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Atlantis Paperback – 18 Jul 2005

2.5 out of 5 stars 96 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Headline Book Publishing, London; Reprint edition (18 July 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780755324224
  • ISBN-13: 978-0755324224
  • ASIN: 0755324226
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 17.5 x 3.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (96 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 635,072 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

" The historical conspiracy angle gives the book "Da Vinci"-esque appeal, and the intense visual details of the team's marine discoveries make it naturally cinematic." -- "Publishers Weekly"

"The historical conspiracy angle gives the book "Da Vinci"-esque appeal, and the intense visual details of the team's marine discoveries make it naturally cinematic." "Publishers Weekly"" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

History's greatest code has finally been broken ...

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Here we have a classic case of an author wanting to jump on the pseudo-science and pseudo-history bandwagon that started with Michael Crichton and has been accelerated by Dan Brown.
Author David Gibbins is ostensibly an expert in the field of underwater archeology. It shows, too. If you can last the book out, the historical hypothesis seems to be very well researched and presented. Like the hijacked "Bloodline" theory in DaVinci Code, Gibbins has taken a scientific theory and presented it in a fictional context by dressing a story around it.
Sadly, this is no way to write a novel - especially if your writing talents are as obviously unrefined as those on display in "Atlantis". The characterisation is awful, the book is very badly paced - jumping from high tension to relaxed academic argument from page to page. Worst of all are the action sequences and the relationships between the characters. In the latter case, the players appear like the cast of a very poor James Bond copy (the locations are no better)it is eyeball-gougingly awful to have to read the sections concerning the female lead. The chief protagonist too, is straight from a b-rated 1960s spy thriller.
The nail in the coffin has to be the action. Whilst I have no doubt that Gibbins is an expert in his academic field, he clearly knows nothing about military matters, and has not bothered to research them properly. Some of the action sequences go beyond the point of ridiculous and enter the realm of the absurd. Particular gems include firing a sniper rifle from the cockpit of a moving helicopter (by the pilot, no less!)and goons that react to the sound of a dead goon's rifle being dropped, but not to the gunfire that killed him.
I give this 2 stars rather than the 1 star it is begging for, only because as a concept, Atlantis is not bad. The storytelling and characterisation are nothing short of laughable. Don't buy.
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By A Customer on 17 Oct. 2005
Format: Paperback
I fell for this in the airport. Love diving, love Atlantis. What could possibly go wrong? Everything. It seems as if the book was never edited. The plot is inconsistant and unbelievable, the characters never come to life and/or are completely based on clichés. The guy had a one great idea, but he did not have what it takes to follow it through and cheap as this book was, it was a complete waste of money.
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Format: Paperback
Very clever book, a little too over the top on the technical jargon, and i found the book very difficult to read. If you persist with it, it's worth the challenge.

I've been reading some of the previous reviews, and what are you on about, THIS BOOK IS FICTION, NOT FACT, it tells you on the book, so why are you going on about Atlntis doesn't exist and that you were reading it to find out the facts. Well duh, your dissappointed, it's not factual, it tells you it's not factual. There are some factual references, but THATS IT.

I found one of the reviewers rather racist too, classing whites as believing we're more superior. That's very rude, and insulting.

Overall this book is worth the read if you wish to mix a little fact with fiction. If you really enjoy the techinical side to excavations and archiological digs etc. this is the book for you. It certainly opened my eyes in regards to how much technical information you must have for such a job.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I opened this book with great anticipation of an informative and exciting read. Informative? yes, exciting? not really.
The archaeological points are factual and interesting, based on ancient books and the obviously great knowledge of the author.
Descriptions of the Black Sea Flood, Minoan Crete and the birth of civilization are fascinating.
The story starts with the discovery of a golden disc which eventually opens the doors to Atlantis.
However, on the way we encounter a warlord from Kazakhstan intent on stealing ancient artefacts from all around the world. This, in my opinion, is where the book breaks down. Aslan ( the warlord ) is really to all intents and purposes Dr. Evil from the Austin Powers movies. He has an 'underground lair' in a volcano complete with electric wheelchair and shuttles. He rants and raves and even has a female side kick.
Throw in a nuclear submarine still laden and ready to blow, and so much technical information that you want to scream and the story, in my opinion is ruined.
The characters are leaden and not sympathetic. They are all multi -task specialists in absolutely everything from deep sea diving to arms knowledge to helicopter flying even when seriously wounded. The main character escapes certain death with monotonous regularity dispensing with the baddies on the way!
When they finally reach their destination it all seems too fabulous to be even vaguely true, but there again I am no expert.
I found myself plodding wearily to the end rather like the character wading through the deadly luminous clouds of silt in the Black Sea.
Do read this book if you can handle the technical data, but if you are looking for history and adventure you would be better off Pompeii by Richard Harris.
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Format: Hardcover
I bought this book thinking it would be similar in reading to Dan Brown style books. It is similar.
On the downside, my mind has drifted on many occasions due to the author putting far to much description on the technology used by the characters, than into the characters themselves. I'm not interested in reading an entire page about mini submersible subs and how various attachments can be used and what purpose they provide, with a final line telling me which attachment is being used.
If there is anything that is found in the story or the author feels needs explaining, rest assured, one of the characters is gauranteed to know everything about that subject/item, and they then go on to explain it in every detail. Cheers for that info.
In all honesty, a story that could have had an awful lot of potential, and to those of you who want to know an awful lot about artefacts and the finding of artefacts this is the book to read. Unfortunately from my point of view the trivia is boring, but i am determined to finish the book as on the whole the story is so far good. I just keep falling asleep mid chapter, which brings me on to one final point, the chapter structure appears to be almost random, and each chapter feels very long (possibly due to the boring trivia).
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