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Blender Game Engine: Beginner's Guide Paperback – 24 Sep 2012

3.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 206 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (24 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849517029
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849517027
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 1.2 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,743,071 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Victor kuller bacone

Victor Kuller Bacone is the pen name for a Blender enthusiast of six years. By profession, he is a video editor, but the explosion of current technologies has led him to learn 3D software, and he chose Blender out of them all.

In the short span of his career within the Blender community in Catalonia (Spain), Victor has promoted Blender events, master classes, and an online magazine under the name Blendercat (http://www.blendercat.org) for anyone who wants to learn 3D using free software. His great admiration for the animation and interactive side of Blender is combined with his passion for games, and more specifically, the ease with which one can create games using Blender. He holds a Masters degree in Computer Science, and teaches both young and unemployed adults.


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Format: Paperback
People who have used earlier versions of Blender from, say, 5 years or more ago, will notice that the user interface for developing a game is vastly enhanced. Much more sophisticated, with far more options for animating objects. But given that the book is aimed at the beginner, if that is indeed you, then you might not fully appreciate the degree to which the Blender game engine has been built out.

A quick and simple way to see the power of the engine is to skim over the screen captures in the text. Like in chapter 4, where you can see how it lets you quickly connect keyboard actions ('accelerators') to motions of objects in the 3 dimensional game you are making. That particular chapter is also important for it is devoted to the topic of collisions. This is basic to most games. You need to quickly find out if a moving object will collide with another object, and then to code what the result of that interaction will be.

Chapter 4 includes a simulation of gravity, which you might likely need in any game that emulates real world conditions. What the chapter shows is that collisions and including gravity are already functionalities largely embedded in the game engine. You get simple default behaviours out of the box, so to speak. Though of course the chapter remarks that the point of your particular game might be a custom coding of what happens during a collision.

But thumbing through the book, as suggested above, might also show that the renderings of the single game example chosen in the book are rather chunky. They look like low resolution images from a 1980s video game, if you hail from that background. Blender is capable of much more detailed images. Keep in mind that the game example was chosen for its simple pedagogic nature. Put alternately, the text gives you incentive to come up with better more intricate imagery.
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Format: Paperback
My first impressions of the book were a bit disappointing because in some sections of the book the language feels awkward and too many times we are told that things are easy and while his might be true, the reader surely can discover this for himself without being told so time and again by the author.
But, overall it is a good book to start working with Blender's game engine. It does cover most issues to create a complete game, including user interaction, animations, collisions, multiple levels, splash screens and creating a stand alone executable. You name it and it is covered.
The approach is consistently step by step and guarantees you will get to a working game, however the chosen game motive, moving a whale around in a sea of icebergs, may not satisfy your expectations if your idea of a game is a fast paced first person action shooter.
Of course an entry level book cannot possibly cover everything, but I would have liked to see some more on creating low poly game assets, creating somewhat intelligent opponents or even some alternative game scenarios. Now it just feels a little bit shallow.
But don't get me wrong, if you have a some game idea this book will not only get you started in realizing that idea but it will probably help you to get it completed. And creating a real working game based on your own ideas that other people can actually play, is very rewarding.
At the current price I reckon the e-book to be a good buy.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8e94dcb4) out of 5 stars 9 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8e7a0870) out of 5 stars What the hell? 28 Dec. 2012
By Alan Garza - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
For it's content, it's not bad. But as compared to the standard of other Blender tutorial books and websites, "What the hell?" Game designers alpha and beta test their games. Why couldn't you do it with the book.

Fix the assets that weren't properly prepared.
Include necessary steps that might not be so obvious to someone new to the BGE.
And most importantly, put the steps in the proper order.

How hard is that? They're all easy fixes with a minimum of extra text. Take a week and turn this from a mediocre text and turn it into a great book. It's so close!!!

For experienced Blender users, this book is easy to use and there's a lot to learn.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f45c114) out of 5 stars Disappointing 8 Jan. 2013
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I received a book to review, "Blender Game Engine : Beginner's Guide", by Victor Kuller Bacone from Packt Publishing. Victor goes by handle Blendercat on the web[...]

I was excited to see this book since there's so little on the subject. Once upon a time, I played with the Blender Game Engine (BGE) a little, but that was quite some time ago. I have heard of many improvements in the BGE since then. I thought this would be a great chance to finally learn about the BGE and all the fun things I've heard are possible with it.

I'm a long time Blender user, but still consider myself an advanced newbie. I've fooled around with the game engine in past, but I mostly use the 3D modeling tools and the video sequence editor. I've been working on some video animation commercial ideas for small business advertising, and have wondered about using the BGE for interactive versions.

Overall, I was quite disappointed with the book. Victor may be a very skilled Blender artist and game developer, but I just couldn't get that from the book. The main problem was the translation. The book needed an editing pass from someone whose first language was English, who knows Blender, and would step through the examples. The English was stilted but usually understandable. Not bad for someone's second language, but I often had to backtrack and re-read sections. Sometimes I could piece together the intent with the aid of the diagrams, but other times, I never got the section's code to work. I don't think that's good for a beginning level book.

I thought I might have had a different version of Blender, but the book never specifies one. Screenshots seem to show versions 2.60, 2.62, and 2.63 being used. I would have liked to have seen each chapters sample code, but I could not find any at Packt's website. With sample code, I might have been able to backtrack to see what I missed or where I went wrong. At the very least, I could start the next chapter with working code.

The book's chapters are divided into a series of sections, 'Time for action', 'What just happened?', and 'Have a go hero', with an occasional 'Pop Quiz' thrown in. My problem in much of the book was that it turned into "what the heck was supposed to have happen there?" and I didn't feel the slightest bit prepared for the "have a go" challenges. The cheering on that the book did got old, very quick.

To try to be fair, I did learn things about the BGE. But for a "Beginner's Guide", there was too much struggle and guesswork for the results I had. From some of the other reviews here, I wonder if I read the same book.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8e78bf0c) out of 5 stars collisions and gravity built in 1 Nov. 2012
By W Boudville - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
People who have used earlier versions of Blender from, say, 5 years or more ago, will notice that the user interface for developing a game is vastly enhanced. Much more sophisticated, with far more options for animating objects. But given that the book is aimed at the beginner, if that is indeed you, then you might not fully appreciate the degree to which the Blender game engine has been built out.

A quick and simple way to see the power of the engine is to skim over the screen captures in the text. Like in chapter 4, where you can see how it lets you quickly connect keyboard actions ('accelerators') to motions of objects in the 3 dimensional game you are making. That particular chapter is also important for it is devoted to the topic of collisions. This is basic to most games. You need to quickly find out if a moving object will collide with another object, and then to code what the result of that interaction will be.

Chapter 4 includes a simulation of gravity, which you might likely need in any game that emulates real world conditions. What the chapter shows is that collisions and including gravity are already functionalities largely embedded in the game engine. You get simple default behaviours out of the box, so to speak. Though of course the chapter remarks that the point of your particular game might be a custom coding of what happens during a collision.

But thumbing through the book, as suggested above, might also show that the renderings of the single game example chosen in the book are rather chunky. They look like low resolution images from a 1980s video game, if you hail from that background. Blender is capable of much more detailed images. Keep in mind that the game example was chosen for its simple pedagogic nature. Put alternately, the text gives you incentive to come up with better more intricate imagery.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8fa36b64) out of 5 stars Quite ok 11 Oct. 2012
By M. J. Anders - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
My first impressions of the book were a bit disappointing because in some sections of the book the language feels awkward and too many times we are told that things are easy and while his might be true, the reader surely can discover this for himself without being told so time and again by the author.
But, overall it is a good book to start working with Blender's game engine. It does cover most issues to create a complete game, including user interaction, animations, collisions, multiple levels, splash screens and creating a stand alone executable. You name it and it is covered.
The approach is consistently step by step and guarantees you will get to a working game, however the chosen game motive, moving a whale around in a sea of icebergs, may not satisfy your expectations if your idea of a game is a fast paced first person action shooter.
Of course an entry level book cannot possibly cover everything, but I would have liked to see some more on creating low poly game assets, creating somewhat intelligent opponents or even some alternative game scenarios. Now it just feels a little bit shallow.
But don't get me wrong, if you have a some game idea this book will not only get you started in realizing that idea but it will probably help you to get it completed. And creating a real working game based on your own ideas that other people can actually play, is very rewarding.
At the current price I reckon the e-book to be a good buy.
HASH(0x8e901ea0) out of 5 stars ... through the first few chapters and this book is great. I've been able to find all of the ... 12 Jan. 2016
By Merril W. Thompson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've only been through the first few chapters and this book is great. I've been able to find all of the resource needed for the projects, but I do recommend getting to know Blender first; this book does not detail each step so knowing the basic helps.
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