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Beast Must Die [DVD] [1974] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

3.3 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

Price: £10.71
Only 10 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.
5 new from £7.14 6 used from £6.39 1 collectible from £9.99
Region 1 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the UK [Region 2]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
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£10.71 Only 10 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.

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Product details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: MPI Home Video
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0007VY558
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 115,900 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Region 0 - not Region 1 -

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
I love this film! It was`nt really meant to be taken that seriously back in 1974 when it first appeared, almost 30 years on, it can only get better! The parts that are meant to be funny are good, the parts that are NOT are even more hilarious! You can't help but think that everyone on set had a great time making this film and it shows. Highlights include; Peter Cushing's dodgy accent, meant to be German but frequently sounding Indian, Calvin Lockhart's accent and mannerisms, The werewolf who looks more like an Alsation dog, the dodgy (but funny) bad acting in general, groovy 70's tunes plus fab clothing and to cap it all the legendary 'Werewolf break'. You`ll have to watch the film to know what I'm on about. All in all, a great comedy/horror with groovy 70's funk capped with a copious amount of cheese, making for an entertaining and hilarious night in front of the box. Highly recommended.
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Format: VHS Tape
I like this film so much because it's so unusual. A millionaire businessman and big game hunter invites a number of guests to his secluded mansion. He knows one of them is a werewolf,but not which one,they've all got a suspicious past. One by one they start to die. The opening sequence will surprise you ,it did me. Some of the acting isn't up to De Niro standard but I thoroughly recommend it.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
!!! WARNING. MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS. !!!

Big game hunter Tom Newcliffe(Calvin Lockhart) invites a motley bunch of people to his isolated mansion for a most dangerous game. One of his guests, all who have dark secrets to hide, is a werewolf and Newcliffe is determined to hunt him or her down, conducting a series of elaborate tests to force the werewolf into revealing their identity. Meanwhile, the killings start...
As Amicus Films' very last foray into horror, 'The Beast Must Die' is a thoroughly enjoyable film, complete with groovy 70's soundtrack, a wonderful 'Guess The Werewolf' thirty second break and less than convincing effects, as dogs are used as cheap werewolf substitutes.
Lockhart gives a full blooded performance as Newcliffe, becoming increasingly O.T.T as the body count rises. Balancing this highly enjoyable if overripe turn are more measured performances from Peter Cushing as Professor Lundgren, Charles Gray at his pithy best as shady diplomat Bennington and Anton Diffring as Newcliffe's employee Pavel, watching all the action on CCTV. Interesting to see a young Michael Gambon appear as pianist Jan Gilmore.
Despite over using the plot device of Newcliffe chasing down the werewolf in the countryside around his mansion, 'The Beast Must Die' is a relatively tense affair, full of false fangs and red herrings.
The 'Werewolf Break' may be a gimmick but it is what this film is probably best remembered for. An alternate cut of the film titled 'Black Werewolf' to probably cash in on Blaxploitation cinema, omits the Werewolf break entirely, a crime in itself.
After this film, Amicus made their way into fantasy films with their 'lost world' triology, all with Doug McClure as the not so dashing lead.
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Format: DVD
This full length feature from a studio best known for its portmanteau anthologies misfires in some respects, but it's still an enjoyable horror flick. Mixing the country house mystery with a werewolf horror, we have a mismatched selection of characters, and are expected to guess which is the wereworlf. There's even an amazingly cheesy "werewolf break" where a narrator tells us we have 30 seconds to guess! I haven't seen anything like that in a film before or since. The film mixes this with high-tech gadgets, with sophisticated surveillance equipment in the country house. It reminded me of "The Prisoner" in that respect. There werewolf itself is clearly just an alsation, but no matter, if you take this flick for what it is you'll enjoy it.
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Format: DVD
Whilst once one of the most prolific film houses to capitalise on the UK horror movie boom, the output of Milton Subotsky and Max J. Rosenberg's Amicus Productions is viewed today with a degree of sniffy contempt by many critics, and even their kindest and most forgiving fans have to admit that, when it comes to scaring audiences, many of their movies never really cut it. Lacking the willingness to temper good taste with boundary-pushing boldness in the way that the earliest Hammer classics did, and in no way as graphic and disturbing as the best output from other contemporary production companies like Tigon (Witchfinder General, Blood on Satan's Claw), the idea that any Amicus film ever had horror-hungry cinemagoers queuing around the block to see some 'X' certificate thrills seems almost silly today. Their best movies are perhaps their most subtle and visually inventive (such as 1965's The Skull), though it is for their distinctly hit-and-miss portmanteau efforts (of which they produced seven) that they are best remembered. However, as the 1960s turned into the 1970s and the fortunes of the British film industry began to falter, Amicus too started to go the way of all flesh as (like Hammer) they ran out of ideas and (like Hammer) churned out a few ill-advised mash-ups that dipped into other genres for inspiration whilst trying to keep their horror flame alight.
Which brings us to 1974's The Beast Must Die, a movie which, in its own quiet way, was just as much of an experiment as Hammer's infamous The Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires from the same year.
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