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The Blind Man of Seville by [Wilson, Robert]
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The Blind Man of Seville Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews

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Length: 448 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

Amazon.co.uk Review

The very title The Blind Man of Seville raises some of the most interesting questions in this original thriller, which breaks the mould of the police procedural far more than seems likely in its seemingly conventional early pages.

A series of men and women are killed by torture and their eye-lids or eyes taken from them in the process--but they die if anything of an excess of sight, of being forced to watch the unendurable. As Inspector Falcon does the legwork of the case, and gets more and more teasing messages about sight and light from the ingenious and vicious killer, we find ourselves wondering whether he himself is the blind man, if there is something he is refusing to see.

At the same time, he is clearing the studio of his dead painter father, and reading journals containing a horribly plausible version of the man he thought he knew--a bisexual gangster who fought for Fascism and the Nazis in Spain and Russia. And around him Seville is having its intense and bizarre Holy Week celebrations, with bullfights and with vast puppets of sacred figures looming around the streets.

This is a book of surreal intensity which plays by all the rules of the detective novel and yet gives the reader so much disturbingly more. --Roz Kaveney

Amazon Review

The very title The Blind Man of Seville raises some of the most interesting questions in this original thriller, which breaks the mould of the police procedural far more than seems likely in its seemingly conventional early pages.

A series of men and women are killed by torture and their eye-lids or eyes taken from them in the process--but they die if anything of an excess of sight, of being forced to watch the unendurable. As Inspector Falcon does the legwork of the case, and gets more and more teasing messages about sight and light from the ingenious and vicious killer, we find ourselves wondering whether he himself is the blind man, if there is something he is refusing to see.

At the same time, he is clearing the studio of his dead painter father, and reading journals containing a horribly plausible version of the man he thought he knew--a bisexual gangster who fought for Fascism and the Nazis in Spain and Russia. And around him Seville is having its intense and bizarre Holy Week celebrations, with bullfights and with vast puppets of sacred figures looming around the streets.

This is a book of surreal intensity which plays by all the rules of the detective novel and yet gives the reader so much disturbingly more. --Roz Kaveney


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3745 KB
  • Print Length: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Harper (24 Jun. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0046A9MQI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #23,917 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this book a little long and the plot, while ingenious, quite difficult to follow - but that is more my problem!! Perhaps the English translation could have been better.
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Format: Paperback
This is an unusual thriller. It's set in an evocative, painstakingly drawn Spanish milieu (barely a Brit or American in sight). The plot is complex - pleasingly so, to my mind, with some outstanding twists. Many of the incidental characters are excellently developed. Set against this, the first 400 pages are slow, at times maddeningly so; and the climax, when it comes, is rather a damp squib. I also found the central character just a bit too stereotypically angst-ridden, even for a homicide detective. All in all, it's just about enough to make me try another Robert Wilson, but I'd look for one with a stronger central story.

Upside: intriguing setting, well-written. Downside: feels rather long.
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Format: Paperback
This novel by the award-winning author of A Small Death in Lisbon, appears to have much going for it. The first draw is its rather curious title, the second is its exotic setting, Seville, Spain. Plus, the plot itself sounds rather fascinating…
Thursday 12th of April, and a leading restaurateur is found slain in his home. Tied to a chair in front his TV, he has been forced to view horrifically unendurable images. The horror of these scenes is evidenced by the self-inflicted wounds caused by Raul Jimenez’s desperate struggle not to watch. On top of that, his eyelids have been removed. The normally dispassionate detective Javier Falcon is shocked deeply, and becomes inexplicably frightened by this killer who seems to know, intimately, every single detail of his victim’s life. Never in his career has he confronted a scene so barbaric.
But, for Javier Falcon, the worst is yet to come. Because, in investigating the victim’s complex past, he discovers that it is inextricably connected with that of his own father, world-famous artist Francisco Falcon. The case eventually becomes not just a hunt for a killer clearly prepared to strike again, but a voyage of discovery for Falcon as he, through Francisco’s previously hidden journals, learns much about his father’s past and the dark secrets it hides…
This story, told through the dual narratives of fascinating diary extracts and standard third-person narration, is told expertly. Even though the first hundred pages or so grow slightly dull at times, and it takes a while to settle all the numerous characters in your mind, the pace soon picks up as we learn that the case has as much to do with the past as it does the present.
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Format: Hardcover
This is the first Robert Wilson novel I have read - and I am so impressed with the talent of this author.
What on the surface appears to be a run of the mill detective-hunts-psycho-killer novel , becomes something different, evocative, compelling, beautiful.
The book begins with a particularly savage murder, which homicide detective Javier Falcon is brought in to investigate. He finds that the murder ignites something within him, when he discovers that the murdered man was in Tangiers during the 40s & 50s when his own father (a respected painter) was in the city too.
What unravels is a deep tortuous look at his own family and past, where discomforting truths are revealed and Falcon has to re-assess who he really is....
This book will haunt you long after you finish it - yes the murder is brutal and there are scenes and perversions that may be upsetting to some - but it really makes you use that little bundle of grey cells you have. What do we base our lives upon? If everything that we come to believe in turns out to be false, where does that leave us? Do we truly know our own parents? or do we just accept the facet of their lives that they choose to show to us?
This wonderful introspection, complete with the evocative descriptions of life in Seville - makes this a cut above ordinary crime thrillers and a gem of a book just waiting to be found - if, of course, you dare enter.....
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book because I love detective thrillers and SEVILLE. Disappointing because overlong. Story about a good cop who as he investigates a series of murders learns as much about himself and his family's past as he does about the killer. Too ambitious a novel, well written, knows Seville well but not good enough to just list streets. Enjoyed family life eg. Brothers preparing for family meal with the famous jamon. Bull fighting episode rang true but not necessary to plot. Background of Civil War and North Africa very interesting and more plausible than plot since murders are fancible and convoluted, verging on the realms of fantasy.This is not an uplifting book, produced very mixed feelings since it could not be discribed as enjoyable but I did want to finish it despite its dark tone
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Format: Paperback
I came across this book by chance and enjoyed it a lot - that is, as far as formatted thrillers go. The story is composed of a few threads that will, as everyone knows, all bind together and form a clear picture. The author is a seasoned writer and it shows. In the beginning I was almost tempted to speed read the main protagonist's father's letters. Big mistake if I would have done this, for therein lies some of Mr Wilson's best storytelling. The pages of italics were a turn-off. In the end a great tale that left me wondering how many more of this type of books I will read in my lifetime. There must be more to fiction than this, but it helped pass a rainy weekend, so thanks for that.
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