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Blockbusters: Why Big Hits - and Big Risks - are the Future of the Entertainment Business by [Elberse, Anita]
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Blockbusters: Why Big Hits - and Big Risks - are the Future of the Entertainment Business Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Review

"Good books merit a second reading--"Blockbusters "merits at least three. First, read it for fun. Anita Elberse describes the history of how blockbuster products and star entertainers were built. If you've ever read arguments about whether leaders are made or born, you'll love this. Then read it again for Elberse's model, which explains the process by which hits and stars are made. This will make you feel like Columbus discovering a world that has long existed but few have seen. Then read it a third time, using her model to understand how other stars - leaders in politics, business and academia, for starters - often can be built in the same way. There is hope - because the world truly is entertaining." Blockbusters "is a delightful, thought-provoking book." --Clayton Christensen, author of "The Innovator's Dilemma"

"A compelling answer for those who wonder why Hollywood seems obsessed with superheroes and all hit songs sound alike. The formula works. . . [In "Blockbusters", ] Elberse delivers an accessible, convincing accounting for the ways in which contemporary entertainment is produced, marketed and consumed."--"Kirkus Reviews"

"Good books merit a second reading--"Blockbusters "merits at least three. First, read it for fun. Anita Elberse describes the history of how blockbuster products and star entertainers were built. If you've ever read arguments about whether leaders are made or born, you'll love this. Then read it again for Elberse's model, which explains the process by which hits and stars are made. This will make you feel like Columbus discovering a world that has long existed but few have seen. Then read it a third time, using her model to understand how other stars - leaders in politics, business and academia, for starters - often can be built in the same way. There is hope - because the world truly is entertaining." Blockbusters "is a delightful, thought-provoking book." --Clayton Christensen, author of "The Innovator's Dilemma"

"How come so many movies are sequels, adaptations and reboots? Why do music studios spend so much on just a handful of superstar artists? And since when did TV shows become so lush and sophisticated? . . . [Elberse's] great new book, "Blockbusters," explains that the . . . questions share one answer. The blockbuster strategy--betting more and more money on fewer and fewer titles--has taken over the entertainment world."--TheAtlantic.com

"Forceful . . . Elberse analyzes the realm of culture with a rigorous, numbers-driven approach."--"The Boston Globe"

"Persuasive... Elberse's research has now culminated in the publication of her first book, "Blockbusters," in which she makes a bold...case against fiscal timidity in the entertainment industry."--"Bloomberg Businessweek"

""Blockbusters "demonstrates that [a blockbuster] strategy usually beats the more cautious approach of spreading around lower-amount investments in a larger number of projects, a recipe for mediocrity that seldom captures the public's imagination."--"Forbes"

"In her new book "Blockbusters" ...[Elberse] argues quite convincingly that in the music industry (in addition to cinema, television, books, and more) record labels are most profitable when they focus their funds on a small number of big-shot, can't-miss juggernauts."--"Billboard"

"As "Blockbusters" reveals, pursuing projects with high risk and high reward is actually the best long-term business model."--Omnivoracious.com

"Fortunate readers of the book are claiming that Anita Elberse's "Blockbusters" is a compelling answer to those wondering why Hollywood seems obsessed with superheroes. Her book merits, not one, two, but three readings."--SciFied.com

"A compelling answer for those who wonder why Hollywood seems obsessed with superheroes and all hit songs sound alike. The formula works. . . [In "Blockbusters," ] Elberse delivers an accessible, convincing accounting for the ways in which contemporary entertainment is produced, mark

*** One of Amazon's Best Books of 2013 ****** One of "The Globe and Mail"'s Best Business Books of 2013 ***

"How come so many movies are sequels, adaptations and reboots? Why do music studios spend so much on just a handful of superstar artists? And since when did TV shows become so lush and sophisticated? . . . [Elberse's] great new book, "Blockbusters," explains that the . . . questions share one answer. The blockbuster strategy--betting more and more money on fewer and fewer titles--has taken over the entertainment world."--TheAtlantic.com

"In her new book "Blockbusters" ...[Elberse] argues quite convincingly that in the music industry (in addition to cinema, television, books, and more) record labels are most profitable when they focus their funds on a small number of big-shot, can't-miss juggernauts."--"Billboard"

"Forceful . . . Elberse analyzes the realm of culture with a rigorous, numbers-driven approach."--"The Boston Globe"

"Persuasive... Elberse's research has now culminated in the publication of her first book, "Blockbusters," in which she makes a bold...case against fiscal timidity in the entertainment industry."--"Bloomberg Businessweek"

"Convincing... Elberse's Blockbusters builds on her already impressive academic resume to create an accessible and entertaining book."--"Financial Times"

""Blockbusters "demonstrates that [a blockbuster] strategy usually beats the more cautious approach of spreading around lower-amount investments in a larger number of projects, a recipe for mediocrity that seldom captures the public's imagination."--"Forbes"

"A compelling answer for those who wonder why Hollywood seems obsessed with superheroes and all hit songs sound alike. The formula works. . . [In "Blockbusters," ] Elberse delivers an accessible, convincing accounting for the ways in which contemporary entertainment is produced, marketed and consumed."--"Kirkus Reviews"

"As "Blockbusters" reveals, pursuing projects with high risk and high reward is actually the best long-term business model."--Omnivoracious.com

"The book effectively explains the paradox of why more entertainment channels result in fewer choices, and offers a welcome respite from the usual business titles."--"Publishers Weekly"

"Fortunate readers of the book are claiming that Anita Elberse's "Blockbusters" is a compelling answer to those wondering why Hollywood seems obsessed with superheroes. Her book merits, not one, two, but three readings."--SciFied.com

"In "Blockbusters," Anita Elberse... argues that the blockbuster strategy--a broad formula that assumes investing in big potential winners will account for a disproportionate share of returns--now governs consumer markets, from restaurants and hotels to electronics." --"The Wall Street Journal"

"Good books merit a second reading--"Blockbusters "merits at least three. First, read it for fun. Anita Elberse describes the history of how blockbuster products and star entertainers were built. If you've ever read arguments about whether leaders are made or born, you'll love this. Then read it again for Elberse's model, which explains the process by which hits and stars are made. This will make you feel like Columbus discovering a world that has long existed but few have seen. Then read it a third time, using her model to understand how other stars - leaders in politics, business and academia, for starters - often can be built in the same way. There is hope - because the world truly is entertaining." Blockbusters "is a delightful, thought-provoking book."--Clayton Christensen, author of "The Innovator's Dilemma"

How come so many movies are sequels, adaptations and reboots? Why do music studios spend so much on just a handful of superstar artists? And since when did TV shows become so lush and sophisticated? . . . [Elberse's] great new book, "Blockbusters," explains that the . . . questions share one answer. The blockbuster strategy--betting more and more money on fewer and fewer titles--has taken over the entertainment world. "TheAtlantic.com"

In her new book "Blockbusters" [Elberse] argues quite convincingly that in the music industry (in addition to cinema, television, books, and more) record labels are most profitable when they focus their funds on a small number of big-shot, can't-miss juggernauts. "Billboard"

Forceful . . . Elberse analyzes the realm of culture with a rigorous, numbers-driven approach. "The Boston Globe"

Persuasive Elberse's research has now culminated in the publication of her first book, "Blockbusters," in which she makes a bold case against fiscal timidity in the entertainment industry. "Bloomberg Businessweek"

Convincing Elberse's Blockbusters builds on her already impressive academic resume to create an accessible and entertaining book. "Financial Times"

"Blockbusters "demonstrates that [a blockbuster] strategy usually beats the more cautious approach of spreading around lower-amount investments in a larger number of projects, a recipe for mediocrity that seldom captures the public's imagination. "Forbes"

A compelling answer for those who wonder why Hollywood seems obsessed with superheroes and all hit songs sound alike. The formula works. . . [In "Blockbusters," ] Elberse delivers an accessible, convincing accounting for the ways in which contemporary entertainment is produced, marketed and consumed. "Kirkus Reviews"

As "Blockbusters" reveals, pursuing projects with high risk and high reward is actually the best long-term business model. "Omnivoracious.com"

The book effectively explains the paradox of why more entertainment channels result in fewer choices, and offers a welcome respite from the usual business titles. "Publishers Weekly"

Fortunate readers of the book are claiming that Anita Elberse's "Blockbusters" is a compelling answer to those wondering why Hollywood seems obsessed with superheroes. Her book merits, not one, two, but three readings. "SciFied.com"

In "Blockbusters," Anita Elberse argues that the blockbuster strategy--a broad formula that assumes investing in big potential winners will account for a disproportionate share of returns--now governs consumer markets, from restaurants and hotels to electronics. "The Wall Street Journal"

Good books merit a second reading--"Blockbusters "merits at least three. First, read it for fun. Anita Elberse describes the history of how blockbuster products and star entertainers were built. If you've ever read arguments about whether leaders are made or born, you'll love this. Then read it again for Elberse's model, which explains the process by which hits and stars are made. This will make you feel like Columbus discovering a world that has long existed but few have seen. Then read it a third time, using her model to understand how other stars leaders in politics, business and academia, for starters often can be built in the same way. There is hope because the world truly is entertaining." Blockbusters "is a delightful, thought-provoking book. "Clayton Christensen, author of The Innovator's Dilemma""

Book Description

Blockbusters is Anita Elberse's fascinating and insightful examination of why the future of popular culture will revolve around ever bigger bets on entertainment products.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1678 KB
  • Print Length: 321 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0805094334
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (16 Oct. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00E78HF9K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #279,994 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you're the sort of person who sees only one movie a year, that movie is unlikely to be Dersu Uzala.

If you are a movie executive that piece of learning ought not to seem radical or new. It certainly isn't a function of the information revolution, and would have been as true when Derzu Uzala was released in 1976 as it is today. Yet it is the intellectual cornerstone of Anita Elberse's provocative new book "Blockbusters" which, while dismantling the New-Age canard of the Long Tail is otherwise far less overwhelming than the commentariat seems to believe.

The blockbuster hook is simple: if you are a global media conglomerate like Warner Brothers or Real Madrid, you are better betting the farm on a small number of "blockbuster" projects than diversifying your resources and "managing for margins" a portfolio of smaller projects. Elberse compares Warner, who did this, which NBC TV, who did not, and reaches her conclusion.

Her false premise is to suppose that, in plumping for yet another Harry Potter movie, Warner Brothers really is "risking big". As a matter of fact, it isn't. It is goosing its scale, but risking small: the five films on its annual slate will all be totally formulaic (those that are not remakes or sequels are in tried-and-true genres), will rely on well-established stars and directors, and will deploy immense production resources to deliver superficial fireworks without challenging norms or demanding any great commitment from viewers.

Warner targets precisely the sort of person who sees only one - or five - movies a year, because that's how many it makes.
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Excellent and very informative book showing why the entertainment business is such a big earner, but also so difficult to break into. Well researched and excellent examples and interviews. Would be great for anyone studying media and the entertainment industry.
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I found Blockbusters really interesting. Anita Elberse backs up her very strong recommendations with data and research. If you are involved with marketing launch strategies, you'll enjoy it. In many ways, the book is also about "content" strategies, but gets into more detail than much of the buzz on content marketing around right now. This is a unique book - in the sense that I haven't read any other book that tackles blockbuster strategies in this way. I'd strongly recommend it.
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I liked how much research went into this book and how many examples, which is always great when being presented with a new statergy or fact,
I reccomend it as one of the tools to expand the business mind.
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Having worked in the industry for 25 years, this an amateurish and really rather boring analysis of what makes a hit a hit.
This book is NOT a hit!
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