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4.6 out of 5 stars
42
4.6 out of 5 stars
Batman: Knightfall Vol. 1
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£13.29


on 28 September 2017
As someone who had never read this collection the stories are awesome. Banes introduction is excellent, highly recommended.
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on 28 May 2015
One of my favourite Batman trilogies. Nice collection!
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 10 May 2012
***For the time being, Amazon hasn't listed the correct cover for this new version which is causing a little confusion, so I've uploaded the actual cover myself which can be seen above***

First things first: although DC is re-releasing the Knightfall saga (and at 1800-odd pages, it is undoubtedly a saga) to tie in with The Dark Knight Rises and however loosely that film is rumoured to adapt it, this first volume (of three) new 2012 editions does not include the previously excluded chapters that the older trades (Broken Bat,Who Rules the Night and Knightsend) left out with the exception of Vengeance Of Bane #1 which opens the book. What this 640-page monster contains is, precisely, the first two of those trades I just mentioned and Vengeance Of Bane. Now, if you already have those books and you want to get your hands on the big man's origin story, it's also recently been reprinted in Batman Versus Bane though that version is on glossy paper and this book is printed entirely on stock not unlike a regular novel. Some people have balked at this decision on the forums, and having read the book just this week I'm happily confident stating that it is NOT the same quality as the DC Showcase/ Marvel Essential lines and the colours are plenty vibrant and the pages of decent thickness. The massive paperback suffers from a little gutter loss on first glance, though you can pull the pages wide enough apart to see every detail without creasing the spine which, as we all know, is simply not an option.

What of the story itself? I said in another review that I tend to think of this as the big dumb blockbuster Batman tale, with an onslaught of action and not a massive amount of depth. Again, if you've chanced across any of my other reviews this'll sound familiar, but I see it as a natural physical culmination to the trend writers were indulging back then of taking Batman to new extremes and breaking him in new ways mentally (essential reading? Try A Death in the Family,The Cult and Venom). As with Superman's death and Spider-Man's existential crises with clones, the 1990s was a time for big shake ups in comics status quos and this was the `event', as they say now, that kicked it all off. This first volume presents somewhere north of twenty issues and only captures a third of the bigger picture, but to put is briefly, Bane (tragically mishandled in other media) orchestrates a breakout at Arkham which results in Batman running a gauntlet of sorts before he challenges him himself, famously breaking his spine in Wayne Manor before one of his protégés takes over the bat-mantle (years before Bruce was sent back in time...) and commences an altogether more violent campaign of justice on Gotham's streets. The next two volumes (Knightquest and the new edition of Knightsend) will deal with Bruce's recovery, both of his physical wellbeing and of the cape and cowl. In this book, we're treated to Bane's machinations as Batman deals with the likes of Amygdala, Arnold "The Ventriloquist" Wesker, Joker and Scarecrow and, erm, Film Freak. After the manor incident Jean-Paul Valley takes to the streets to provide a sort of payback for Bane while giving criminals a fairly harsh time before designing a spiffing new 90s costume/ armour covered in spikes and teeming with gadgets. At one stage, during his first encounter with Scarecrow in Shadow Of The Bat #16-18, he welcomes Crane's fear gas claiming "What am I afraid of? I WANT to know". This young man, it seems clear, is not mentally healthy, and his spiral into half-madness under the guise of the Dark Knight is fascinating and more than keeps things interesting after the breaking of the Bat halfway through.

Like I said earlier, there's not a Killing Joke/ Year One level of re-readability to it when it comes to appreciation of depth or lasting impact, but it's a riot through and through and compelling enough to get through in one sitting. The writing is just above par and the artwork firmly rooted to its time but these, for me at least, are not complaints. I don't expect comics from 20 years ago to read like they were written by Brian Bendis and boast computer-aided colouring, and you shouldn't either.

In terms of presentation, the covers from the original issues (often courtesy of Kelley Jones) are included before the issues themselves which is uncommon for DC and aesthetically very pleasing. The quality of the printing is high enough to satisfy me, and I imagine most people would be happy with the quality of reproduction. For those who may complain at the lack of glossy paper, I'd say the privilege of getting 640 pages of full-colour comics at this price more than makes up for the book not feeling like something that would cost tree times as much. Besides, these are older comics - they wouldn't have been printed on gloss anyway.

Should you get this new edition? A) If you haven't any of the previous collections, absolutely. I'm a big fan, and happy to recommend. B) If you HAVE the previous collections and suffer a crippling need for synchronicity which is likely to manifest when you buy the next two volumes, absolutely. That's me, right there. C) If you're not bothered about the new books not matching your older trades, then no. Pick up Batman Vs Bane, which also prints a later Bane four-parter featuring Ra's Al Ghul, and all you'll be missing are the covers.

If you followed my reviews from the older editions to here, hope it proved helpful!
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on 8 September 2013
KNIGHTFALL - Vol 1.

Volume one represents the first part of the Knightfall trilogy and is followed by Knightquest and Knightsend, all averaging over 600 pages making for an 1,800 page epic storyline. Volume one was originally published as two separate volumes, 'Broken Bat' and who 'Rules the Night', what these editions didn't have was the 61 page 'Vengeance of Bane' origin story which is included here and really kick-starts the saga by explaining Bane's motive and ambition. Thereafter, the content is identical to the previous editions, charting Batman's infamous first battle with Bane, Batman's subsequent reinvention and the resulting rematch. Bane's scheme of using the full arsenal of Batman's enemies against him brings all the big names into the frame. The sub-stories are still great and all contribute to the overall story arc. The primary story arc is terrific and a genuine touchstone in comic history. Considering this is part one of a trilogy, however, the ending doesn't leave many loose ends other than how the new Batman will cope with the responsibility of the mantle of the bat.

The paper and print quality are both excellent. All three volumes are well bound. The only issue here being that all the real drama of the Knightfall saga is effectively captured within this one volume. Purists will probably be unable to resist collecting all three volumes but in truth there Vols 2 and 3 are a little padded out, particularly Vol. 2, and Bane isn't seen again.
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on 7 June 2015
An essential Batman story. Featuring loads of Batmans rogues gallery and introducing us to evil mastermind Bane.
Kicking off the Knightfall series with a strong powerful start. Bane as one mission in life, to break the Batman. And hes not going to play nice to do it. After watching Batman and hunting him like an Animal, Bane kicks of his master plan to defeat Batman physically and psychologically by organising a mass break out of Arkham Asylum, undoing all of Batmans hard life long work and causing instant mayhem on the streets of gotham as every villain the city has ever faced strikes simultaneously. Batman needs to run Banes gauntlet, Protect his city and still have enough spirit to face Bane at the end of the day.and this is only half of the book. I wont summarise the second half as I cant without containing spoilers. Just trust me that the whole book is epic.

The plot is masterfully written and doesn't feel rushed in the slightest. modern day arc story lines are usually over after a few issues and crossovers, but this book shows that quantity can also mean quality when done well. No story is perfect all the way through (except Batman: Killing Joke) and although this does ride a high through the majority it does have weaker moments such as the flash back confrontation with Two-Face that doesn't really fit in with the story at all. This aside there's something in this book for everybody, almost every villain makes an appearance, with Joker still at his strongest and Ventriloquist at his funniest, epic fight scenes and dark emotional scenes, this book is so perfectly balanced and filled with works or pure gold. Its not surprising this book is a rightful classic Batman story.

The art varies as to be expected in a huge arc like this which crosses over comics. Its mostly strong throughout and creates some great dramatic scenes and atmospheres. Graham Nolan, Jim Aparo and Jim Balent do a fantastic job and provide great character detailing bringing drawings to life and pouring emotion into the cast. The art is how ever weak and blurry during the Showcase 93 issues making it the weakest plot wise and art wise.

Bane is portrayed as a physical and psychological threat, using everything at his disposal to break Batman really distinguishes Bane from everyone else in Batmans rogues gallery. Im just very disappointed that after this story hes never again portrayed quite the same way and is constantly portrayed as nothing but a strong arm thug and defeated easily by Batman.
Bruce Wayne shown at his most vulnerable here is pitied by readers as you see him falling further and further into decline. Its great to see Batman at his most human and reminds readers that behind that mask he is just a man and every man has limits even a Batman. This is the start of a long story for Bruce and Batman, and after this book Batman still has a long way to fall and he declines even more in Knightfall Volume Two.

A must read for everyone and anyone. The original Batman story arc and probably the best one even to this day.
Contains Batman #491 - #500, Detective Comics #659 - #666, Showcase 93 #7 - #8, Batman: Shadow of the Bat #16 - #18, Batman: Vengeance of Bane #1
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 24 May 2012
First things first: although DC is re-releasing the Knightfall saga (and at 1800-odd pages, it is undoubtedly a saga) to tie in with The Dark Knight Rises and however loosely that film is rumoured to adapt it, this first volume (of three) new 2012 editions does not include the previously excluded chapters that the older trades (Broken Bat,Who Rules the Night and Knightsend) left out with the exception of Vengeance Of Bane #1 which opens the book. What this 640-page monster contains is, precisely, the first two of those trades I just mentioned and Vengeance Of Bane. Now, if you already have those books and you want to get your hands on the big man's origin story, it's also recently been reprinted in Batman Versus Bane though that version is on glossy paper and this book is printed entirely on stock not unlike a regular novel. Some people have balked at this decision on the forums, and having read the book just this week I'm happily confident stating that it is NOT the same quality as the DC Showcase/ Marvel Essential lines and the colours are plenty vibrant and the pages of decent thickness. The massive paperback suffers from a little gutter loss on first glance, though you can pull the pages wide enough apart to see every detail without creasing the spine which, as we all know, is simply not an option.

What of the story itself? I said in another review that I tend to think of this as the big dumb blockbuster Batman tale, with an onslaught of action and not a massive amount of depth. Again, if you've chanced across any of my other reviews this'll sound familiar, but I see it as a natural physical culmination to the trend writers were indulging back then of taking Batman to new extremes and breaking him in new ways mentally (essential reading? Try A Death in the Family,The Cult and Venom). As with Superman's death and Spider-Man's existential crises with clones, the 1990s was a time for big shake ups in comics status quos and this was the `event', as they say now, that kicked it all off. This first volume presents somewhere north of twenty issues and only captures a third of the bigger picture, but to put is briefly, Bane (tragically mishandled in other media) orchestrates a breakout at Arkham which results in Batman running a gauntlet of sorts before he challenges him himself, famously breaking his spine in Wayne Manor before one of his protégés takes over the bat-mantle (years before Bruce was sent back in time...) and commences an altogether more violent campaign of justice on Gotham's streets. The next two volumes (Knightquest and the new edition of Knightsend) will deal with Bruce's recovery, both of his physical wellbeing and of the cape and cowl. In this book, we're treated to Bane's machinations as Batman deals with the likes of Amygdala, Arnold "The Ventriloquist" Wesker, Joker and Scarecrow and, erm, Film Freak. After the manor incident Jean-Paul Valley takes to the streets to provide a sort of payback for Bane while giving criminals a fairly harsh time before designing a spiffing new 90s costume/ armour covered in spikes and teeming with gadgets. At one stage, during his first encounter with Scarecrow in Shadow Of The Bat #16-18, he welcomes Crane's fear gas claiming "What am I afraid of? I WANT to know". This young man, it seems clear, is not mentally healthy, and his spiral into half-madness under the guise of the Dark Knight is fascinating and more than keeps things interesting after the breaking of the Bat halfway through.

Like I said earlier, there's not a Killing Joke/ Year One level of re-readability to it when it comes to appreciation of depth or lasting impact, but it's a riot through and through and compelling enough to get through in one sitting. The writing is just above par and the artwork firmly rooted to its time but these, for me at least, are not complaints. I don't expect comics from 20 years ago to read like they were written by Brian Bendis and boast computer-aided colouring, and you shouldn't either.

In terms of presentation, the covers from the original issues (often courtesy of Kelley Jones) are included before the issues themselves which is uncommon for DC and aesthetically very pleasing. The quality of the printing is high enough to satisfy me, and I imagine most people would be happy with the quality of reproduction. For those who may complain at the lack of glossy paper, I'd say the privilege of getting 640 pages of full-colour comics at this price more than makes up for the book not feeling like something that would cost tree times as much. Besides, these are older comics - they wouldn't have been printed on gloss anyway.

Should you get this new edition? A) If you haven't any of the previous collections, absolutely. I'm a big fan, and happy to recommend. B) If you HAVE the previous collections and suffer a crippling need for synchronicity which is likely to manifest when you buy the next two volumes, absolutely. That's me, right there. C) If you're not bothered about the new books not matching your older trades, then no. Pick up Batman Vs Bane, which also prints a later Bane four-parter featuring Ra's Al Ghul, and all you'll be missing are the covers.

If you followed my reviews from the older editions to here, hope it proved helpful!
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on 27 November 2013
This is an oldie but a goodie, having a decent resurgence on the back of The Dark Knight Rises. And so it should, far more in depth than the film with far less plot holes. The dynamic between Batman and Robin alongside Bane's origin story makes this one of the best Batman books going. Also for new fans it is easy to overlook this in a batman universe build by Grant Morrison, who is amazing, but this is proof that good stuff was happening before he got involved. The art work and story are excellent as we see the Batman face off against his entire roster of enemies in glorious detail. Read it and read it now.
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on 3 October 2013
This is one of the most intense, most thrilling Batman graphic novels I have read; it is substantial but with a very dense story. The writing and artwork capture precisely the desperate nature of the story and the feeling that Batman is on the edge. For a new character to the Batman universe, Bane makes an immediately deadly enemy. Unlike Batman's other foes he is smart and far more brutal. And that is something which could easily have made him seem cliché, but thankfully it's not. There are, however, some holes in the story. This volume has been cobbled together to leave out the fact that Batman has already been badly hurt by a previous incident. It also seems unclear at points why the Dark Knight is going after minor foes such as firefly and Amygdala rather than the dozens of far more dangerous villains on the run.
Despite this Knightfall is an absolute must have for Batman fans. And once you read it you will understand just how far it's legacy has stretched in influencing the Dark Knight rises and expanding the lore of the Batman universe.
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on 29 December 2013
For Batman fans ( 10 plus years) this is classic Batman and the basis for the Christopher Nolan Dark Knight trilogy. My son (11yrs) absolutely loved it and is racing through the next installment, never seen him so keen to read!
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on 31 August 2014
Batman and Bane. A psychological action packed thriller where we see the gradual mental and physical breakdown of Batman. Every man has his limits, even Batman. A great, gripping epic tale that I first read way back in 1995! This edition includes the origin of Bane which I hadn't read before and gives greater insight into his character. A must read for Batman and comic fans in general. The inspiration for the last part of the Dark Knight movie trilogy, though I think the book is better. The book also has a fascinating character who is not in the movie - Azrael!
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