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The Bed I made by [Whitehouse, Lucie]
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The Bed I made Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 216 customer reviews

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Length: 321 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

'Whitehouse writes marvellously in an emotionally hypersensitive, lyrical, Maggie O'Farrell sort of way' Wendy Holden, Daily Mail 'Playing the reader like a trout on a line, Whitehouse creates an ever-shifting tale in which a sure sense of time and place hunkers down alongside a grinding feeling of impending doom ... Much like du Maurier's Cornwall and Tartt's Vermont, Whitehouse's Isle of Wight is as significant a character as any human within its confines ... Whitehouse has written a smart, flirtatious game of lit-tease. The reader is kept speculating but information is never held back to the extent that it looks like authorial scheming. The result is gripping, believable and, at its best, unnerving' Independent on Sunday 'Expert story-weaver Lucie Whitehouse ... compelling' InStyle 'A post-Du Maurier domestic gothic thriller in the Maggie O'Farrell/ Sophie Hannah mode. Whitehouse is a skilful, attentive writer' Guardian

About the Author

Lucie Whitehouse was born in Warwickshire in 1975, read Classics at Oxford University and now lives in London. She is author of The House at Midnight.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2034 KB
  • Print Length: 321 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Paperbacks; 1 edition (15 Jun. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003S3R81A
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 216 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #72,788 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
SPOILERS CONTAINED HEREIN! My mum lent me this book because I'd just returned from a holiday in the lovely Isle of Wight (a most beautiful place) and I've got to say that the main thing I enjoyed in the book was revisiting the locations I am now familiar with through Whitehouse's prose; particularly being as we stayed in some eerily similar cottages (and encountered an equally eerily similar cat as the one in Whitehouse's novel) during our hols, in Yarmouth. (It made me question if the author had stayed there too whilst writing her book!)

Sadly, for me, that's where the charm of the book began and ended. The main character is introspective, self-pitying, carping and basically deserves everything she gets. If there ever was a singularly appropriate title for a novel, it's the one for this book, because the heroine in it, has definitely made her own bed and brought all of her misfortunes upon herself.

So the slightly unlikely premise is as follows: Kate (a woman prone to drinking too much, over self-analysing, dread of being alone and overreacting, as we are told during the first few pages) meets Richard, an arrogant, confident man who I couldn't make a clear picture of in my mind from the author's description, but a great deal of her account of him is based around his eyebrows, so I kind of just pictured a dark bloke with satanic eyebrows (picture him with me if you will...) and goes home to bed with him on the first night of meeting. A slightly strange relationship then develops between the pair, whereby anyone with one iota of sense can see that Richard is a power-hungry psychopath intent on controlling Katie's every move, and Katie believes she's in love with him.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'd heard such good things about Lucie Whitehouse's "The Bed I Made", but it turned out to be a wet blanket. I couldn't even decide what genre of fiction it's supposed to be. With its seemingly interminable descriptions of the Isle of Wight landscape, it's far too plodding to be a thriller. `Ah well then, it'll be literary fiction,' you might say. But the writing, though good, just isn't captivating enough for literary fiction. If you want something to send you to sleep, don't hesitate to read it. If you're looking for a pacier psychological thriller with a literary flavour, I would recommend Lesley Glaister's "Nina Todd Has Gone" or Michele Martineau's "The Cuckoo Trap".
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Kate meets and falls in love with Richard .... the book starts with her escape to the Isle of Wight. What happened between Kate and Richard and why is she obsessed with the boating accident on the island? A tense romantic thriller that slowly unveils Kate's past with Richard and delves deep into their relationship. Along the way we witness Kate starting a new life on the island and her path crosses with Peter several times .... well worth reading!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book and thought it was well written it took me a while to get into it but once I had I was hooked
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was well written, however the story line was predicable enough. You knew something was going to happen to the female character in the book , and it wasn't going to be good and the ending was predictable as well. But it was readable and I did finish it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
From the word "go", I was hooked on this book.

It keeps you on the edge of the seat and is the sort of book that I was desperate to get back to.

You are constantly waiting for something horrible to happen and hoping for the best.

It doesn't disappoint.
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Format: Paperback
The Bed I Made is just as tense and atmospheric as Lucie's previous book but I would say that this one has a much darker and more dangerous edge to it.

One fateful night, Kate meets Richard in a Soho bar and they begin a reckless and intense relationship. However, eighteen months later we follow Kate as she flees the familiarity of her London life for the obscurity of a rented cottage on the Isle of Wight. It is winter on this tiny island and Kate finds herself extremely isolated. She learns about the disappearance of local woman, Alice Frewin who many suggest has taken her own life. Kate is drawn to Alice's story, it almost provides a distraction yet she still cannot escape the clutches of Richard who has not given up on finding out where she has escaped to.

Lucie Whitehouse begins building the chilling atmosphere from the first page of the book. The story builds slowly like the fog that rolls in and envelops Kate's cottage on the island. We begin to gain an understanding of why she is so frightened of this man who she had once loved and admired. There were times when I did not want to read on as I was frightened as to what was lurking around the next corner but I could not stop myself from turning the pages.

Critics have compared Lucie Whitehouse to Daphne Du Maurier and I believe that this is a fair assertion, even more so after reading this second book. Through her clever use of language, Whitehouse creates a chilling and sinister atmosphere as she gradually builds up the suspense. Words carry a lot of power throughout the story. Other than Kate's memories, Richard's main presence is via text messages and emails that she receives whilst on the island.
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