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The Bank Holiday Murders: The True Story of the First Whitechapel Murders (Jack the Ripper Book 1) by [Wescott, Tom]
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The Bank Holiday Murders: The True Story of the First Whitechapel Murders (Jack the Ripper Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 913 KB
  • Print Length: 216 pages
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00IIWWS8E
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #127,216 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was in a bit of a dilemma about this one...It is an exceptionally well researched and written book...big plus....but to my mind it may stretch just a tad too far in reaching some of it's conclusions...a minus...

It lacks an index...something of a minus in my mind...but it is exceptionally well referenced...a plus...

But...this book is a quite remarkable re-examination of two of the killings which are often regarded as nothing more than mutually unconnected precursors to the "real" events which followed. The author presents evidence some solid, some implied but undoubtedly convincing, to suggest that not only may the Smith and Tabram murders be mutually connected, (they've certainly a good deal more in common than has previously been believed), but there are clear links through to at least the Nicholls and Chapman murders, and possibly further too...

There are villains to be encountered in this tale as well as victims...some in the most surprising of places...but this isn't a suspect book - nor just an exposé on the cesspool that was the late victorian East End. It's a fascinating lesson in how to assemble the limited evidence, tease out the research and finally draw conclusions from it.

I don't want this to act as a spoiler for any potential reader, so I'll not go into more detail, but suffice it to say that in my humble view this book ought to be required reading for any student of the Whitechapel Murders...any student of real crime for that matter.

So that dilemma? Well anybody who can write so engagingly, make learning such a pleasure, and who can persuade one to escape long-held preconceptions and re-evaluate these early cases with a fresh eye has to have a five, don't they...it's a great book, and frankly I can't wait for the magnum opus the author implies is yet to come...
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is perhaps not a book for the Ripper newbie, but for the long-time student of the case. As someone who has been studying it casually for a couple of decades, I can say that this is the one book that has - while presenting evidence that is unsensational and absolutely believable - completely altered the way I see the case. It's clearly the result not of a sensational theory but of many years of meticulous and intelligent research and deduction. It's lucidly written, it won't take months to plough through, but it's far from lightweight. There is a great deal of fascinating information in this book, provocative and allusive, and the author is commendably honest about the limits of his current research.

In all, one of less than a handful of Ripper books that I would call indispensable. If you think you already know a great deal about the world in which the murders took place, this may be one book that opens up a whole new world for you, and it is to be hoped that it is not the author's last word on the subject.

One caveat: the title suggests that bank holidays might be in some way highly significant or telling. This is one aspect that simply disappears from view about halfway through the book. But nevertheless, a superb work.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Reading this book it is very apparent to the reader that a lot of research has gone into it. Very well written and easy to read, the author takes us on a journey through the case, giving his perspective as he sees how the case unfolded. I particularly liked his research on Pearly Poll, who seemed, maybe coincidentally, to be oddly entwined into each of the murders in one way or another. Lots of factual background information that is interesting and some of it was certainly new to me.This book provokes food for thought and stretches one's imagination, and even if I felt at times that some things were pure conjecture on the author's part, nevertheless it was a refreshing change to look at the case from a different angle. I came away from it, I think, with a better understanding of the case, and of what was really going on in that autumn of 1888. This book is an essential requirement, in my opinion, in all serious enthusiast's collection, and I strongly recommend.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Refreshing new research and approach. The only problem I had with it is that the author points to the lack of blood stains at the alleged crime scene where Emma Smith was assaulted and yet makes the observation that it took the hospital two days to communicate with the police and the investigation to start. That's two days for a supposed crime scene to be tampered with. Considering how blood was washed away at the Nichols murder site, the possibility that a random blood spill in a part of town not renowned for its environmental hygiene awareness could have been overlooked if not washed away by one of the locals without an iota of inquisitiveness.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having debated and discussed the Ripper Case with Tom on Casebook forums, I was keen to get my hands on his book.

Once again Tom does not disappoint and shows why he is one of the top Ripperologists out there. Out the window with crazy theories of some other authors, Tom uses pure deduction, logic and reasoning to come to his conclusions.

This book made me stand back and see the Jack the Ripper case in an entirely new light and a new angel. In Ripperology this is a hard thing to do, with lots of misinformation and preconceptions that are already in place and burned into the public psyche when one thinks of Jack the Ripper.

Tom also reminds us all, that the characters and people of Whitechapel can be far more interesting, ruthless and hold a lot more secrets that the infamous murderer himself.

Highly recommended and a must read for any interest in Jack the Ripper and wants to study the case.
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