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Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra; Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta
 
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Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra; Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta

8 Dec. 1998 | Format: MP3

Ł7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
10:25
30
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6:46
30
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8:04
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4:33
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9:19
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9:09
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6:58
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6:56
30
9
7:16
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 8 Dec. 1998
  • Release Date: 8 Dec. 1998
  • Label: Sony Classical
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:09:26
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00ER4HSDC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Format: Audio CD
4 1/2 stars -- These are pieces that I just never "got" until I heard this CD with Bernstein's recordings from 1959 (Concerto) and 1961 (Music for Strings etc.). Somehow, he led my ear along so that it all made sense. I'm one of these avid listeners who hasn't been musically educated (although I know a lot of incidental stuff about composers, their cultures, their lives, etc.), and so there are some pieces that are canonical that are just hard for me to get a sense of them expressively as wholes. I love Berlioz, but I never "got" the "Fantastique" until I heard John Eliot Gardiner's recording -- then I went back to others, and they made sense! Maybe that'll happen with these Bartok pieces too.

Impressions of the Concerto: textures at different times that remind me of Mahler, Sibelius, Debussy -- but thematic material and an approach to rhythm that's not like any of these and makes this a very distinctive experience. Expressively, I found it quite dark, even though I understand Bartok saw it as proceeding towards a more affirmative kind of expression. Also -- it's constantly surprising without destroying one's sense of its developing coherence. In this respect, it reminded me a bit of Haydn (whom I had recently been listening to), but Haydn's surprises are almost always genial. Bartok's are more troubling or disturbing. But, thanks to Lenny, I now hear it as a great original and substantive piece of work.

The 1959 sound -- recorded in a Brooklyn hotel! -- has been well remastered. It has a three-dimensional feel to it that gets the groupings of instruments in a nice balance, and though it shows its age a bit by sounding raw in some louder moments, it's really very satisfying. I mention this because I don't hear the 1961 sound as being quite as good.
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