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Batman R.I.P Paperback – 18 Jun 2010

3.7 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; 01 edition (18 Jun. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401225764
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401225766
  • Product Dimensions: 16.9 x 0.9 x 25.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 49,595 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review


"[Grant Morrison is] comics's high shaman."--WASHINGTON POST

"[A] comic legend."--ROLLING STONE


[Grant Morrison is] comics s high shaman. WASHINGTON POST
[A] comic legend. ROLLING STONE"

About the Author

Grant Morrison has been working with DC Comics for more than twenty years, beginning with his legendary runs on the revolutionary titles ANIMAL MAN and DOOM PATROL. Since then he has written numerous best-sellers including JLA, BATMAN and "New X-Men" as well as the critically acclaimed creator-owned series THE INVISIBLES, SEAGUY, THE FILTH, WE3 and JOE THE BARBARIAN. Morrison has also expanded the borders of the DC Universe in the award-winning pages of SEVEN SOLDIERS, ALL-STAR SUPERMAN, FINAL CRISIS and BATMAN, INC., and he is currently reinventing the Man of Steel in the all-new ACTION COMICS. In his secret identity, Morrison is a counterculture spokesperson, a musician, an award-winning playwright and a chaos magician. He is also the author of the "New York Times" best-seller "Supergods," a groundbreaking psycho-historic mapping of the superhero as a cultural organism. He divides his time between his homes in Los Angeles and Scotland. Tony S. Daniel decided to be a comics artist in the 8th grade, and he hasn t looked back since. After making his professional debut in 1993 on Comico s "The Elementals," he has contributed work to Marvel s "X-Force" and Image s "Spawn: Bloodfeud" as well as writing and illustrating his creator-owned titles "Silke," "The Tenth," "Humankind," "Adrenalynn" and "F5" the last two of which led him, for a time, into the alternate reality known as Hollywood. After being lured back into comics to work with writer Geoff Johns on DC s TEEN TITANS, Daniel went on to draw the final three issues of FLASH: THE FASTEST MAN ALIVE before landing his dream job pencilling the Dark Knight s adventures in BATMAN. The Batcave is, he reports, surprisingly cozy."


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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This volume reprints Batman #676-683 and DC Universe #0. It appears to continue from the preceding volume, so this story might be confusing if you haven't read The Black Glove (which I haven't). On the other hand, as this is Grant Morrison, it might just be confusing for the sake of it. Anyway, Batman appears to be infatuated with yet another female, Jezebel Jet, while under psychological and physical attack from the Black Glove organisation. He is captured, drugged, and released onto the streets of Gotham while under the influence. He appears to hallucinate the presence of Bat-Mite (referred to occasionally as `might' - a typo or a message?) and starts to `remember' some 1950s adventures. It all apparently turns out to be part of a psychological defence mechanism, and we get to see some interesting back-story of his early training, while Robin, Nightwing and friends take care of the enemy henchmen. It all climaxes with the Joker doing what he does best, and Talia al' Ghul demonstrating that diplomatic passports don't work against angry wives... It is a sometimes confusing story, as I have said, but if you persevere, you might work it out (though you can never tell with Grant Morrison if you are supposed to). There is a second, two-part story, which takes place within the Final Crisis, and explains what Batman was doing during his capture and his escape and final confrontation with Darkseid. This might be worth five stars if I thought I followed it correctly, and if I had read the preceding volume, I might have. But then again, if I had, I might have reduced the score to three... This volume is definitely a personal experience.
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I really enjoyed this book, but its important to have a working knowledge of Batman history and to have read the book Batman: The Black Glove as this is basically its sequel. The storyline is rather complex and is definitely not a jumping on point for new readers and even experienced readers may not like or understand the writing style. On a personal level I loved the substance here, Batman springs a trap years in the making that targets him on every level and takes advantage of every little crack in his armour in the most horrible way possible. Bane may have broke Batman physically years ago, but this story tells of how Bruce Wayne was broken.
The story also ties in with Final Crisis at the end and bridges the gap between the two story lines and also enhances Batman's appearance during Final Crisis showing us in more detail what he endures. A fantastic story, great art and a real landmark piece of Batman history, and if thats not enough to draw you in then how about a book that also contains Joker in his own little mystery, what does he really think of the Black Glove and Batman?
Contains Batman #676 - #683, DC Universe #0
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There's no mainstream superhero character whose portrayal causes as much furore amongst comic book readers than Batman. No other hero has as many varied 'takes on' or as many opinions amongst his fans of how he should be written. The work Scott Snyder is currently doing with the character is for many the kind of story lines that they feel our hero should be finding himself in: gritty, urban, yet imaginative and mysterious - hence, the current run's success. What's important to remember though is in a 70+ year history the Bat-Man has had many incarnations and riffs on how he is portrayed; both on page and screen.
There are a number of Batman's that are burned deeply in the collective psyche and to say that there's a correct one is to miss the point. For some Batman will always be the goofy take seen in the 1960's TV show and for others the brooding and 'realistic' take in Frank Miller's 'Dark Knight Returns' and 'Batman - Year One', will always be the blueprint to work from. And that seems to be the prevalent attitude nowadays when a Batman comic is written: is he believable? We only have to look at Nolan's trio of films to see where the current zeitgeist is - you can leave all the larger than life goings on to Superman, Green Lantern and The Flash.
What's forgotten, though, is no matter what you do with him there is a weirdness and preposterousness that runs through Batman as much as any other mainstream DC hero. It's this, that I believe, Grant Morrison understands implicitly throughout his run. Look at the most famous rogues gallery in comics: Joker, Penguin, Riddler, pantomime villains, all. And when we start looking at second tier villains like Killer Croc and Clayface we are hardly in the realms of the real.
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Format: Paperback
wow. Morrison, a genius in his own right has managed to craft a tale that makes 70 years of batman all fit into a 15 year career. It's fantastic and makes you believe the silver age was all part of Morrison's epic, defining saga. It is recommended you read The Black Casebook and Batman and Son and Batman the black glove prior to this (in said order) as without this, you will be confused. If you are patient and slightly intelligent, you will enjoy this clever tale that changes everything you thought you knew about the Batman, and the limitations of story telling.
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