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Black Celebration [Musikkassette] Import

4.7 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Mute (ECHO-ZYX Music)
  • ASIN: B000XHB3F6
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (63 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
"Black Celebration" is the album where Depeche Mode finally came of age. The innocent synth pop of youth was suddenly engulfed in a dark perverse world of bleak atmospherics and seedy lust. The Basildon boys had given up the friday nights in local Youth Clubs for fetish clubs in Berlin.
Opening with the powerful but doom ladened "Black Celebration" the album varies between dark, intense atmospheres and minimal, stark ballads.
Tracks such as the throbbing "A Question Of Time" and politicised "New Dress" attemp to raise the tempo and are as close as the album gets to poppier moments. The sad haunting ballads are best represented by the magnificent "A Question Of Lust" and eerie "It Doesn't Matter Two".
Falling somewhere in between these tracks is the wonderfully dark brooding and intense "Stripped" and "Here Is The House" where a clock is used as the percussive back-drop.
"Black Celebration" is often rightly considered to be one of Depeche Mode's best albums. Whilst mot immediately accessible it is certainly an album that set the agenda for the rest of their career.
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Format: Audio CD
There's something about this album that has somehow defied 21 years of the time that has elapsed since it's creation.

Perhaps it's the incredible remix job on the dvd mixes in 5.1. Maybe it's the dense atmosphere during recording. Or more likely a combination of the aforementioned, plus the fact that these songs got the "personal lyrics mixed with actually quite uplifting music" axiom absolutely spot on.

Don't get me wrong; VIOLATOR is a great collection of songs and an excellent album but THIS came first, and it sounds more raw, more punchier and less...commercially oriented. It's a very personal and possibly self indulgent work. I actually originally heard this AFTER I'd soaked myslef in violator and music for the masses, and was really blown away by the whole package. In some ways, this is a better descendant to lead up to violator.

the remix work done on the 5.1 mixes, the documentary, the power inherant on repeated listens....this IMHO is almost perfect ( only the dated reference to "princess di" shows the 80's roots), but otherwise the uniqueness of the sounds - thanks to the trimuverate producing and programming as per SOME GREAT REWARD and CONSTRUCTION - and production make it stand up today.

Bolshy, Powerful and near damn perfect...pick up a copy now!
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Format: Audio CD
Black Celebration is one of the finest Depeche Mode albums ever to have been released (Second only to Violator in my opinion). But one of the biggest debates is which version is better? The original UK LP ends with "New Dress", a very dark and bleak song that takes stabs at societies vanities as well as the many sick and twisted shortcomings we evoke amongst ourselves (i.e. murder, famine, ect.).
After listening to the entire album and having it end with this song, you can't help but fall into a state of melancholy (or "depressed mode" as it were), which is fine if that's where you want to go. But the US version of Black Celebration offers a different solution. Unlike the UK version, the US release ends with "But Not Tonight", a song about hope and redemption. Purists will of course scoff that it was never intended to become the final track on the album, and was only recorded as the b-side to Stripped. Many also view it as too "positive" a song, that doesn't fit with the rest of the album ideology (kind of like the theatrical cut of Blade Runner with the tacked on happy ending).
While we're all entitled to our own opinions, I gotta say that there is merit in having this track included at the end. It really comes down to how you want to feel after you've listened to the whole album. For me, "But Not Tonight" is like a light at the end of a very dark tunnel. While life may seem hopeless and out of control at times, there is still some good in this world to look forward to. When you listen to that song after experiencing all of the darkness and pain that comes before it, you can't help but feel a sense of calming relief. A sense of hope for the future.
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Format: Audio CD
Depeche Mode changed forever with the release of their classic 1986 release, Black Celebration. Keyboard virtuoso Alan Wilder has his classically-trained imprint written all over this album while Martin Gore's lyrics are as cutting as ever and David Gahan's vocals, while perhaps a little overproduced, are the icing on the Black Forest Gateau. Oh, and Andrew Fletcher probably made some very nice cups of tea.
This was also one of the first albums which took the art of sound sampling to an extreme, creating broad cinematic audio vistas and superbly sculpted thematic landscapes, with each track blending effortlessly into the next. You'll also find some of the weirdest sounds ever heard on a mainstream album, although to categorise Black Celebration as 'mainstream' would be pushing a point. That's not to say there are no great songs or tunes onboard. Every track is a classic and as different from one another as they can possibly be, but highlights must be the sweeping Here Is The House, the epic Stripped, the breakneck Question of Time, the poignant pop of New Dress, the supercharged title track and of course the live favourite, Fly On The Windscreen. However, it would be best to stick to the original version of this album, ie, the version without the bonus tracks, which are at best pretty second-rate (But Not Tonight is like something from their poppy 1982 offering A Broken Frame and thus is totally out of context with the rest of the album).
This is not an album for the faint-hearted and upon first inspection it may sound a tad, well, depressing. However, upon repeated listenings, the sheer uplifting and unnerving power of this album shines through, an album which has influenced more bands than I can care to mention here.
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