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Batman: Hush Paperback – 23 Aug 2004

3.9 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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Paperback, 23 Aug 2004
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Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books Ltd; New edition edition (23 Aug. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184023718X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840237184
  • Product Dimensions: 16.4 x 25.2 x 0.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 605,612 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

" The best Batman book I've read in a long time..." -- The Ultimate Answer October 2004

"Beautifully illustrated...this is Batman at his best." -- Essex Chonicle Oct 14th 2004, review by Matt Adams

'The art is clean and defined and the elegance works in the grand story." -- Leeds Guide 12 Jan- Thurs 27th Jan 2005


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

This collects parts 1-5 of a 12 part story which was the big DC event of 2003. A new villain emerges who appears to be manipulating villains and heroes in a complex plot to trap Batman. Poison Ivy, Catwoman, even Superman are drawn in to bring down the Batman. The artwork is gorgeous, Jim Lee is phenomenal. The plot is drawn out a little, and ending on issue 5 leaves you a little irritated. I bought the two hardcovers but i think you'd be better buying it in paperback and saving a few bob. There are a few additional pages of artwork which are unique to these collections and not released in the original comics.
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This comic book now sold in two graphic novels is one of the best looking Batman books in years. This book was long awaited as it has the collaboration of two of the greatest talents in comics - Jeph Loeb (Superman) & Jim Lee (XMen). It doesnt disappoint. Art is amazing although story does rollercoaster a little too much - nevertheless once I started reading I couldnt put it down. In my opinion shows a side to the Batman that was prevalent in the days of the original Dark Knight Comics. This is what graphic novels are about i.e. - if you dont collect comics - this is the way to go - value for money.
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By Gizzark Henry VINE VOICE on 27 Aug. 2008
Jeph Loeb has a pretty illustrious history in comics as a writer. In Batman alone, he has written the fantastic Batman: Long Halloween (a key inspiration for Batman Begins) and its follow up Dark Victory, two stupendous stories which suggested he'd strike it lucky a third time too. Right?

Wrong. Somewhere between these two books, Jeph Loeb lost his mojo. This first volume of Hush (and why a 12-issue story needed to be published in two volumes of different sizes when even this same writer's previous stuff wasn't is a mystery) begins a rollercoaster story the ending of which you can see from a mile off.

Many of the characters and dialogue styles are identical to those used previously ("no one can resist me" says Poison Ivy. Again.) and the stilted internal monologue that grates. Loeb starts a story that whilst having a few twists you won't see coming and some nice moments (not least the fight with Superman), its villain will be obvious to you before you even know there is one.

The saving grace of all this is one Jim Lee. Possibly the best comic artist active at the moment, he brings to life Loeb's mediocre story with the same effortless, vibrant colour with which he makes the likes of All-Star Batman And Robin forgivable.

Unless you're a Loeb freak or a big fan of Jim Lee's artwork - or simply don't want to think very hard in the course of the story - then Hush is not for you.
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Verified Purchase
This is a clear five star rating in terms of Batman Graphic novels.

The story is outstanding, well paced Detective novel. Jim Lee's art work in both volume 1 and 2 is superb. If you are a Batman fan or a Jim Lee fan this is a must.

Introduces a few new characters and shapes the Batman world a little.

Production is good, image reproduction was sharp and its well bound.
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By A Customer on 18 Aug. 2005
Lets face it, graphic novels are a graphic medium, which means that good art work is equally as important as good writing. Jim Lee is God. that's all there is to it. The man can create pictures that are beyond anything else i've ever seen and Hush really doesn't dissapoint. Combine that with Jeph Loeb and well, it doesn't get that much better. OK, so it doesn't revolutionise the genre but not everything needs to. Sometimes it's good just to read a beautiful and clever piece of work. This is one of those times.
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The story starts with Killer Croc holding a young boy for ransom. Batman saves him (as per usual) but while the Dark Knight is tackling the Croc, Catwoman steals the ransom money. After a chase around the rooftops of Gotham, Batman's batrope is mysteriously cut. The mystery carries on from there.
My main problem with this story is, it could have been told in half the number of pages that is contained in this book.
What I mean by this is, that HUSH is a classic case of the writer bowing to the artist. The story is written as a whole so it takes us around the whole Batman universe and pretty much uses every Batman cliche and villain is can get it's hands on. Why? So Jim Lee can draw them. And my goodness, he draws them well!
I can't fault the art in HUSH, it's gorgeous! Poison Ivy and Killer Croc seem to just leap off the pages at you. The art is HUSH's major strength, but the story is lacking.
Basically, if your new to Batman and don't know much about his history, his villains, his friends, etc. This is an excellent place to start! However, if you're a big fan, you'll probably feel like your being told the same old things all over again. The only interesting thing to be found for more seasoned Batman readers here is the introduction of a new villain, a new twist in the Catwoman/Batman relationship and of course... the artwork.
All in all, a pretty average read.
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Let me just say the art is, as the title of this review states, technically great. It's perhaps a little too exaggerated or macho in places (lots of gritted teeth and muscles, large breasts, etc...), but in general it's very well drawn.

The story is a letdown.

There are just too many characters involved. In an effort to create a grand conspiracy involving secrets and relationships from Batman/Bruce Wayne's past, Jeff Loeb tries to cram in as many enemies and allies as he can. Instead of epic or well woven, it feels bloated and, at times, a little too comical. Superdog's inclusion feels like a fun fan service, but in my opinion it's almost a metaphor for the way the inclusion of so many A and B list character gives the book a slightly ridiculous feel. Some kind of fan convention, or cosplay re-enactment. The tone just seems imbalanced throughout.

The final reveal of the mastermind behind the scheme is one of the most disappointing I've read, too. One villain disappears and is replaced by another In the final moments if the book, and it just doesn't feel weighty enough. It won't be difficult for many to guess who the man behind the bandages is, and it almost feels as if Jeff knew this and throws us a pointlessly curved ball in the finale monents to make up for it.

The book makes an obvious nod to Millar's The Dark Knight Returns when Superman makes his entrance, which is fun but again takes away more than it gives as it feels like it's drawing on another's work to make impact.

It's a fun read overall with se effective moments (the Joker scene particularly), but I honestly can't see how this joins Millar's work as one of the seminal Batman books.

I guess it made more sense at the time.
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