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Bartok: Concerto No. 2 / Eotvos: Seven / Ligeti: Violin Concerto Double CD

4.7 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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£14.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Conductor: Peter Eötvös
  • Composer: Peter Eötvös, Ligeti, Bela Bartok
  • Audio CD (22 Oct. 2012)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Double CD
  • Label: Naive Mid
  • ASIN: B008R5OKH4
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 91,329 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Allegro Non Troppo - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  2. Andante Tranquillo - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  3. Allegro Molto - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  4. First Cadenza - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  5. Second Cadenza - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  6. Third Cadenza - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  7. Fourth Cadenza - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  8. Part II - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra

Disc: 2

  1. Praeludium: Vivacissimo Luminoso - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Ensemble Modern
  2. Aria - Hoquetus - Choral: Andante Con Moto - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Ensemble Modern
  3. Intermezzo: Presto Fluido - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Ensemble Modern
  4. Passacaglia: Lento Intenso - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Ensemble Modern
  5. Appassionato: Agitato Molto - Patricia Kopatchinskaja/Ensemble Modern

Product Description

Product Description

Gramophone Award Winner 2013 - Concerto Catagory and Recording of the Year. This is the 4th recording by Patricia Kopatchinskaja on naïve; the second in the concerto repertoire. The collaboration with conductor/composer Peter Eötvos and the programme is an intense series of connections. Between Bartok, Ligeti, Eotvos and Kopatchinskaja, there are many links: Hungary, the land of the 3 composers featured; Peter Eötvos was the conductor of the first performance of the second version of Ligeti violin concerto, in 1992, with Ensemble Modern; Patricia Kopatchinakaja and Peter Eötvös have been working together for 4 years, performing several concertos, including those recorded here. Beyond those connections, this recording features 2 highs from 20th century violin repertoire and the world premiere recording of Eötvös 'Seven' which refers to the loss of the Columbia space shuttle in 2003, and which caused the death of all seven of its occupants.

Review

***** perf / ***** rec In everything i ve heard her play Patricia Kopatchinskaja marries consummate technical brilliance and an amazing aural imagination with a capacity to bring completely new interpretative perspectives to some very familiar music. This latest marvellously recorded release, featuring three Hungarian violin concertos, may well be her finest achievement to date. --Erik Levi, BBC Music Magazine February 2013

This collection does grab you with its raw emotion and the very rapturous and somewhat exotic sounds that the region typifies. --Audiophile Audition

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I'm not going to say much, as this has just won the Gramophone record of the year, and so will hopefully get all the attention it deserves. Great performers, and Kopatchinskaja nearly levitates at times in her engagement with these three works. Totally absorbing. The Bartók is performed in a rather more "in your face" way than is normally the case, and is all the better for it, although I can assure potential purchasers that the softer passages are really really beautifully done. As for the Ligeti, well, it is in some way a "bonkers" work as we say in the UK, with many jaw-dropping things going on in it, including of course the ocarinas! It is also quite thrilling and moving, sometimes both simultaneously, and you really feel you are in the presence of a truly great piece of recent classical/ art music that's for sure. A masterpiece by a really fantastic crafts person of sound. Eotvos's own piece is actually pretty passionate and engaging too, absolutely not to be skipped over. Stretch your ears, and if you buy this you'll help emphasise that classical music is not all about a quick buck or compromise these days :)
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a Bartok in a thousand. The notes I jotted as I listened include the following...
Nervous energy... Power... Synergy... Tenderness... Orchestral detail... Singing... Raging... Innigkeit... Visionary... Shimmering beauty... Intense sadness... Precision and passion combined... "Speaking" violin tone... There's nothing she can't do, and no risk she takes that doesn't come off... Spiccato like I've never heard it before... GO PATRICIA, GO!!
Maybe you'd better just buy this & listen for yourself!! The Eotvos and Ligeti are very fine too.
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Format: Audio CD
In the preface to the booklet Patricia Kopatchinskaja provides an insight into her experience of recording these three works with Eötvös and Ensemble Modern: "Between heaven and earth, past and future, I sank for a moment into the Hungarian cosmos and sensed whispers, fragments and signs of living and immortal souls. From light and darkness, dream and wakefulness, music burst forth."

It's striking how this trio of Hungarian works for violin and orchestra hold together, musical cohesiveness being attained almost in spite of an aurora of sounds which at times defy comprehension. Perhaps the most apparent link is in the Balkan heritage, the folk influences which permeate each work, animating further mysterious and at times wild musical landscapes. Kopatchinskaja herself was brought up in a Moldovan household where the richness of folk music was all around her (her mother was a violinist and her father a cimbalom player), and indeed these performances perhaps owe more to the Transylvanian mountains and meadows than they do to the concert hall.

Kopatchinskaja approaches the Bartók in the spirit of a gnarled folk-fiddler, albeit with the technique of a virtuoso; her bow alternately inflecting the score with most delicate of gossamer-like whispers contrasted with the coarsest of woody raspings. This is raw and unpolished playing; the traditional salons of the nineteenth century are of another place and another age.

In the Eötvös work, a meditation on the tragic Columbia space mission of 2003 in which all seven of the astronauts died, the music seems to reach upwards from the temporal towards the cosmic, the pattern of seven repeating itself throughout the arrangement of the orchestra as well as in the score.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This disc, well recorded in 2011 and 2012, won the coveted Gramophone award of disc of the year 2013. This will not come as a surprise to anyone purchasing this disc.

The disc couples together three works that are of particular Hungarian significance. Two of these are very recent works by Ligeti (1992) and Eotvos (2007). These are preceded by Bartok's Violin concerto 2, one of last century's finest violin concertos first performed in 1939 and one of the composer's last works.

The Bartok concerto was written at a time when the composer's interest in Hungarian folk styles, both song and dance, had developed far beyond that of being an influence and had progressed into becoming an integral part of the thought processes fundamental to original creations such as this concerto. The Hungarian folk nature of the work informs the shaping of the melody lines and the strongly rhythmical structure of the work, both of which are constantly evolving. This evolution is also the natural result of the variation format of much of the concerto.

The dedicatee of the concerto, Zoltan Szekely, had insisted that Bartok should write a full-blown three movement concerto rather than the set of variations that the composer had originally had in mind. In the event the three movements contain a second movement which is a set of variations and the last movement is a variant of the first movement. In this way both player and composer were accommodated.

Patricia Kopatchinskaja delivers a performance here that has remarkable technical accomplishment in every detail of this demanding work. She also delivers the wildest and most dramatically contrasted reading currently available.
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