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The Auxiliaries - Tudor's Toughs, A study of the Auxiliary Division Royal Irish Constabulary 1920-1922 by [McCall, Ernest]
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The Auxiliaries - Tudor's Toughs, A study of the Auxiliary Division Royal Irish Constabulary 1920-1922 Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 6739 KB
  • Publisher: Red Coat Publishing; 1 edition (10 Nov. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005966SC4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #434,556 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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I REALLY enjoyed this book, both sides of the issue is given and the confusion over what a Black and Tan is and the Auxiliaries are is well explained. Dispels the myths concerning this unit. A really great read.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Ernest McCall makes no secret of his admiration for the Auxiliary Division of the Royal Irish Constabulary. One part of the group of police recruited from the UK that became known as the Black and Tans the Auxiliary Division was on active service for less than a year and then continued for a further six months until the Truce was superceded by a Treaty creating the Irish Free State. The active strength seems to have been around 1,500 men grouped in companies of about 100 spread around in the country's worst trouble spots.In that short time the Auxiliaries acquired a fearsome reputation that has survived to this day.

The usual description is of an ill disciplined force, under little official control and prone to outbreaks of savage violence in which heavy drinking is often mentioned.The Author does his best to redress the balance and makes a case that in fact this was an elite and generally brave group of ex officers who became a formidable and feared fighting force that did much to blunt the IRA's capacity to fight.

This book has many positives. The pictures are excellent and from them you can get a good impression of what these men were like. The Author has thoroughly researched the subject and provided a lot of new and valuable information.That said the book has its flaws too. There is a fair degree of repetition and the author lets himself get diverted down a few unconnected cul de sacs. The background analysis is simplistic and the case in favour overstated. The most notorious episodes of murder and thuggery get a mention but are then rather glided over as regrettable but unrepresentative.
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Format: Kindle Edition
At last. Ninety years after they were disbanded, one of the most controversial experiments in internal security has the spotlight shone on it. Ernest McCall's new book on the Auxiliary Division RIC (ADRIC) is fact-packed, well-illustrated and researched and is the latest work in a series from historians inside and outside Ireland that examine different facets of the Irish revolutionary period. Writing about that period almost guarantees that you will not please everyone and in dedicating the book to those ADRIC killed in the War of Independence, McCall nails his colours to the mast.

The experiment was whether a force that was neither police nor military but somewhere in between, recruited quickly and in many cases with little local knowledge of the conflict, could actually have an impact. Most historians would probably agree that they did make an impact, however the disagreement starts here. To Republicans, the Auxiliaries were brutal mercenaries who made a bad situation worse. To the British, they were exactly what the campaign needed and suppressed violence quickly. I think it is possible that both of these positions can be true simultaneously. The campaign in many areas had degenerated into tit-for-tat killings and attacks, so further offensive action by the Crown Forces would be met by reprisals, which led to counter-reprisals. In that sense, it could be argued that they just perpetuated the violence. And they were brutal, as McCall describes in terms of their disciplinary record which left a lot to be desired. A D Harvey has already shown that charges that the ADRIC were basically criminals were wrong.
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