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Blue of Noon (Penguin Modern Classics) Paperback – 7 Jun 2012

3.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (7 Jun. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141195541
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141195544
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 0.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 229,030 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

There's a kind of exhilaration in this - and a kind of terror (Will Self)

About the Author

Georges Bataille, French essayist and novelist, was born in 1897. He converted to Catholicism, then to Marxism, and was interested in psychoanalysis and mysticism. As curator of the municipal library in Orleans, he led a relatviely simple life, although he became involved, usually on the fringes, with the surrealist movement. He founded the literary review Critique in 1946, which he edited until his death in 1962, and was also a founder of the review Documents, which published many of the leading surrealist writers. His writing is a mixture of poetry and philosophy, fantasy and history. His first novel, Story of the Eye, was written under the pseudonym of Lord Auch. Bataille's other works include the novels L'Abbé C and My Mother, and the essays Eroticism and Literature and Evil.


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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This quite a short novel written in 1935. It has Henri Troppman (divorced with 2 kids) having hangups and hangouts with Xenie, Lazare and ‘Dirty’ as the revolutions in Spain and Germany arise. He suggests he is tormented by his necrophiliac desire for his dead mother. He gets ill and needs to be cared for.

I’m sure there is a lot of symbolism and philosophy but the narrative is not really surrealist nor particularly innovative. It is also not 'depraved' or graphically sexual either - this is not what you'd class as erotic.

A couple of quotes:

“She was so oppressively nude”

“The dying man suddenly realises that it’s all over: what will shortly happen, however, is the one thing in the world that ever mattered”

I had expected a bit more and can only go for three stars.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A review by Dr. Joseph Suglia 31 Jan. 2016
By Joseph Suglia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
WHY I CAN'T STAND GEORGES BATAILLE
by Dr. Joseph Suglia

I first discovered Bataille at the age of eighteen. Here was a French Nietzschean who wrote strident essays and excessively explicit novels. What was there not to like? Throughout my eighteenth and nineteenth years, I read the oeuvres of Bataille, alongside the works of Heidegger, Derrida, and many others.

Around the age of twenty, my relationship with Bataille underwent a change. I could no longer stand to read his writings.

La Littérature et le Mal (1957) destroyed my love for Bataille. The book is almost unreadably silly. Bataille argues, with the most incredible casuistry, that literature and evil are the same. Literature evades collective necessity. Evil evades collective necessity. Both literature and evil evade collective necessity. Therefore, literature IS evil. However, this does not seem to imply, according to Bataille, that evil is literature.

This is a bit like saying: A duck is not a zebra. A chicken is not a zebra. Therefore, a duck is a chicken. However, a chicken is not a duck.

"Hegel, la Mort et le Sacrifice" (1955) troubled me, as well. I had read enough of Hegel to know that Bataille was making intellectual errors, was misinterpreting Hegel.

Bataille's misinterpretation of Hegel may be summarized thus: Human beings sacrifice the animal parts of themselves in order to become fully human. Nowhere does this statement appear in the Gesammelte Werke of Hegel. Hegel writes instead: "[Der Geist] gewinnt seine Wahrheit nur, indem er in der absoluten Zerrissenheit sich selbst findet." When Hegel writes that the Spirit finds itself in a state of absolute shreddedness, he means that the human mind exteriorizes itself as an object and restores itself from its self-exteriorization. The human mind is both itself and outside-of-itself at the same time. There is no sacrifice of the animal for the sake of the human.

In L'Érotisme (1957), Bataille argues that death and eroticism issue from the same source, and many of his arguments are unforgettably convincing. But his opening claim is both banal and irrelevant: Bataille contends that the relation between sex and death is apprehensible at the microbiological level: When the ovum is fertilized, it is demolished. The ovum "dies" in order to form the zygote.

This has absolutely nothing to do with the phenomenology of eroticism, nor does it have anything to do with the phenomenology of mortality.

Last month, I read as much as I could endure of the fragments collected in The Unfinished System of Non-Knowledge. These are the incoherent screechings of a lunatic.

* * * * *

According to Georges Bataille's autobiographical note, Le Bleu du ciel ("The Blue of the Sky") was composed in the twilight before the occupation of Vichy France.

The descending night darkens these pages.

Dissolute journalist Henri Troppmann ("Too-Much-Man") and his lover, Dirty give way to every impulse, to every surfacing urge, no matter how vulgar. Careening from one sex-and-death spasm to the next, they deliver themselves over to infinite possibilities of debauchery. A fly drowning in a puddle of whitish fluid (or is it the thought of his mother, a woman he must not desire?) prompts Troppmann to plunge a fork into a woman's supple white thigh. The threat of Nazi terror incites a coupling in a boneyard.

Their only desire is to besmirch whatever is elevated, to vulgarize the holy, to pollute it, to corrupt it, to bring it down into the mud.

By muddying whatever is "sacred," they maintain the force of "the sacred."

As a historical document, Le Bleu du ciel is eminently interesting. It offers unforgettably vivid portraits of Colette Peignot (as Dirty) and the "red nun" Simone Weil (as Lazare).

It is also the story of a man who is fascinated with fascism and the phallus, of someone who loves war, although not for teleological reasons. It is the story of a man who celebrates war on its own terms, who nihilistically affirms its limitless power of destruction.

As the night materializes, the blue of the sky disappears.

Dr. Joseph Suglia
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars 27 Jan. 2016
By Justin Black - Published on Amazon.com
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