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Axiomatic Mass Market Paperback – 6 Jul 1998

4.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Mass Market Paperback, 6 Jul 1998
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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz; New edition edition (6 July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0752816500
  • ISBN-13: 978-0752816500
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 2.5 x 17.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,886,426 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Australian writer Greg Egan presents 18 of his short stories from the early 1990s in this collection. The blurb on the cover says "Science fiction for people who like science fiction," and experienced and new sci-fi fans alike will agree. The ideas and world-building are light years ahead of the pack.

Highlights include: "The Hundred Light-Year Diary", in which society deals with the mixed blessing of diaries sent back in time to earlier selves; "Eugene", in which a working-class couple decide if, and then to what degree, they should genetically enhance their baby; "The Caress", a science fiction detective story that will leave you feeling disturbed; "The Safe-Deposit Box", in which the narrator seeks to know why he has spent his life waking up every day in a new body; "A Kidnapping", which throws a new light on avatar crime; "Learning To Be Me", a story that recalls some of the Mind's I essays; "Appropriate Love", in which insurance companies pressure a couple in need of medical care; "The Moral Virologist", a tale of a deranged geneticist attempting to redeem the world through a computer virus; and "Closer", about a happy couple who enjoy using the latest technological gadgetry to learn more about each other ... although sometimes they learn too much.

About the Author

Greg Egan lives in Perth, Western Australia. He has won the John W. Campbell award for Best Novel and has been short listed for the Hugo three times.


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A witty, thoughtful and well-crafted collection of short stories, combining convincing characterisation with fascinating, well grounded and often chilling speculation on the human effects of scientific advance,
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Format: Paperback
Firstly; watch out for plot spoiler reviews!!
(it's not a mystery tour if you know where your heading)

Egan's work is 'Hard' Sci-Fi of the highest order. I give him the edge over Brian Aldis (my other favorite), as concepts are heavier and plots driven by 'rawer' science at a blistering pace.

His breadth of vision astounds; always extrapolating logically to the n'th degree. A modicum of effort may be required from the reader at times; but one is richly rewarded with a sense of awe, discovery and achievement. Each book is a Grand Odyssey.

Hold tight and don't look down, because he'll take you a long, long way from where you started....
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Axiomatic a collection of short stories, each one a masterpiece. When I finished it all I could think was - I must read more Greg Egan. Not only does he have a powerful imagination, but he also knows how to put his ideas into writing.
Stop wasting your time buy it now !
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm being generous here because I found the first three of the stories such a struggle that I gave up. If I were rating this book on what I had read I would give it one star, but I'll assume the other stories are better and give it two. The problem? The author seems much too keen on the Science, and insufficiently keen on the Fiction. It's like reading a popular science book with the detail randomly interspersed with a story. If you are familiar with the science the scanty story will not hold your attention. If you are not familiar with the science you won't learn anything and the scanty story still won't hold your attention. Here's a line from the first page: "The number of parallel worlds is uncountably infinite". It might have been OK if he had stopped at "infinite" (and had included an interesting story), but "uncountably infinite"? Later in the "story" he explains that "uncountably" refers to an infinity like the Real numbers, as opposed to a countable infinity like the Ordinals. If you know what he's talking about you'll know that a) the explanation is unhelpful without more information and b) adds nothing to the story. If you don't know what he's talking about you won't have learned much, if anything. If I wanted a lecture I would have bought a different book. I wanted fiction, but this was just showing off.
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