Black+Sunday+Dual+Format+... has been added to your Basket

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Black Sunday Dual Format [DVD + Blu-ray] [1960]

4.5 out of 5 stars 55 customer reviews

Price: £11.75 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Promotion Message Promotion Available 1 Promotion(s)

Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
31 new from £10.22 2 used from £9.49 1 collectible from £24.08

Amazon Instant Video

Watch Mask of Satan instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on Blu-ray from LOVEFiLM By Post
£11.75 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase a DVD or Blu-ray offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 GMT on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 Here's how (terms and conditions apply)
  • Note: Blu-ray discs are in a high definition format and need to be played on a Blu-ray player.

  • Important Information on Firmware Updates: Having trouble with your Blu-ray disc player? Will certain discs just not play? You may need to update the firmware inside your player. Click here to learn more.


Frequently Bought Together

  • Black Sunday Dual Format [DVD + Blu-ray] [1960]
  • +
  • Black Sabbath [Blu-ray]
  • +
  • Baron Blood [Blu-ray]
Total price: £36.68
Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video


Product details

  • Actors: Barbara Steele, John Richardson, Andrea Checchi
  • Directors: Mario Bava
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English, Italian
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Arrow Video
  • DVD Release Date: 4 Feb. 2013
  • Run Time: 87 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B009WU5YVE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 14,185 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

STARE INTO THESE EYES... discover deep within them the unspeakable terrifying secret of BLACK SUNDAY... it will paralyze you with fright!

Legendary Scream Queen Barbara Steele (Shivers, Caged Heat) stars in this classic slice of gothic terror from the father of fantastic Italian cinema Mario Bava (Lisa & the Devil).

A beautiful witch is sentenced to death for her evil deeds by her own brother, condemned to die by having a metal mask hammered onto her face before being burnt at the stake. As she passes, she puts a terrible curse on all her future descendants as the spikes of the death mask pierce her flesh... But when two unwitting travellers discover her final resting place and worse, drip blood on her resting corpse, they unleash her once again in all her stunningly beautiful, terrifying glory....

Banned in the UK on its release, Black Sunday is a groundbreaking film that opened the door for Spaghetti horror in all its gory glory.

    SPECIAL FEATURES
  • High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation of two versions of the film; The Mask of Satan the European version with score by Roberto Nicolosi; Black Sunday the re-edited and re-dubbed AIP version with Les Baxter score, on home video for the first time
  • Three audio versions: Optional Italian, European English and AIP English re-dub and re-score
  • English SDH subtitles for both English versions and a new English subtitle translation of the Italian audio
  • Audio Commentary with Bava biographer and expert Tim Lucas
  • Introduction to the film by author and critic Alan Jones
  • Interview with star and horror icon Barbara Steele
  • Deleted Scene from the Italian version with notes by Tim Lucas
  • International Trailer
  • US Trailer
  • Italian Trailer
  • TV Spot
  • I Vampiri (1956) Italy s first sound horror film directed by Riccardo Freda and Mario Bava
  • US I Vampiri Trailer The Devil s Commandment
  • Trailer reel trailers of all the major works by Mario Bava including rarities from the early part of his career
  • Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Graham Humphreys
  • Collector s booklet featuring new writing on the films by Matt Bailey and Alan Jones, illustrated with original archive stills and posters

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
After the slight debacle of the Arrow release of Zombie Flesh Eaters (which was missing a six second shot of a boat in a harbour directly after the opening credits) I was hoping that Arrow would bounce back with this release with no such mishaps.
I'm delighted to report that this release has surpassed my wildest dreams in terms of quality.
I bought the slipcased version direct from Arrow's internet site and it arrived very quickly (within 3 days).
With it's four different sleeves and superb booklet this was almost a winner before I had slipped the disc (one of three in the package) into the Blu Ray player.
What won me over initially was that American version ("Black Sunday") is included as well as "I Vampiri". Add to that Bava's original vision in the form of "The Mask Of Satan" and you really do have the most complete and best package of this film available anywhere in the World.
The picture quality is truly outstanding. I have seen this film in it's various guises at least 20 times and this is the best it's ever looked.
Arrow may have made mistakes in the past with it's pressings of "The Beyond" (now corrected) and ZFE but I'm happy to say that this is one of the best genre discs ever released by any company in the World that I have seen.
Highly recommended.
Comment 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
This 1960 film by the great Italian horror director Mario Bava stands out as a dark jewel of supernatural terror and also generated a distinct sub-genre with films such as the wondrous 'Horror Hotel/City of the Dead' and 'Witchcraft' following in its wake: Mario Bava was a lover of 19th century Russian literature and here we have his unique adaptation of a story by Gogol, a ravishing tale of vampirism, satanic evil and undead witches in the mist-wrapped environs of old Moldavia. Where this film really wins is in its evocation of a wonderfully crepuscular atmosphere of gothic romanticism and what the poet Shelley called 'the tempestuous loveliness of terror', embodied to perfection in the sinister beauty of Princess Asa, played brilliantly by Barbara Steele. We are taken from the pyres of the 17th century presided over by hooded inquisitors to coach-rides through silhouetted forests of clawing branches, flickering with shadows and wraith-like coils of mist-vapour, ruinous tombs and dark castle chambers, howling dogs, tolling bells, orthodox icons and bearded priests despatching the infernal ones by piercing the left eye. A delicious feast of horrors, swathed in twilight, for the connoisseur of the cinematic supernatural. A film to be relished again and again.
1 Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Although dubbed (or with English subtitles) and in black and white this film is traditional gothic-horror at its best.
Visually its very impressive (lots of shadows, large creepy sets, e.t.c) yet surprisingly very little blood or gore with the emphasis on building the suspense and the story.
The theme of this film is a family curse, a witch returning from the grave to take possession of the descendent of her enemy and love lasting beyond the grave. It begins quite dramatically with a mob of angry peasants nailing a demonic mask onto a rather voluptuous witch before burning her and her boyfriend at the stake and it builds up from there so much that you don't want to take your eyes off the screen !
Anyone who like old Hammer films and the Poe Vincent Price films would love this and I can't recommend it enough !!

AND this is now available in a box set (cheaper !) which includes another classic (Black Sabbath) which are all films of the same Italian director.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Any fan of this seminal horror classic will simply have to own the double-version blu-ray package offered here. Both THE MASK OF SATAN and BLACK SUNDAY look just fine in widescreen HD, and this is the first time fans have been treated to AIP's cut on home video in 1.85 35mm (the old laserdisc offered a standard 16). Extras are fine, prepared by Bava expert Tim Lucas, and the overall package is most appealing. Highly recommended!
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This excellent serving of gothic horror was a real feast. The familiar vampire/witchcraft scenario was expertly crafted and shot by Mario Bava and we are brought back to a world of superstition and brutality in a story set in Moldavia in the 17th century and later into the 19th century.

As Barbara Steele said in a 1995 interview, the first ten minutes are very powerful as the fear is internalized. Princess Asa, a satanist, is condemned to death by her brother, an Inquisitor. She, and her servant, Vivoich are condemned to be burned but before that, they have the Mask of Satan banged on to their faces ; there is a close-up of the mask from the witch's viewpoint as she sees the spikes which will pierce her flesh. The mask fills the whole screen. They were due to be burnt at the stakes but the purifying flames are extinguished by a hard, (Satan's?) rainstorm.This is an important part of the plot's set-up because Asa and Vivoich's remains are extant.

Asa curses her brother and her family down through the generations and swears revenge. Asa is interred in the family chapel, eternally facing the Cross through a glass screen; Vivoich is buried unceremoniously in unconsecrated ground and thus the story unwinds on its own supernatural logic.Two centuries later, Asa's descendants still live in the same gloomy castle and we see that their world has become cold, rotten and ruinous. There is Katya, Asa's direct Christian relative, Constantine, her brother and her father the fearful holder of the principality with a small household consisting of servants like Ivan and young Boris. Near at hand is the village with its Church and the long-bearded Orthodox clergyman.

Two centuries of peace are disrupted on Black Sunday, St.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Customer Discussions



Feedback