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on 21 July 2017
Good book,
Only problem is that 'my dad' now deceased, was a great chess player that used to win competitions.
So you can see my concerns, there is an assumption that the author could have out smarted him !
P.S. anybody know a good Medium, so I can put it to the test ?
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on 5 June 2013
This has been really popular with my kids and keeps getting dipped back into. It was a last minute buy but I thought I would review as it really seems to have caught their imagination. Can't think why...
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on 11 December 2017
Great pressie for a chess mad 9yr old!
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on 27 July 2017
very pleased
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on 10 December 2017
Bought this for my 8 year old kid so that he could read it and learn ways to beat me at chess. The notation in the book is not suitable for a child. I expected this to be a chess book for kids. It's not.
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on 18 July 2017
Nice book
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on 21 November 2017
Son aged 12 loved this. Easy and interesting to read.
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on 24 June 2008
An interesting presentation of various checkmates, using typical positions to explain the 'how to' without getting bogged down in too much detail. An excellent read and highly recommended.
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on 4 June 2003
At my level (around 1200-1300 elo) this is a little marvel! For starters the price is good and it's a quality hardback which is rare for chess books. Unlike the majority of chess manuals this is a doddle to read and doesn't require a photographic memory or multiple chess sets to work through!
The title is a little misleading though. This is basically 50 checkmating patterns, 1 per page. I would suggest reading and re-reading this book until those patterns are burned into your memory. You'll be suprised at how often the opportunity to use these checkmate motifs will appear in your games.
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on 28 February 2013
Humans have an innate capacity to spot visual patterns, eg peoples' faces, trees and a clock face. Try covering up a traditional watch with your other hand, ask an adult to to look at the back of your hand and move it quickly away and back over the watch, giving him or her the merest glimpse of the watch, then ask the person what time it said. 9 out of 10 will get it right. The point is that this sort of mental activity is automatic, extremely quick and unthinking (see "Thinking, fast and slow" by D Kahneman for a very readable account of a lifetime of study in this field.). These instant reactions can also be wrong, but they can be practised and trained. Strong chess players spot patterns very quickly then get their thinking caps on and calculate whether their first impression is workable. "How to beat your Dad at chess" is one of few books to consciously harness this approach. It classifies mates by pattern and accompanies each with lively, readable text to confirm the "get your thinking cap on" part.

Don't be put off by the title, this excellent book is neither condescending nor patronising.

Worth every penny.
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