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Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism MP3 CD – Audiobook, 26 Dec 2007

4.3 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

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MP3 CD, Audiobook, 26 Dec 2007
£14.36 £36.01
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; MP3 Una edition (26 Dec. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781423346852
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423346852
  • ASIN: 1423346858
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.3 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,474,210 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"A smart, lively and provocative book that offers us compelling new ways to look at globalization" (Joseph E. Stiglitz, Nobel laureate in Economics, 2001)

"Every orthodoxy needs effective critics. Ha-Joon Chang is probably the world's most effective critic of globalization. He does not deny the benefits to developing countries of integration into the world economy. But he draws on the lessons of history to argue that they must be allowed to integrate on their own terms" (Martin Wolf, Financial Times, author of 'Why Globalization Works')

"This is a marvellous book. Well researched, panoramic in its scope and beautifully written, Bad Samaritans, is the perfect riposte to devotees of a one-size-fits-all model of growth and globalization. I strongly urge you to read it" (Larry Elliott, Economics Editor, Guardian)

"In this more polemical tract, [Chang] adds the spark of personal reflection ... and some mischievous rhetorical set-pieces." (The Economist)

"This is an excellent book...deploys the logical discipline of economics and its engagement with quantitative evidence, but does so in jargon-free prose that sparkles with anecdotes and practical observations." (International Affairs) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

A radical look by a leading economist at the issues surrounding the future of globalization. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ha-Joon Chang shares the views of Paul Mason and Yanis Varoufakis on the complicity of rich nations to ensure that the world's wealth trickles up to them; and that, within them, wealth trickles up to the richest individuals. Recommended.
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Format: Paperback
I bought this book by chance and have to say that I was completely surprised by it's content. I was born and raised in a third world country in South America, then did a PhD in Europe and worked a little bit so I have a view on both worlds and find the content of this book very accurate, according to my own experience. What this book tells is the story of how third world countries had to struggle to survive using the rules imposed by rich countries. Many people is convinced that we always have to do as they said but recently, after years of using that formula, some countries started listening to new ideas and tried (and are still trying) to brake the vicious circle they are into.
This books explains in easy terms why is that those formulas were not working and why they are appealing to the rich countries. Thus why they impose them on the poor countries.
For people living in rich countries this book can show them the cost of their high standards of living and once they know they will be able to try to change things. This books also shows how the rich countries can grow while the poor countries also do it. So it is not an apolitical view, on the contrary, I see it as a message of hope. The more we know the more we can change.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There are so many books on poverty out there, they all seem to blur into one....Not Bad Samaritans. This book stands out as far and away the best I've ever read (and I've done post-graduate study in International Development so I've read a lot!). If you are looking for a factually balanced, well written book which is accessible to everyone, pick this!

Dr. Chang is a Professor from Cambridge University, UK and it shows. His views are a product of years of detailed reserach - everything he says is backed up with accurate and balanced data.

I recommend this book to everyone!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have recently become a fan of Prof Chang after reading "23 Things etc" so I immediately downloaded "Bad Samaritans" to find, on the Kindle version the Contents section and Prologue were missing.This didn't bother me too much but I then found that the references within the chapters were not linked to the comments at the rear of the book. The last straw was that the index at the back of the book does not refer back to the entry in the main body of the book. I have cancelled the Kindle version and bought the paperback.
I reported this to Amazon who just referred me to the publisher.( I gave up trying to track them down )
My feelings are that Amazon should take a more active interest in the digital formatting of these eBooks.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While I have a lot of sympathy for the argument Ha-Joon Chang is trying to make, one cannot get away from the fact that he's making it terribly. The argument itself might not be wrong, but the justifications given for it vary from appeal to authority (while the book equally dishes traditional sources of authority, without justifying why we should trust one set of experts but not the other) to emotional claims to moral outrage to reasoning that simply skips steps. Perhaps this is the result of an effort to make the book more appealing to a wider audience. The result, however, is a book that I would give to my undergraduate students only to make them understand how not to back their claims.
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Format: Hardcover
Bad Samaritans is a more personal and more polemical book than Ha-Joon Chang's earlier Kicking Away the Ladder, but it is still very restrained compared to most "anti-globalisation" books, and far more effective. Chang is not properly opposed to trade and markets as such, but merely argues that the current economic policies supported by the IMF and wealthy countries are hindering development and creating poverty. He bases this view not only on his very rigorous research into comparative development over his years as an economics professor, but also on his direct experience of his native South Korea's development.

Chang's brilliant riposte to Thomas L. Friedman, in the chapter "The Lexus and the Olive Tree Revisited" is worth more than the very modest cost of the book on its own. While the economics is spot-on, and very well informed, the style is easy to read, and just right for the general reader.
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Format: Paperback
Bad Samaritans is a more personal and more polemical book than Ha-Joon Chang's earlier Kicking Away the Ladder, but it is still very restrained compared to most "anti-globalisation" books, and far more effective. Chang is not properly opposed to trade and markets as such, but merely argues that the current economic policies supported by the IMF and wealthy countries are hindering development and creating poverty. He bases this view not only on his very rigorous research into comparative development over his years as an economics professor, but also on his direct experience of his native South Korea's development.

Chang's brilliant riposte to Thomas L. Friedman, in the chapter "The Lexus and the Olive Tree Revisited" is worth more than the very modest cost of the book on its own. While the economics is spot-on, and very well informed, the style is easy to read, and just right for the general reader.
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