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Comment: Ships from USA: May take 10 to 15 business days for delivery. Very Good Condition - May show some limited signs of wear and may have a remainder mark. Pages and dust cover are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. Tracking is not available for orders shipped outside of the United States.
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Birth Control, Sex, and Marriage in Britain 1918-1960 Paperback – 15 Jul 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 302 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA (15 July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199544603
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199544608
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 1.8 x 15.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 928,003 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

An engaging text with a wealth of information ... impressive and important because it uses both men and women's account of sex, contraception and gender roles to challenge historiography of feminism and family planning. (Hilary Young, Oral History)

[A] tribute to the power of oral history...extremely meticulous. (London Review of Books)

thoroughly researched, thoughtfully argued and well-written book. (Christabelle Sethna, Metascience)

Synopsis

The first half of the twentieth century witnessed a revolution in contraceptive behaviour as the large Victorian family disappeared. This book offers a new perspective on the gender relations, sexual attitudes, and contraceptive practices that accompanied the emergence of the smaller family in modern Britain. Kate Fisher draws on a range of first-hand evidence, including over 190 oral history interviews, in which individuals born between 1900 and 1930 described their marriages and sexual relationships. By using individual testimony she challenges many of the key conditions that have long been envisaged by demographic and historical scholars as necessary for any significant reduction in average family size to take place.Dr Fisher demonstrates that a massive expansion in birth control took place in a society in which sexual ignorance was widespread; that effective family limitation was achieved without the mass adoption of new contraceptive technologies; that traditional methods, such as withdrawal, absitinence, and abortion were often seen as preferable to modern appliances, such as condoms and caps; that communication between spouses was not key to the systematic adoption of contraception; and, above all, that women were not necessarily the driving force behind the attempt to avoid pregnancy.

Women frequently avoided involvement in family planning decisions and practices, whereas the vast majority of men in Britain from the interwar period onward viewed the regular use of birth control as a masculine duty and obligation. By allowing this generation to speak for themselves, Kate Fisher produces a richer understanding of the often startling social atttitudes and complex conjugal dynamics that lay behind the vast changes in contraceptive behaviour and family size in the twentieth century.

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