Buy Used
£2.79
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Big Red Train Ride (Picador Books) Paperback – 10 Nov 1989

3.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 10 Nov 1989
"Please retry"
£74.96 £0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; New edition edition (10 Nov. 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 033030805X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330308052
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 19.7 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 237,283 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

In his 1978 book The Big Red Train Ride, celebrated travel-writer Eric Newby traces the 5900 mile journey from Moscow to Nakhodka (on Russia's Pacific coast) that he made in 1977 on the Russian Trans-Siberian Railway. Rather like his successor travel writers Paul Theroux and Bill Bryson, Newby's writing is a compelling mix of historical detail and lighter, more whimsical passages - the latter often arising as a result of Newby's attempts to circumvent the strict rules and regulations (which, for example, banned the opening of train windows!) imposed on foreign travellers in Soviet Russia which were in force at the time of his journey.

For the trip, Newby was accompanied by three fellow travellers - his single-minded Slovenian-born wife, Wanda (whom Newby met whilst escaping from captivity in Italy during WWII), a German Jew who is obsessed with photography, Otto, and the trio's Soviet-appointed minder, Mischa. Newby's writing is never less than interesting, combining a mix of easy-to-read chatty prose, with some passages of beautiful and lucid descriptive writing covering the terrain and environment through which he passed during his 192-hour train voyage. Newby had clearly undertaken extensive research for the trip (as well as having some prior experience of travel in Soviet Russia), and the book provides extensive (and much astonishing) detail of the history of the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway during the latter part of the 19th century, and of the history of the various inhabitant races over the preceding centuries.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
As someone who is planning to travel the Trans-Siberian Railway in the not too distant future I read with interest this book that follows Eric Newby's journey taken back in 1977.
Accompanied by his wife, a German photographer and their official guide from the then USSR authorities, it makes for interesting reading to go back into the "good old days" of the Cold War and revisit life behind the Iron Curtain.
There are many facts and figures about the railway and its construction which can become slightly laborious, far more interesting are the passages taken for other writings by other adventurers who travelled the route, either on the train or by sledge, in far earlier times.
Unfortunately Newby's style of writing can be quite workmanlike and as such you don't get any feeling for his thoughts about his fellow travellers or those he meets on the journey. Rather than write the book interspersed with witty anecdotes he labours on about the point of how the photography opportunities were restricted and mentions little else about the actual happenings on the journey. For example one photograph within the book shows the interior of a woodsman's cottage, yet we read nothing of how they came to visit this place and what the woodsman's life was like.
Finally the book's ending was particularly disappointing; basically they reach the end and then go home. No mention of if any contact was kept between him and either his German photographer friend, no mention if he final falling out with the USSR official had any further impacts, or how they actually got home from the end of nowhere.
I would possibly read any of Newby's other travel-logs only if I had a specific interest in that location.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
I last read this book while actually travelling on the Trans-Siberian Railway during the Gorbachev era - I found it odd that photos in the book taken years ago, were still possible to replicate all those years later!

No it's not the best written book in the world, but if you do the train ride, it all makes sense...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
So pleased to be able to find some old Eric Newby books for my husband who is a great fan of the author
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback