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Baader Meinhof Complex [Blu-ray]

4.2 out of 5 stars 110 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated
  • Run Time: 149.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (110 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002LFPA5M
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 261,147 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)
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Product description

Product description

Germany in the 1970s: Murderous bomb attacks, the threat of terrorism and the fear of the enemy inside are rocking the very foundations of the still fragile German democracy. The radicalized children of the Nazi generation led by Andreas Baader (Moritz Bleibtreu), Ulrike Meinhof (Martina Gedeck) and Gudrun Ensslin (Johanna Wokalek) are fighting a violent war against what they perceive as the new face of fascism: American imperialism supported by the German establishment, many of whom have a Nazi past.Their aim is to create a more human society but by employing inhuman means they not only spread terror and bloodshed, they also lose their own humanity. The man who understands them is also their hunter: the head of the German police force, Horst Herold (Bruno Ganz). And while he succeeds in his relentless pursuit of the young terrorists, he knows he's only dealing with the tip of the iceberg.

Synopsis

Germany in the 1970s: Murderous bomb attacks, the threat of terrorism and the fear of the enemy inside are rocking the very foundations of the still fragile German democracy. The radicalized children of the Nazi generation lead by Andreas Baader (Moritz Bleibtreu), and Ulrike Meinhof (Martina Gedeck) and Gudrun Ensslin (Johanna Wokalek) are fighting a violent war against what they perceive as the new face of fascism: American imperialism supported by the German establishment. Their aim is to create a more human society but by employing inhuman means they not only spread terror and bloodshed, they also lose their own humanity. --This text refers to the DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is an excellent film that presents a dramatization of historical events in Germany during the 1960's and 1970's. The story concerns the formation and activities of a radical and militant left-wing group - the Red Army Faction (RAF) - that operated illegally in West Germany, organised along Leninist lines, and sought to destabilise capitalism in that country. The film explores the early aims and objectives of certain key individuals - Andreas Baader, Ulrike Meinhof and Gudrun Ensslin - showing how, initially, they sought to redress perceived civil wrongs within society. Yet, as their organisation developed, the group escalated into terrorism - carrying out bombings, kidnappings and assassinations. Ultimately the German police capture these individuals, and the movie depicts the lengthy court proceedings and their imprisonment.

The film is superbly acted, with standout performances by Moritz Bleibtreu, Martina Gedeck, Johanna Wokalek and Bruno Ganz. It is, in the end, a tale that explores disillusionment with the status quo and how efforts to fight for greater freedom and liberty can become twisted into terror and murder. This is a violent film, yet it makes for compelling viewing - especially knowing that it's based on actual events.

This movie is in German, with English subtitles. If you enjoy it, I also recommend The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006].
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By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 2 April 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A film highlighting a Greek tragedy. Beginning shots of the violence directed at the Shah' s visit escalating into a riot. A slow car crash of events born from the disasterous foreign policy mistakes of the victorious allies containing communism.

The post 45 children raised in austerity and penance finally burst into 60's affluence with the ever present fear of the Nazi return. The beginning of the film shows the unthinking state attacking its own students, to keep the Shah Reza Pahlei of Persia on his wobbling throne. He replaced the democratically elected Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh who wanted to nationalise the oil industry in 1953. The Brits under Churchill and the Americans led by Eisenhower organised the coup and his removal. Democracy was snuffed out in the middle east until the invasion of Iraq "restored" it again.

Machinations of the USA war machine in Vietnam, manufacturing the Tomkin Bay incident to instigate a rationale for a war with a backward 3rd world country. This led to the pouring of American resources into Indo China to stop dominoes from tumbling down.

All to keep the world safe, biological weapons (Rats innoculated with rabies) and chemical weapons (Napalm, Agent Orange) were poured into holes and jungles to make the country safer for democracy. Trouble is the Vietnamese already had their national elections cancelled by the Americans fearing a northern victory and reunion. The southern leaders were appointees, whose tenures were variously ended ended by CIA "advisers" and then again in a coup.

The displaced Palestinians were ringed into their reservations whilst the iron grip on their lives forced them into further poverty and fury of revenge attacks.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
There is a lot of violent content in this film, but it is important contribution to understanding how people can become part of terror movements. Not an easy film to watch, but important in today's climate.
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Brilliant!!!!!
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Astonishing chronicle of the agony of Germany in the 1960s. Brilliant.
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good
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By Diz on 21 April 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In some ways, this film reminded me of Paul Verhoeven's films in that it will probably upset people with both right and left wing views, and it is very violent.

As for the violence, the Baader-Meinhof 'gang' was extremely violent so there is some justification. It is an '18' rated film - 'Contains very strong language and strong bloody violence'. And there is plenty of both. Loads of blood - some in slow motion.

Well, is it any good? Yes, it is. It's nearly two and half hours long, but it's pretty riveting throughout. The opening scenes give you a very quick and graphic metaphor for the origins of the RAF (Red Army Faction). A demonstration by opponents of the Shah of Iran is split up by Iranian supporters of the Shah, supported by the police. Horrified protestors scatter and a student is shot dead. The German establishment is seen to be hand-in-glove with repressive regimes. Student demonstrations follow with the attempted murder of Rudi Dutschke, and the RAF is born.

After this shocking start, your sympathies are inevitably with the nascent RAF as, it appears, a large proportion of German youth was, too. This is the generation of the baby-boomers (including Uli Edel, the director, born 1947), coming up against the generation that lived through the Second World War. Dope smoking nudists, squats and communes and all the other hippy paraphernalia mixed with automatic weapons develops into a dangerous band of bank robbers with Arab terrorist links - an uneasy alliance as Andreas Baader complains that crawling through deserts is not great training for raiding banks and kidnapping industrialists, and young Arab recruits ogle Gudrun Ensslin and friends nude sun bathing on the roof of their barracks.

We know the history, we know what happens.
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