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Bill, the Galactic Hero: The Planet of the Robot Slaves (BILL THE GALACTIC HERO) by [Harrison, Harry]
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Bill, the Galactic Hero: The Planet of the Robot Slaves (BILL THE GALACTIC HERO) Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 320 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

About the Author

Harry Harrison (1925 - 2012)

Harry Harrison was born Henry Maxwell Dempsey in Connecticut, in 1925. He is the author of a number of much-loved series including the Stainless Steel Rat and Bill the Galactic Hero sequences and the Deathworld Trilogy. He is known as a passionate advocate of Esperanto, the most popular of the constructed international languages, which appears in many of his novels. He has been publishing novels for over half a century and is perhaps best known for his seminal novel of overpopulation, Make Room! Make Room!, which was adapted into the cult film Soylent Green. He died in 2012.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 969 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Gateway (15 Oct. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009HCANEA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #65,195 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 14 April 1999
Format: Paperback
THE first Bill novel was originally published in 1965, so imagine the surprise when in 1989 a sequel appeared. This (first) sequel was Bill, the Galactic Hero ... On the Planet of Robot Slaves, again expertly written by classic SF author Harry Harrison. This book whilst being an excellent follow-up, is perhaps not quite as good as the original; it is certainly hard to believe that the two books were written about 24 years apart. Harrison recaptures the style and humour of the original perfectly and introduces some fine comedy-SF concepts along the way. This tale begins on the planet Grundgy, a barren and worthless world with only two seasons: frigid winter and tropical summer; the perfect planet on which to site a military base. Having persuaded some new recruits that it'd be in their best interest to part with a little money, Bill is able to afford to have the second of a pair of tusks bequeathed to him by Deathwish Drang surgically implanted, and so visits mad Doctor Mel Praktis. Following this short and painful operation, Bill urges the Doctor to do something about his foot. For some reason he is unhappy with the giant mutant chicken claw that presently passes as his right foot. Before Bill can argue any more the roof of the hospital is blown off as the base is attacked by giant flying dragons, which, as Bill and Praktis soon learn, are of the metal, Chinger-controlled variety. Bill, Praktis and a somewhat motley crew are dispatched into space aboard the only available ship: a garbage tug, commanded by the permanently stoned Captain Bly. Their mission is to trace the planet that is the source of the Chinger-controlled dragons.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It turned up nice and early, was very well packed. All as said. And I've just finished it, and it was ace!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Utterly brilliant, wacky nonsense, loved it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 0.0 out of 5 stars 0 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty Good Barthroom Humor 16 Mar. 2004
By C. T. Mikesell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Harry Harrison's Bill the Galactic Hero (BtGH) series is the sci-fi equivalent of Robert Aspirin's "Myth" fantasy books: pun-based humor is paramount and the more improbable the plotline the better.
This time around BtGH and company find themselves on the Planet of Usa after a nasty Chinger attack on their military base. Robotic lifeforms are the indigenous species on the planet, with two factions endlessly at war with each other. The Chingers have allied themselves with one of the factions (the one with the robot slaves), leaving the humans to ally themselves with the other. Residing on the planet are several humanoid groups, also endlessly at war with each other.
If you've picked up on the theme of endless war then this book might not be too subtle for you (if the theme escaped you, you might consider a position as a cadet with the Space Troopers). The machinations of war are severely criticized - and parodied - in the novel. In this respect the book is similar to Joseph Heller's Catch-22 (in much the same way that microwaveable pork rinds are akin to a Honeybaked ham), but because so little of the storyline can be taken seriously Harrison's commentary is easily dismissed if you happen to disagree with it.
The first BtGH book was divided into three major sections. Here the story takes place in half a dozen or so set pieces, each having very little to do with each other (beyond taking place on the Planet of the Robot Slaves). Some of them are funny (The Roman Legion vs. King Arthur), some of them are not (the PLDP).
Take away the comedy and there's not a lot to recommend this book. I happen to find character names like Cy BerPunk (computer technician) and Mel Praktis (doctor) mildly amusing - plus my father, brother and a nephew are each named Bill (only the nephew has true Galactic Hero potential), so it's fun to tweak them about their namesake. If these things don't hold true for you, you might want to consider reading a different book.
4.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable read with a message 30 Nov. 2003
By Geert Daelemans - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Bill does not like danger, although he is supposed to really get a kick out of it, him being a Space Trooper and all. But no matter what he does -mainly trying to get danger as far as possible away from him or vice versa- heroism keeps following Bill without mercy. That is why he is still alive and kicking. That is, because of an earlier accident: kicking with his two right arms -there weren't any spare left ones- and his chicken leg -there weren't any human legs left. When his camp is attacked by gigantic metal dragons he volunteers not to be made member of the revenge mission, and that is exactly what his commander officer decides not to do...
Harry Harrison has a talent for the absurd. With seemingly no effort he paradises the whole science fiction genre and gets away with it. If you would want to compare him with to writers, you are bound to think of him as Terry Pratchett being genetically cloned in the neighborhood of Douglas Adams. Although Harrison never reaches the level of absurdness of Adams and is only a few times as funny as Pratchett, he still has created a quite enjoyable character in the hero of Bill. What makes this story special is its continuous anti-war message. Although most of the characters crave for some kind of unending battle, it is clear to the reader that the absurdness of the wars described in this book is certainly not far from what is happening in our world. It is certainly quite surprising and refreshing to see such theme appear in this kind of book.
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