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The Black Legend of Prince Rupert's Dog: Witchcraft and Propaganda during the English Civil War Hardcover – 6 Jun 2011

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 254 pages
  • Publisher: Liverpool University Press; First Edition edition (6 Jun. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0859898598
  • ISBN-13: 978-0859898591
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 2.3 x 16.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,201,473 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

'A cross-over book, appealing as it should to those who are obsessed by witchcraft and those who are keen followers of civil war studies.' --Professor Martyn Bennett, Nottingham Trent University

About the Author

Mark Stoyle is Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Southampton. He is the author of 'Loyalty and Locality: Popular Allegiance in Devon during the English Civil War' University of Exeter Press, 1994), 'From Deliverance to Destruction: Rebellion and Civil War in an English City' (UEP, 1996), 'West Britons: Cornish Identities and the Early Modern British State' (UEP, 2002) and 'Circled with Stone: Exeters City Walls 1485-1660' (UEP, 2003).

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This is an interesting exercise in intellectual history. The thesis is very speculative but interesting. That the climate of back-biting a la pamphlets written by Royalist and Roundhead; which included the dog (Boye)and Master; was a basis for the worsening climate of witchcraft (perception thereof and subsequent prosecution), which occurred in the later 1600's. It's also the case that he contextualizes the tale of Boye in this climate. Original. I've read it twice and its rewarding but its not immediately accessible to a non-academic. An article in History does cover it in brief. I have given it four not five stars because I am not sure Stoyle is correct in all he says (how can one know; for instance the issue of who wrote a famous pamphlet about that dog is debatable to my mind still) and, as said, its speculative; plus its not an easy read; but he has a fascinating approach to history and in germ its a 5* read. Better stop before I change it back!!

PS on review upgraded to 5* Not a 4*dog!!!!
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You may have read or seen the movie about Marley, "The World's Worst Dog." Marley, at least, was just a dog, and those whom he troubled might have had to suffer torn belongings and other messes. Marley was a piker at "worstness" though; he did not speak all the languages of Satan, for instance, and he could not change his shape into that of a seductive woman, and he could not render himself and his master invisible. These are the sorts of naughtiness ascribed to Boy, a dog who lived over three centuries ago and belonged to Prince Rupert, nephew of the British King Charles I. Boy, whatever demonic things he could do, did play a real role in the English Civil War, and he did affect how the British regarded witches, so if you are interested in reading a book about a real dog with a real place in history, here is _The Black Legend of Prince Rupert's Dog: Witchcraft and Propaganda during the English Civil War_ (University of Exeter Press) by Mark Stoyle. The author is a history professor with special interest in witchcraft and the Civil War period, and says that he knew even as a child that Prince Rupert had possessed an unusual dog. While Stoyle denies that he was "bewitched" by the story, he started devoting serious academic attention to the dog six years ago, mostly because although the occult connections of Boy were famous in the dog's own time, and have been storied ever since, no one had investigated the origin of the rumors about the dog or how Prince Rupert's diabolical image developed over time. This is the book to do just that, and the play of superstition and its effect on reality is fascinating throughout.

Rupert with Boy crossed to England to help his uncle fight against the Roundheads.
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I am endlessly fascinated by the English Civil War period. I first came across Prince Rupert's dog in the film in the 1970 film Cromwell [DVD] (1970) [2003] starring Richard Harris as Cromwell and Timothy Dalton as Rupert so it was wonderful to have even that film referenced in this book.
This is a great book - well certainly for English Civil War obsessives such as I anyway.
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A compelling view on witches and warfare in seventeenth-century England in which even the dashing Prince Rupert is upstaged by his beloved dog Boy. As expected this is a scholarly piece of research with nevertheless some enjoyable speculations, such as offering a potential parallel between a meeting of the king, queen and prince at Edgehill with a conference of their respective canines. The book is well illustrated with contemporary woodcuts and title pages.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Real Consequences of Superstitions Beliefs 1 Sept. 2011
By Rob Hardy - Published on Amazon.com
You may have read or seen the movie about Marley, "The World's Worst Dog." Marley, at least, was just a dog, and those whom he troubled might have had to suffer torn belongings and other messes. Marley was a piker at "worstness" though; he did not speak all the languages of Satan, for instance, and he could not change his shape into that of a seductive woman, and he could not render himself and his master invisible. These are the sorts of naughtiness ascribed to Boy, a dog who lived over three centuries ago and belonged to Prince Rupert, nephew of the British King Charles I. Boy, whatever demonic things he could do, did play a real role in the English Civil War, and he did affect how the British regarded witches, so if you are interested in reading a book about a real dog with a real place in history, here is _The Black Legend of Prince Rupert's Dog: Witchcraft and Propaganda during the English Civil War_ (University of Exeter Press) by Mark Stoyle. The author is a history professor with special interest in witchcraft and the Civil War period, and says that he knew even as a child that Prince Rupert had possessed an unusual dog. While Stoyle denies that he was "bewitched" by the story, he started devoting serious academic attention to the dog six years ago, mostly because although the occult connections of Boy were famous in the dog's own time, and have been storied ever since, no one had investigated the origin of the rumors about the dog or how Prince Rupert's diabolical image developed over time. This is the book to do just that, and the play of superstition and its effect on reality is fascinating throughout.

Rupert with Boy crossed to England to help his uncle fight against the Roundheads. He may have come to the service bearing a reputation as a witch or sorcerer, but any such stories would have been forgotten if it were not for the Roundhead pamphleteers, who hinted at "divelish" outrages, or referred to Rupert taking disguises in order to spy on the Roundheads, but said he had taken "severall shapes" in such disguises, hinting at the witch's capacity for shape-shifting. On their side, the Royalists were happy to portray the Roundheads as dunderheads who could believe the most foolish superstitions. They produced a famous pamphlet of 1643, _Observations upon Prince Rupert's White Dog Called Boy_, the text of which is included as an appendix in this book. Historians had first thought the pamphlet was a Roundhead diatribe against Boy's witchery, but Stoyle masterfully shows it to have been a Royalist satire on Puritan propaganda. Among other things, the pamphlet borrowed on the stock belief that a witch would have a "familiar," the devil himself or one of his subordinate imps in the form of a pet, to help the sorcery go along. _Observations_ may have been satire, but it was also the first pamphlet about witchcraft published in England in fifteen years. It would have achieved its purpose of making Royalists laugh at the foolish credulity of Roundheads, but it had a serious unintended consequence. Stoyle shows that the pamphlet, and others, created "an intellectual atmosphere in which the subject of witchcraft could be discussed more freely in print than it had been for many years before." The fanciful stories about Boy only supported the beliefs of the Roundheads that the king was really in league with genuine witches, and thus proved a propaganda masterstroke against the home team that had generated the stories in the first place. It may be that they did influence the first part of the war, increasing the vehemence and courage of the Roundheads; Rupert was not ultimately successful in his campaigns against them, and left England in 1646. More importantly, Stoyle shows, the newly-revived public thinking about witches may have lead the Roundheads to massacre the female Royalist camp-followers after the battle of Naseby. Even more significant, the increased attention paid to the familiars of witches because of Boy's reputation of being himself a familiar may have influenced the way the witch-finder Matthew Hopkins proceeded in his persecutions. No witches were executed in the king's quarters during the years covered in this book, but scores were executed after the Roundheads took over.

Boy himself was killed at the Battle of Marston Moor in 1644, but stories about him continued to reinforce ideas that Rupert was in league with the devil, as were the king and the rest of the Cavaliers. That the dog had absurd stories told about him proves to have been far from a frivolous matter, and a case could be made that Boy because of the reputation bestowed upon him was one of the most influential dogs in history. Stoyle seems to have investigated this surprisingly important sliver of history as deeply as can be done. While many of the connections he draws are tentative (and he admits it), Stoyle's picture is a dark and convincing look at a few monstrosities resulting from the sleep of reason.
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