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The Big Questions: Mathematics by [Crilly, Tony]
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The Big Questions: Mathematics Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Length: 209 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

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Product Description

From the Back Cover

The Big Questions series answers the fundamental problems that have perplexed enquiring minds throughout history. Ranging from the first known numbers and Plato's ideal forms to chaos theory and Fermat's last theorem, this book confronts the 20 key questions at the heart of mathematics and our understanding of the world. What is mathematics for? How big is infinity? Is mathematics even true? Can maths guarantee riches? Do butterflies' wings really cause hurricanes? Where do parallel lines meet? Can we create an unbreakable code? Is there a formula for everything? What shape is the universe? Can maths predict the future? Where do numbers come from? What is the maths of nature? Are imaginary numbers real? How is mathematics beautiful? Which are the strangest numbers? What are three dimensions not enough? What is symmetry? Why are prime numbers atoms? Are statistics lies? Is there anything left to solve?

About the Author

Tony Crilly is Reader in Mathematical Sciences at Middlesex University, having previously taught at the University of Michigan, the City University in Hong Kong, and the Open University. His principal research interest is the history of mathematics, and he has written and edited many works on fractals, chaos and computing. He is the author of the acclaimed biography of the English mathematician Arthur Cayley.

Simon Blackburn is Professor of Philosophy at Cambridge University, and one of the most distinguished philosophers writing today. He is the author of the bestselling Dictionary of Philosophy, Think and Being Good, which has appeared in 15 languages. His Truth: A Guide for the Perplexed, a guidebook to philosophical ideas about truth and its distortions, from classical times to the present, has been published to rave reviews.

Simon Blackburn is Professor of Philosophy at Cambridge University, and one of the most distinguished philosophers writing today. He is the author of the bestselling Dictionary of Philosophy, Think and Being Good, which has appeared in 15 languages. His Truth: A Guide for the Perplexed, a guidebook to philosophical ideas about truth and its distortions, from classical times to the present, has been published to rave reviews.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3243 KB
  • Print Length: 209 pages
  • Publisher: Quercus (24 Nov. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006PIJP4I
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #239,794 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have developed an interest in mathematics (in my 30's) after years of just needing to know enough to get by and do my job (I work in programming and computing). And I found this book very interesting at explaining core concepts and bringing things together. It;s not in-depth, but its a great read.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the most lucid and readable books on maths that I have read. Highly recommended; 200 pages of "wonderment" and thin enough to slip into my holday bags.
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By Dave TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 July 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Really good for inquiring minds and a very good read. If your child is good at maths this book could well inspire them to take the subject further.

Some of the topics went over my head but that is my fault not the book. Even so there was still plenty I could understand.

So if you are interested in imaginary numbers, different types of infinity and hotels with infinite numbers of bedrooms that are full then this is for you.

As a taster one section is about parallel lines meeting which I though was obviously impossible but then I was thing of a flat 2D surface. I never even considered parallel lines on a different shaped surface.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am not a mathematician and have no formal training maths since I went into a grammar school sixth form in 1948! However, I like a challenge and I am working through this book which is very interesting and from time to time I am surprised by maths that I knew nothing about and at other times sceptical about what seem to be directions that must cost much to achieve but have added little to our civilisation.That, of course, applies to many disciplines. Going is some times hard and I skip a bit from time to time but the basic discussion is very clear. Just one comment about the Kindle version: the fractions, often very important to scrutinise carefully, come out on my tablet as a near point 1or2 script.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Quite a stimulating read. It brings a lot of things together, setting out ,for example,the importance of prime numbers in cryptography and how this is used in everyday life to make electronic communications secure. It also shows a little of how mathematicians think. Interesting section on whether at the end mathematics is actually true. Not obvious.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Again, all the usual suspects - but very well done; and treating the audience like adults even though written at a semi popular level. Fifty years ago, this sort of book encouraged me to go forward with maths and I hope this one does the same for some young people today
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is an exciting and intellectually stimulating guide to some of the big questions in mathematics.
My maths had become very rusty since my 'A' levels taken over 50 years ago and I found this fascinating book an enjoyable way of getting back into the subject.
Tony Crilly explains mathematics in an accessible and engaging way and I would recommend 'The Big Questions' to anyone previously intimidated by the subject.
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