£7.99 + £1.26 UK delivery
Only 1 left in stock. Sold by TOP-MUSIC-UK
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this item. Your item will be previously owned but still in great condition. The disc will play perfectly without interruption and the case, inlay notes and sleeve may show limited signs of wear.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£19.26
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: FastMedia "Ships From USA"
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £4.99

Beethoven - Symphony No 7; Triple Concerto (LSO, Haitink) Live

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

Price: £7.99
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by TOP-MUSIC-UK.
6 new from £7.99 14 used from £1.29
£7.99 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by TOP-MUSIC-UK.

Amazon's Bernard Haitink Store


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Product details

  • Conductor: Bernard Haitink
  • Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Audio CD (3 April 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Live
  • Label: Lso Live
  • ASIN: B000ETQSCQ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 241,347 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • Sample this album Artist - Artist (Sample)
1
30
13:24
Album Only
2
30
7:41
Play in Library Buy: £0.89
 
3
30
9:05
Play in Library Buy: £0.89
 
4
30
8:30
Play in Library Buy: £0.89
 
5
30
17:39
Album Only
6
30
5:01
Play in Library Buy: £0.89
 
7
30
13:13
Album Only

Product Description

Product Description

Beethoven was rarely explicit about any meaning behind his works. However it is impossible to listen to his Seventh Symphony without being captivated by a sense of euphoria, tainted only by what is possibly the most profound slow movement he was to write. Where the symphony is bold in its exuberance, the Triple Concerto is playful, providing its soloists with a glorious opportunity to flaunt their skills.

Review

'a blazing performance of the Seventh Symphony that reaches a superbly disciplined and frenzied conclusion'
Performance*****
Sound *****
Benchmark Recording -- BBC Music Magazine (UK), May 2006

'simply masterful Beethoven ... Even if you already have umpteen other recordings of these works, you really owe it to yourself to hear this new set. It's a deeply satisfying musical experience' -- Chicago Tribune (US), 13 October 2006

'the best Beethoven Seventh recorded since Carlos Kleiber's DG recording, and frankly, I like it even better than the Klieber ... In sum: Hallelujah! The art of Beethoven conducting is alive and well' -- Hi-Fidelity Review (US), July 2006

CD of the Week
-- Classic FM (UK), 17-23 April 2006

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
The London Symphony Orchestra recorded a complete Beethoven symphony cycle at their resident Barbican theatre between 2005 and 2006, this CD representing symphony 7 and the Triple Concerto.

There are three versions of this CD. This standard version, a hybrid multichannel SADC version, and a further SADC recording as part of the 6 CD complete symphony box set. All are of the same performance, recorded on the LSO Live label and combining digital recording methods with a `Live' venue (London's Barbican) to produce absolutely faultless versions of the works.

While I do appreciate the merits and historic importance of some of the many interpretations of Beethoven's symphonies, these LSO ones I think find their way to the top of the ever-increasing pile for several reasons - the recordings are of a stunningly clear quality, even better if played on a SACD player, and the performances are dramatic and enthusiastic but never succumbing to an over-personalised account by the conductor. Bernard Haitink does the job to perfection.

The sleeve notes provide the usual tracklist and times, plus a short analysis on each symphony, a brief biography of Haitink, and a full list of LSO orchestra members.

Of the three versions of this recording I would have to recommend the box set for sound quality, value and completeness, but any of the three provide a compelling and exciting interpretation of the symphonies.

An essential addition to any Beethoven collection.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This might be the greatest recording of the Beethoven 7 ever made. It's not studio sound, of course, because it's a live recording; but the compensation is ample. The LSO plays with commanding viruosity and style and spirit. Haitink's concept of the symphony is genuinely fresh and utterly convincing, but never stroppily or pointlessly new-fangled. One feels almost there in the Barbican Hall. It's simply thrilling.

The Triple Concerto is less graceful than some performances (I'm thinking of the Oistrakh, Rostopovich, Richter recording with the Berlin Philharmonic and, oddly enough for grace, Karajan). But, again, one gets real character here and the whole gels, thanks to the rapport between the excellent soloists and Haitink's ever-present sense of structure and drive. Nikolitch is as sweet and Hugh as muscular as ever, but I was particularly impressed, actually, by the lovely sounds made by Lars Vogt's piano.

My advice: buy it. In fact, buy them all. You'd be mad to miss this inspirational Beethoven cycle.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Budding conductors could learn a lot from this recording of the Seventh; Haitink seems to do everything so right that I'm hard to put to explain exactly why it leaves me completely cold. This is so obviously subjective that I'll try first to describe the performance as objectively as I can. It's fast, very fast in all four movements, with the light textures and preference for rhythmic crispness over weight that's characteristic of modern chamber-orchestra Beethoven. The only real clue that this isn't a specialist period-instrument band is that there is liberal vibrato throughout. The Barbican acoustic is very dry.

If that sounds like your kind of Beethoven, you'll like this; the LSO play with great professionalism -- although my sense that it's *merely* professional was intensified when I listened to another much-praised recent recording, Ivan Fischer's on Channel Classics. His Budapest Festival Orchestra really do play out of their skins, as though bowled over by the enormous energy of this most vital of symphonies. I found much to admire in Haitink's exposition of the score, but it never once really excited me; Fischer's has the visceral power (and tendency to occasional odd conductorial decisions!) of classics like Chicago/Reiner.

The Triple Concerto is a very different kind of performance. In the long first movement, which needs advocacy and a tight rein to avoid sounding thin in invention for its spaciousness, Haitink gives us a steady, soggy Allegro not helped by the lack of clarity in the recorded sound -- lots of well-focussed bass is nice but may contribute to the masking of detail. It's a world away from the crisp, spick-and-span 7th.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x93aad720) out of 5 stars 7 reviews
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9372c2f4) out of 5 stars Exceptional Performances of the Beethoven 7th Symphony and Triple Concerto from Haitink and LSO 15 Sept. 2006
By John Kwok - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I was literally speechless when I finished listening to this splendid LSO Live recording, amazed by these brilliant recordings made from live performances of both works back in late November, 2005 at the London Symphony Orchestra's Barbican concert hall home. Not only has Bernard Haitink led the London Symphony Orchestra in a brisk, quite exciting, account of Beethoven's Symphony Number 7 in A Major, but his latest recording ranks alongside those by Claudio Abbado and the Berliner Philharmoniker and Carlos Kleiber and the Wiener Philharmoniker as among my favorite recordings of this symphony (Like Abbado, Haitink has used the relatively new Jonathan Del Mar-edited Barenreiter Edition of the 7th Symphony.). Moreover, this may be the best balanced recording I have heard of this symphony, since the sound quality was such that I thought I was listening somewhere in the midst of the orchestra, even while listening from a pair of cheap headphones attached to my compact Sony CD player.

Haitink's latest recorded account of the Beethoven 7th Symphony is quite literally light years removed from his critically acclaimed Philips recording with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. The opening movement (Poco sostenuto - vivace) is as brisk as Abbado's latest account, with superlative playing from the winds, horns and strings. The second movement (Allegretto) sounds like a brisk funeral march (This leads me to wonder why Haitink chose not to emphasize the funeral atmosphere of the 3rd Symphony's second movement in his LSO Live recording, since he does such a fine job here.). Haitink's conducting and the London Symphony Orchestra's performance of the third (Presto) and fourth (Allegro con brio) movements may be the best I have heard for this symphony; with regards to the fourth movement, Haitink's version doesn't sound nearly as rushed as Abbado's, even though Haitink's account seems to be nearly as swift.

This LSO Live recording of the Beethoven Triple Concerto is one of the best I have heard, with exceptional playing from former LSO concertmaster Gordan Nikolitch, former LSO principal cellist Tim Hugh, and pianist Lars Vogt. Theirs is a riveting, exciting performance that is amply supported by the London Symphony Orchestra under Haitink's baton; moreover, the chemistry amongst the three soloists is quite superb as if they had played together for years (which is true for Nikolitch and Hugh), and nor do I hear any rushed entrances by any of these soloists (This is in stark contrast to a live performance I had heard a few years ago at Avery Fisher Hall with Mutter, Harrell and Previn as the respective soloists, failing to keep in time with the New York Philharmonic under Kurt Masur's baton.). Instead, there is much virtuoso "give and take" amongst violinist Nikolitch, cellist Hugh and pianist Vogt, as they exchange melodies and variations in each of the concerto's three movements (A very long Allegro followed by a brief Largo and concluding in a spirited Rondo alla Polacca, which is one of the first major instances of Polish music being used as a source of inspiration in a work composed by a major composer like Beethoven.).

I have no doubt that fans of Beethoven's music, Bernard Haitink, Lars Vogt and, of course, the London Symphony Orchestra will greatly enjoy this recording. Without a doubt, this recording must be regarded as one of the musical highlights of Haitink's new Beethoven symphony cycle. It promises to be a superb cycle blessed with superb state-of-the-art recording from the recording team at LSO Live.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x94333540) out of 5 stars Magnificent Beethoven 3 Nov. 2006
By Matt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
How fascinating to get two such contrasting reviews. Perhaps this is to be expected from such charismatic performanes. For my part, I am with Mr Kwok, heart and soul. This might be the greatest recording of the Beethoven 7 ever made. It's not studio sound, of course, because it's a live recording; but the compensation is ample. The LSO plays with commanding viruosity and style and spirit. Haitink's concept of the symphony is genuinely fresh and utterly convincing, but never stroppily or pointlessly new-fangled. One feels almost there in the Barbican Hall. It's simply thrilling.

The Triple Concerto is less graceful than some performances (I'm thinking of the Oistrakh, Rostopovich, Richter recording with the Berlin Philharmonic and, oddly enough for grace, Karajan). But, again, one gets real character here and the whole gels, thanks to the rapport between the excellent soloists and Haitink's ever-present sense of structure and drive. Nikolitch is as sweet and Hugh as muscular as ever, but I was particularly impressed, actually, by the lovely sounds made by Lars Vogt's piano.

My advice: buy it. In fact, buy them all. You'd be mad to miss this inspirational Beethoven cycle.
HASH(0x93e2b8b8) out of 5 stars Elegant Beethoven, even though it could be more exciting 22 July 2011
By Andrew R. Barnard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Owning Haitink's complete LSO Live set of the Beethoven symphonies, I've been impressed by how he was able to firmly stamp his individuality on every one of them. His approach was one strongly influenced by period accuracy, and there was a wonderful intimacy always present throughout.

And this CD is no exception. Haitink sees the 7th as a symphony filled with a refined grace behind all the brilliance. And while his performance doesn't lack excitement, it's the inner searching that Haitink wants to see brought forth. To put it a bit differently, this sounds more like Beethoven's previous symphony, the "Pastoral", than the earlier 3rd or 5th. The LSO responds in a wonderful way to Haitink, keeping in line with his more laid-back approach while still keeping things moving and interesting. In other words, they don't sit still. What probably ends up striking me the most about this rendition is the love for the music that comes from all those involved.

Having said this, I'm not totally satisfied by this disc. As much as there is to enjoy, I feel that some of the symphonic grandeur behind this work is lost. As beautiful as the playing is, I don't go away as impressed by the structural aspects of the symphony as I would like to. The refined grace is nice, to be sure, but isn't there more to Beethoven than this? Haitink's approach worked wonderfully for him in the "Pastoral", it just doesn't suit as well here. Still, Haitink is still involved, and what he does have to say is interesting. I'll certainly keep listening to it for the enjoyment that is there.

The Triple Concerto that concludes the disc is a somewhat austere work, one I've heard many critics accuse of being a bore. I don't think that this is as good a piece as the one that precedes it on this disc, but I think it is still a great piece, even if is tough to grasp. Our soloists are top notch, particularly Lars Vogt on the piano. Like the 7th Symphony, the performance is not one that focuses on big sound and drama, but the sheer beauty that is released makes this work quite interesting. The approach works a bit better here than in the 7th, even though more punch wouldn't have hurt. It takes much more than one listen to get what Beethoven was trying to say, and there' s no reason why this recording isn't good enough for you to spend hours listening and re-listening to it.

All said and done, this is a fine disc. The Beethoven symphonies are too great for you to only one set, but there's enough here to make it worth your time, even though it isn't perfect.
HASH(0x93732f24) out of 5 stars Splendid 7th and the fastest triple concerto I have listened to 7 Dec. 2011
By Vikram Ramanathan - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This lean and mean orchestra has the right orchestral density to make this rendition of Beethoven's 7th spectacular. Clean, sparse, tonally simple and clear timpani. String phrases are quick, clear cut, and straightforward. The orchestra feels more stripped than the modern orchestra; the dense modern orchestral sound is replaced by a lean & focused sound. The orchestral sound is clear, sparse, articulate, harmonically contained & sharp; clear and short notes. Haitink's reading is such that the note is played quick and fast. Coming to the Triple concerto, you can actually dance along to the first movement. This is a light hearted and focused reading. I like this take. May not seem, as serious and introverted a reading as you might be accustomed to if you listen to some of the other well-known recordings. This style and tempo really makes the 2nd movement of the triple concerto feel very different from what I am used to hearing. The quick speed surprised me at first but as I listened to it, I found it charming and cute. This isn't your normal imposing and brooding triple concerto. To some it might feel like Haitink does not bring about the depth or emotion to this concerto because of the quick and lean style, but it is certainly very interesting. I cannot call this the definitive 7th and Triple concerto, but it is certainly a very interesting one to have in your Beethoven collection...hence 4 stars. Try this out.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x938b33cc) out of 5 stars The pace has picked up, but Haitink remains rather faceless 9 April 2008
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This live Beethoven Seventh falls into the same category as those from Abbado and Rattle from 2000 -- a mainstream conductor is sprucing up Beethoven in keeping with current notions. All three go for leaner textures, faster tempos, and a marked absence of depth or any kind of searching below the surfae. They performances are cut from the same cloth, although Haitink's is the best for recorded sound, and his LSO musicians respond somewhat more enthusiastically.

Yet this remains a faceless approach -- you'd mistake his Seventh for almost anyone else's who has a small tilt toward historical practice. The main departure from tradition is that the Allegretto has sped up, and so has the Trio to the Scherzo. The finale whisks along, but unlike Karajan, who also rode the whirlwind, everything here sounds lighlty tossed off, for better or worse.

I was curious about the Triple Cto. because among traditionalists the lightest and leanest recording came from Fricsay on DG decades ago. The standard recommendation, Karajan with Richter, Rostropovich, and Oistrakh, pursues a traditional course and features virtuosic romantic soloists. Here we get two orchestral principals with the addition of Lars Vogt as pianist. Haitink begins in the same brisk manner as in the symphony, but the telltale sign is always the entry of the three soloists. To my disppointment they are recessed and bland. The effect is more like a Mozart Sinfonia concertante than a romantic conerto -- presumably that's what Haitink and co. are aiming at.

Vogt is the most decisive of the three and so strongly outplays the violin and cello (the latter is very timid) that it's a mismatch. But everyone plays beautifully, and if you're not looking for originality or depth, this light and lyrical account is fine on its own terms. In the same style the Fricsay is more exciting, however.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback