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Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 7
 
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Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 7

18 Nov. 2009 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
10:50
30
2
8:35
30
3
5:28
30
4
6:08
30
5
13:13
30
6
7:43
30
7
8:52
30
8
8:26
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 8 Jan. 2008
  • Release Date: 18 Nov. 2009
  • Label: RCA Red Seal
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:09:15
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002YSLW3K
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 267,183 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Järvi's Fourth is a tremendous success. He achieves absolute clarity and makes sure that every note can be heard, but with no loss of impact. On the contrary, the dark hues of the Introduction come across more vividly than ever before: just listen to the dark, rasping fp diminuendo in the horns at bar 13 and be assured that you are in for something very special indeed. In the main Allegro, the wonderful articulation of the syncopated ,bridge' theme in the woodwinds (figure B in the score) is a special delight. The Adagio goes at an ideally flowing pace, and it features the most clearly articulated and recorded climax ever (bars 50-53): what an impact the double basses make when they finally share the repeated notes of the other strings in bar 53!. The Scherzo is vividly done, with a beautiful crescendo from the horns at the very end, and the Finale is playful and energetic. This sounds like chamber music for a full orchestra: a piece like the second final for Opus 130 comes to mind. Again, Järvi offers a reading rich in clarity and colourful detail: listen for instance to the triplets in the second clarinet at bars 215 and following. In all, the Fourth has been extremely lucky on disc, with recent successes such as Haitink's fabulous LSO Live recording, but Järvi just beats them all.
However, the Seventh is less sucessful: here, the smallish orchestral forces seem to lack weight, and Järvi's approach is a bit unsmiling and inhibited. Compare the rather stiff opening of the Allegretto second movement to that by Kleiber (DG): that more or less sums up the difference.
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