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Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
34
Big Chief Elizabeth: How England's Adventurers Gambled and Won the New World
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on 26 September 2017
Another great historical work from Milto. Read this straight after Nathanial's Nutmeg and wasn't disappointed. If you liked Nutmeg, you will like this. Milton has a gift for detailing factual history as a really good story.
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on 24 November 2017
Tells a good tale.
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on 16 July 2001
This is even better that Nathaniel's Nutmeg. I've seldom encountered such a spirited history. At times it is very funny (with one little anecdote that perhaps explains the origin of the phrase "raining cats and dogs"), and at other times it is heartbreaking, especially when the author succeeds in breathing life into the often doomed colonists.
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on 29 September 2017
my husband really enjoyed this book
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on 2 May 2017
Superb transaction and a great book!!
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on 4 September 2001
Having read, and thoroughly enjoyed Nathaniel's Nutmeg I looked forward to reading Big Chief Elizabeth. I was not disappointed. The book is written in a swashbuckling manner that takes you to the bridge of many an English Galleon as Britain tried to push forward the boundaries of her Elizabethan Empire. Detailing the rise and fall of an English hero, Sir Walter Ralegh, the book takes you to Roanoke and the first contact with Native American Indians. It tells, in full bloody detail, the way in which the trust of these natives was first gained and subsequently lost. It is a story of greed and betrayal, of hardship and suffering and details the true frontier spirit that drove the explorers of the Elizabethan Court.
If you enjoy reading about the characters that played a major role in shaping our history, you will certainly be captivated by this enthralling story.
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VINE VOICEon 6 February 2003
Giles Milton tells the story of the early English colonisation of North America in this account. What really shines though is the sheer incompetence of the early settlers, their inability to till the earth, and their ignorant treatment of the native americans. Despite the ambitious and swashbuckling plans to colonise the new world in the name of Queen Elizabeth, they failed to bring adequate supplies and opted for a bad initial location.
Being from Ireland, where Sir Walter Raleigh had many estates around Youghal in Cork, I am familiar with the man, but I had not realised the extent of his involvment in this extraordinary tale. Raleigh, and his compatriot, Herriot shine though as men of vision and ability in the midst of all the foolishness, even though Sir Walter was not above pandering to the VIrgin Queen when required.
An interesting read that well ilustrates a piece of history that many of us might not be very familar with.
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on 8 February 2002
Many people on both sides of the Atlantic will have some vague knowledge of England's first attempts to colonise North America. This book gives us a very good feel for the mood of the time, as England embarked on a ferocious and daring campaign of piracy and settlement which challenged and finally eclipsed Spain's supremacy on the ocean.
Perhaps the author should give some more information about the Elizabethan conquest of Ireland, especially the plantation of Munster which was a testing ground for many of those who later founded the colonies in America, especially the extraordinary courtier Walter Ralegh, poet, courtier and adventurous pirate.
Overall, I found this book a very good reminder of half forgotten events, and a really excellent portrayal of the people on both sides of the Atlantic whose lives were shapen by the colonial experiment.
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on 25 July 2017
If the Americans could only know how close the British settlements came to not being....

Bless Pocahontas, and the Royal Navy!!!!
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Even better than Milton's celebrated Nathaniel's Nutmeg and Samurai William, this scrap of American history plays like a sci-fi tale of colonists seeking out a "new world". The human tragedy of Europe's first interaction with the original Americans is palpable. History, which to me as a child was ever dull and tortuous, comes to life in this modern swashbuckler.
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