer that, after six installments, seems to be able to escape the pitfall into which numerous others (i.e. and foremost Robert Jordan) have fallen. This is probably due to the fact that he knows where his story is leading and that he does not write anything that substracts from the plot and from the prose needed to unfurl his so intricately woven world, which by the way is one of the most epic and large-scaled fantasy worlds up-to-date, barring perhaps Tolkien's Middle-Earth.
The Bonehunters, now , is a perfect example of two of the best traits Erikson, as a writer, has in store for us. Namely dialogue and convergence. The dialogue is not only very natural it's also extremely witty and an excellent way to transfer meaning. Sarcasm, irony, wit, indeed every feeling ever conveyed, it's all in the dialogue. As for convergence, Erikson is a master of it; within each novel but what's more important, and what becomes especially clear in The Bonehunters, within the overall arc of the entire series. It's not for nothing that part 10 is called The Crippled God!
So is there nothing to remark upon? Well, yes there is, but that particular complaint might cease to exist when the entire series has come to an end and things that now seem to have the aura of a Deus Ex Machina might then be entirely self-explanatory (although the term 'self-explanatory' does not really befit the Malazan Book of the Fallen).
So from me nothing but praise for The Bonehunters and as we are returning to the continent of Lether in the next installment, I'll say "Roll on Reaper's Gale!"
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By B on 25 April 2006
Format: Hardcover
Of course, as is Erickson's wont, there are new characters (most of them introduced in the prologue, but not all).

This is a very catastrophic book. Just like at the end of Book 3. But this one follows that suit throughout. There are major battles that don't turn out so well, and trustful alliances gone awry. The latter, once you get to Seven Cities. Also, the use of propoganda shows its ugly side near the end.

Just about all the characters from Book 4 are back (Karsa, Kalam and QB, Fiddler, Heboric, Cutter, Pearl, etc...). Also, there are Ganoes Paran, Trull Sengar and his Imass friends, and of course, Icarium and Mappo (not just a two second appearance, like in Book 4). Also, this is the book that Shadowthrone is most active in. Something that you've been waiting for one of these characters to do since the beginning of the series finally happens.

As always, there are insights on human nature, and the tendency for war. But in this one, the bulk of these insights are towards the use of the concepts of gods, and what they drive people to do (with many similar tales to things like the crusades).

And finally, there's the one thing that fantasy novels should never go without. A socially conversable demon that also likes to eat people's brains.
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Format: Paperback
What places Erikson at the forefront of the fantasy genre to date, in my opinion, is not just the sheer scale of what he achieves in the most complex plot and character writing I have ever seen, but in the style with which he does it. I am surprised it has yet to be brought to light, but the poetic and philosphical quality with which Erikson infuses his narrative, is simply astounding. Never before have I seen it done with such skill. Simply, there is nothing more tedious than some obscure narrative voice abstractedly droning on about the state of human nature or moral integrity - but what is beautiful with this entire series is the way Erikson employs each character as an entirely unique voice on many enlightening perspectives - many of which contradict themselves as various characters meet certain revelations. The point being is that in doing so Erikson achieves a profound insight into real thought patterns that are affected by the maelstrom of events taking place in the plot - which, as everyone else has asserted, is verging on the incomprehensible, in its quality of craft and scope.
I am intrigued to read some minor criticisms, which I would flatly refute. Yes, 'The Bonehunters' is a transitionary book - but it is also the most pivotal point in the entire series, and as such, the best written. Why? Without giving any plot away, how Erikson interweaves and conjoins disparate plot lines is indicative of immense skill. The Edur's entrance into the Malazan world is not random as the Midnight Tides ends, hinged onto the expansionist intent of the Emperor of Lether - it is one of the many plot lines that I could see coming a mile off. The book also clearly has a plot of its own which is blatantly pointed out in the title (among further sub-plots added to the foray).
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The first half of the book of the fallen series feels very disjointed to myself, and I guess this feeling is shared by other first time readers. The second and third books take place at the same time, the fourth mostly deals with elements only from the second, and the fifth appears to be set earlier than the others, although I'm not sure on that part myself. In the Bonehunters, the various narrative threads which have been floating around have finally begun to pull together, and the plot begins to make sense.
After the anticlimax for the 14th, now called the Bonehunters in the holy desert of Raraku, the remnants of the rebellion are being hunted down. They flee to Y'ghatan, a city with a ominous history for the besieging Malazans. And taking the city will only be the start of the Bonehunters worries. Meanwhile, The indomitable Karsa Orlong is unchained from his loyalties, and is seeking more people to upset and get in fights with. Apsalar is fulfilling the wishes of Cotillion by murdering everyone in sight, Crokus and Heboric charged by L'oric to escort a important personage to safety, Mappo and Icarium are roaming around, one searching for his lost memories, the other doing everything in his power to prevent him finding those memories. Paran is also headed for seven cities, with yet another dodgy plan to orchestrate before he vanishes until the final book of the series. Meanwhile, something is stirring in the imperial warren, and the Empire is having internal issues of it's own.
So, If you have read the first five books, you will probably be quite excited for this one, and rightly so. All the characters that we love are back and roaming around the desert, and not just the ones you would expect.
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