FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Beyond and Before has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Wordery
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: This fine as new copy should be with you within 6-9 working days via Royal Mail.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Beyond and Before Paperback – 23 Jun 2011

3.7 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.99
£8.57 £7.49
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£14.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Beyond and Before
  • +
  • Mountains Come Out of the Sky: The Complete Illustrated History of Prog Rock
  • +
  • Citizens of Hope and Glory: The Story of Progressive Rock
Total price: £46.41
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Continuum (23 Jun. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826423329
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826423320
  • Product Dimensions: 15.4 x 2 x 22.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 400,677 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Examining every aspect of progressive rock - words and music, theatre and politics - Hegarty and Halliwell deftly unpick the tangled threads of tradition and radicalism that make up the genre's tapestry. In addition to shedding vital new light on an often maligned and misunderstood phase in rock's history, this probing and incisive study tracks prog's continued and unexpected reverberations through popular music  long after punk had supposedly vanquished and banished it. --Simon Reynolds, author of Retromania: Pop Culture's Addiction to Its Own Past and Rip It Up and Start Again: Postpunk 1978-84

"Beyond and Before is a wonderful account of both the rich legacy and the ongoing story of progressive rock in all its forms. At last, here is a book that gives prog its due respect as a vital part of the history of rock music, without tying it to a simplistic narrative of over-ambition, decadence and decline. The best thing about the book is its comprehensive, nuanced definition of what counts as progressive. In Hegarty and Halliwell's capable hands we journey from such unlikely precursors of the concept album as Frank Sinatra and Duke Ellington, through the 1970s Golden Age of Jethro Tull, Genesis and Pink Floyd to contemporary exponents as various as Spock's Beard, Porcupine Tree and The Decemberists." --Greg Walker, Regius Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature, University of Edinburgh

This is a great book. Hegarty and Halliwell have rescued progressive rock from the condescension of history by crafting a work that is smart, sympathetic, and impressively sweeping in its coverage of a much derided, yet enormously diverse and influential transnational music. Whether your taste is Porcupine Tree or Pink Floyd, Epica or ELP, Mike Oldfield or Midlake, there is plenty to admire and ponder in this ambitious and compelling account. By offering an expanded definition of prog rock in terms of its roots, musical and lyrical characteristics, geographic sources, artwork, performance practices, and legacies, Beyond and Before offers an exhilarating read. --Brian Ward, Professor of American Studies at the University of Manchester

About the Author

Martin Halliwell is Professor of American Studies and Head of the Department of English at the University of Leicester, UK. He is the author of American Culture in the 1950s (Columbia UP, 2007), and the editor of two series for Edinburgh University Press: Twentieth Century American Culture, and Edinburgh Critical Guides to Literature. Paul Hegarty teaches Philosophy and Visual Culture at University College Cork, in Ireland. He is the author of books on Bataille and Baudrillard. He jointly runs the experimental record label dotdotdotmusic, and occasionally performs in the noise 'bands' Safe, and Working With Children.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I really like the balance of this book - it reevaluates the progressive music I remember from the 1970s and explores bands that combine progressive elements with other musical influences and directions. The book's central concept of time, and the fascinating connections that the authors make between early and recent versions of prog, suggest to me that we are still only approaching the edge of understanding the breadth and impact of progressive music. A must for serious music lovers.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Progressive or 'prog' is a style of music that was immensely popular in the early 70s, and some wonderful music was produced by bands such as Genesis, Yes, ELP, Pink Floyd, The Moody Blue etc. Fashions change (quite rightly), and the desire to listen to long, complex songs disappeared and was replaced, certainly in the media, with back-to-basics punk. What prog rock failed to do is to be acknowledged by the generation that replaced the myopic journalists of the late 70s, who's mantra was 'prog is rubbish' that, like all types of music, there is good, mediocre and poor. Prog is no different, so to have a book written to the standard of this tome that takes time to discuss this is all the more welcome.

The writing style is analytical, almost academic, but always clear and interesting. I found a mistake in the first few minutes of picking the book up (Fairport Convention's 'Matty Groves' does not feature a character called Lord Donald, but Lord Darnell, itself a mishearing of Lord Arnold), but some get hot under the collar about such things. Personally, I am more excited about this books existence to let a lack of editorial effort spoil my day.

It goes into detail on many albums of the 70s, and I particularly liked the work covering Genesis, a personal fave of mine from this period; I feel they took advantage of the prog rule book (i.e. there wasn't one!) and produced wonderful tuneful music free of ego or pretension. The authors seem to know their onions and even die hard lovers of this genre will more than likely come away from this book with more than they did when they came to it.

I can heartily recommend. If you like a bit of prog (and this include stuff like Radiohead - why? Because they are so clearly prog; listen to Paranoid Android on OK Computer, a finer example of prog I have yet to hear!), and get a kick out of mellotron, flutes and bonkers time sigs, then this book is for you.
1 Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's great that Prog is starting to get the attention from writers that it deserves, and every book on the subject is welcome. But with the benchmark books out now from the likes of Stump, Mecan and Martin this book just doesn't add anything; it doesn't PROGress the story. Disappointed.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book gets off to a dodgy start - Magma a German band; 'Revolver' a 1965 album - but the authors eventual settle down into quite a nice groove. The writing is not for the casual reader - a bit of effort is required. The early sections cover ground that will be quite familiar to readers of other prog. books - perhaps too familiar - and the interpretations of lyrics and concepts are, at times, specious, though this is common enough in books on the genre. It's the later sections that I found most interesting - on women in prog., on progressive metal (even though I don't like the stuff), and on progressive folk. The chapter on jazz-rock fusion, by contrast, is quite poor - though I'm an aficionado and clearly the authors aren't. All-in-all, a worthwhile addition to the growing canon of prog. tomes. Not for me as snappy as Paul Stump's frequently derided 'The Music's All That Matters' but an enjoyable read just the same. Prog. fans can be very confident that the authors are taking their music seriously - which is as it should be.
1 Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
When I were a lad, groups tried to get better. They tried different things, different instruments, different ways of using the recording studio. They tried to "progress". The best at doing this were The Beatles.

Gradually, groups trying to progress became something called "Progressive Rock" or, eventually, about as welcome as "Sci-Fi", "Prog". This is a book about Prog.

Prog can be over-elaborate. This book is over-elaborate. Prog can be pretentious. This book is pretentious. However, Prog doesn't make many mistakes of fact, this book is riddled with them. Here are three examples: Keith Moon played drum solos; no he didn't. The Rolling Stones released a thousand doves at the Brian Jones memorial Hyde Park free concert; no they didn't, they released butterflies, can you imagine how much space a thousand doves would take? Keith Jenkins played with Soft Machine; no he didn't, it was Karl Jenkins.

These writers spend too much time on their "paradigms", etc. and not enough on checking facts. This is a bad, and very tedious book. Prog can be both bad and tedious, but it also has glorious highs. I didn't find any in this book.
1 Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback