Bach: Cello Suites. Rostr... has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by encorerecords
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Dispatched in 2-3 Working days from the UK (encorerecords IIcl) Box Set
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Bach: Cello Suites. Rostropovich [Boxed set] Double CD

4.7 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

Price: £35.83 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
3 new from £18.00 15 used from £2.50 2 collectible from £21.99
£35.83 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Product details

  • Performer: Mstislav Rostropovich
  • Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach
  • Audio CD (1 May 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Double CD
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B000002RUY
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 85,763 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Prélude
  2. Allemande
  3. Courante
  4. Sarabande
  5. Menuett I
  6. Menuett II
  7. Gigue
  8. Prélude
  9. Allemande
  10. Courante
  11. Sarabande
  12. Bourrée I
  13. Bourrée II
  14. Gigue
  15. Prélude
  16. Allemande
  17. Courante
  18. Sarabande
  19. Gavotte I
  20. Gavotte II
  21. Gigue

Disc: 2

  1. Prélude
  2. Allemande
  3. Courante
  4. Sarabande
  5. Menuett I
  6. Menuett II
  7. Gigue
  8. Prélude
  9. Allemande
  10. Courante
  11. Sarbande
  12. Bourrée I
  13. Bourrée II
  14. Gigue
  15. Prélude
  16. Allemande
  17. Courante
  18. Sarabande
  19. Gavotte I
  20. Gavotte II
  21. Gigue

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
The greatest 'cellist ever playing music by quite possibly the greatest composer ever. Hardly surprising this is recommended by every single guide to classical music recordings I've ever seen - indeed, it's such a performance that it should be a yardstick for such books; if it doesn't recommend this, the guide's been put together by monkeys. This is genius, one of the artistic high points of Western civilisation. My words cannot do it justice.
Rostropovich refused to make a recording of these pieces until he felt he had enough musical experience and ability to do J.S. Bach's music justice. This CD was made when he was about seventy. Compare this to the much younger Yo-Yo Ma's recordings and you can hear the benefit of such respect for the composer. The depth of emotion Rostropovich puts into his playing is like nothing I've ever heard before, and of course his tone is flawlessly beautiful. I cannot say anything specific about the individual suites, as there are no criticisms to make, and the standard is so uniformly high that no one moment is more perfect than another. Listening to this CD will remind you exactly why people listen to music.
Comment 51 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
When this set was released in the mid 90s my cellist friend who was -and still is- a great Slava devotee of course didn't doubt one second before he went to buy it, since it's simply the greatest music played by the greatest cellist. When I asked my friend after a week or so how it was, he frowned bitterly and said "Avoid it for Heaven's sake! Try Heinrich Schiff instead."

As it happened I just heard the Rostropovich set today for the first time, aware of the strong, unanimous ovations from Amazon's customers. After hearing a few bars my friend's reaction sprang to my mind -he was right. I heard a great musician in serious decline. Ok there is 'wisdom' and 'authority'. But I sense a painful lack of cantabile, dance and flow. And what about purity of tone and intonation? I couldn't believe my ears; try the Prelude from the 4th Suite for a sample. Scandalous!

I'd love to be able to overlook these shortcomings as being merely technical and superficial, but I can't. The music doesn't have some kind of varnish under which the 'essence' or 'heart' lies. The music IS its surface or, the surface, the technique and their beauty are inseparable parts of the music itself.

For Bach's Cello Suites I would recommend Janos Starker on Mercury. Among Rostropovich's recordings I would recommend Schubert: Arpeggione Sonata, Concertos by Shostakovich (don't miss Nr. 2!) and of course Dvorak and finally Prokofiev's Symphony-Concerto (Sinfonia Concertante).

I know only one bad record by Miles Davis and it's Doo-Bop (one of his last if not the very last), one bad by Jascha Heifetz, namely Schubert's Fantasy and here we have Maestro Rostropovich's contribution to that category -based on what I've heard which indeed is from a limited not to say narrow horizon (at least in the case of Rostropovich).

If only he would have recorded the Suites some 15 years earlier!
5 Comments 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
It is difficult to know what to add to the many useful and intelligent reviews already posted on Amazon, but anyone who owns this recording feels the compulsion to share his enthusiasm with other music lovers. While other cellists - particularly Casals and Fournier - have made indispensable records of their interpretation of these sublime suites, this one comes as close as possible to offering everything you would require in a performance: full, deep recorded sound with the slight resonance and aura around it which the Burgundian gothic basilica of Vézelay provided (Slava chose this venue particularly for its rich acoustic); flawless playing by perhaps the greatest cellist ever; wonderfully illuminating notes which both enhance your understanding of the music and also of how Rostropovich finally felt ready to record his interpretation; in short, the finest possible account of these transcendent, spiritually profound masterworks. Obviously, you must respond to Rostropovich's more Romantic, unbuttoned interpretative stance, not mind some expressive slurs and not constantly be on the lookout for minor slips in intonation. If you desire a more restrained, inward, "classical" approach, go to Fournier, but anyone who seeks repose, truth and beauty in this troubled world needs to own this set; it will repay you with inexhaustible listening pleasure.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Your atoms are a loan from the universe. Sooner or later, it’ll want them back. Rupert Murdoch says that you’re an unnecessary being. The person who taught you how to read is mulch. Years ago, someone whispered your true name but you failed to hear it. Restoration – renewal – resurrection: these words are mendacious; lie they do. Heat-death will kill you long before your final day.

So here it is, against all odds, unwarranted and ill-deserved - an opportunity to fan that flame within you which transcends the dust of the Periodic Table. How that flame burns as Johann Sebastian Bach and Mstislav Rostropovich, once beggars, quieten the City of Mahagonny to address the Real. To think that Mozart never heard this music and the Devil informed him of its existence in his last moments.

Submit yourself to this experience. Bid farewell to constructs and shadows. Be transfigured as the catenation of numbers comes to an end as they taper away into totality.
6 Comments 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback