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Back from the Brink: 1000 Days at Number 11 by [Darling, Alistair]
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Back from the Brink: 1000 Days at Number 11 Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 132 customer reviews

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Length: 353 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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...one heck of a good read. --Guardian

...a balanced, thoughtful , sober account of arguably the greatest crisis of the 21st Century... --Mail on Sunday

[Alistair Darling] writes compellingly about the market meltdown and ensuing recession, spicing the narrative with a droll wit and acidic observations about the arrogant and stupid bank chiefs. If this story has been told before, it is still informative to have the scary view from the edge of the precipice as Britain teeters on the brink of a complete collapse of its banks. --Observer

About the Author

Alistair Darling is the Member of Parliament for Edinburgh South West. Initially appointed as Chief Secretary to the Treasury in 1997, he moved to become Secretary of State for Work and Pensions in 1998. He spent another four years as Secretary of State for Transport, also becoming Secretary of State for Scotland in 2003. He served as Secretary of State for Trade and Industry in 2006, before Gordon Brown promoted him to Chancellor in 2007.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2479 KB
  • Print Length: 353 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books; Main edition (7 Sept. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005JZD3YQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 132 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #125,478 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Were you to have asked me, prior to reading this book, who was my favourite political biography, I would have replied, Chris Mullin. The reason for that choice was based upon the fact that here was a man who could laugh at himself, as well as others. Mullin has no pomposity and the same can be said of Alistair Darling. The advantage which Darling holds over Mullin is that he held a senior government position (Chancellor of the Exchequer) during a significant historical era (the financial crash of 2008).

It is refreshing to read a political biography in which the main character was not the only person who realised, the exact situation, from day one, and how it should be handled. Alistair Darling is generous with his praise and quick to acknowledge the input of his colleagues, even when they are not bosom buddies.

Reading this book made me realise just how serious the banking crisis had been. One of the great problems with life today, when news is to hand twenty-four hours a day, is that a news programme needs sensation. Everything becomes the most serious crisis that man has ever faced and, naturally, the listener becomes blasé. Darling's book is written in a much more modest style and so, when he paints a picture of near collapse, it is so much more chilling. The section dealing with the banks is more gripping than any financial thriller that one may have read. Darling is honest enough to admit that nobody, himself included, really knew how to deal with events and leads us through the path that he, and Gordon Brown, took to reaching an effective course of action.

Darling is also of great interest when dealing with the Labour Party leadership. He served at close quarters with both Tony Blair and Gordon Brown.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a view of the financial meltdown from a man right at the very heart of it. There are good books that pull together facts from interviews and other sources (I recommend Too Big to Fail: Inside the Battle to Save Wall Street thoroughly), but this view from someone on the inside was what compelled me to read.

Much has been in the media of the relationship with Gordon Brown, and the criticisms Darling has for his boss, but the book contains much more than that. Darling is both frustrated and filled with contempt when the bankers can't quite grasp the situation they are in and the lengths the Government have to go try and clean up their mess. He is lucid about the stress of the situation that he is put under, from the lack of sleep to the strains of dealing with the media and his own people. And yes, he is candid about Gordon Brown's leadership - particularly about the strain of the "election that never was".

Don't get me wrong - I don't particularly like the way this has come out. Couldn't he have said something at the time? Done something different? Had more backbone? I don't know. Suffice to repeat my old Grandad's phrase - "you make your bed, you lie in it". Despite that, I found it to be a good read - I'm not usually into books from politicians but the writing style is good and it flows well.
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Format: Hardcover
Really enjoyed this book. A few days of holiday reading and it kept me gripped thru til the end, what it did tell me was that Darling was a grafter, he glued the Labour financial programme together in the last few years of the administration and importantly, helped the UK thru some very trying times. A lot of respect for this man, who comes across as a genuine and honourable man.

Well recommended if you want to learn more about economics and politics...
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Format: Hardcover
It was obvious at the time and now we have the copious personal reflections of former Chancellor Alastair Darling in his very readable memoir "Back from the Brink: 1,000 Days at Number 11" confirming that Gordon Brown supported him in the same way that a rope supports a hanging man. Darling was a mainstay of all the new Labour cabinets from 1997 and yet would never be viewed by the Stalinist apparatchiks around Brown such as Ed Balls, Charlie Whelan and Damien McBride as "on message". Indeed the brooding Prime Minister wanted Balls to have his job despite the fact that in the wider Labour Party, Browns protege was about as popular as a rat sandwich. As it stands the resignation of James Purnell and the "Coup that never happened" during the summer of 2009 against Brown effectively saved Darlings place in Number 11 and led the Prime Minister in a typically grudging lack of enthusiasm to tell Darling "Ok you can stay".

Quite why Darling wanted to stay is a mystery. The constant interference by Balls and Brown was one thing but the great economic forces were signalling the darkest clouds as the world economy collapsed around Lehman Bothers and on Darling's "watch". The British Economy was hit by a succession of crisis starting with Northern Rock in 2007, the bailouts of irresponsible bankers, a deep recession and yet four years later still seems more fragile than ever. We learn that Darling was key in ensuring that the Barclays bail out of Lehman's didn't happen not least with the fears that even more bad debt contagion be brought into our system. We also learn Darling intense frustrations with the Governor of the Bank of England Mervyn King who he describes as `amazingly stubborn and exasperating".
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