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Asterix The Gaul by [Goscinny, Rene, Albert Uderzo]
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Asterix The Gaul Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 49 customer reviews

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Review

As for the English adaptations of Asterix, they represent a real triumph of the translator's art. Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge have finessed every allusion and tweaked every joke, so that their cascading English verbal wit seems to come straight from the heart of the original books (Boyd Tonkin THE INDEPENDENT)

A cartoon drawn with such supreme artistry, and a text layered with such glorious wordplay, satire and historical and political allusion that no reader should ever feel like they've outgrown it...It is absurd that these wonderful books were ever out of print, and it's great to have them back (Andrew Mueller TIME OUT)

If you're new to the indomitable Gauls, our favourite is Asterix in Britain, for its wry wit lampooning the Brits (IRELAND ON SUNDAY)

There are plenty of Latin quips and snippets of Roman history, but enough low puns to make the stories as enjoyable as ever (EVENING STANDARD)

Book Description

The first album chronicling the much-loved adventures of Asterix and friends.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 68610 KB
  • Print Length: 52 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0828849501
  • Publisher: Orion Children's Books; New Ed edition (2 Jan. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00H3LWWHI
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 49 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #141,069 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The appeal of the Asterix books is universal, and timeless. For children there are terrific stories well told, and dazzling illustrations. For adults - the real audience - there are René Goscinny's wonderful jokes and marvellous puns, interspersed with quotations from classical authors, The Bible, Napoleon, Shakespeare and many many more. And Albert Uderzo's illustrations are often simply breathtaking. So, many of the visual ideas in "Asterix and Cleopatra" come from the film "Cleopatra" with Elizabeth Taylor and Rex Harrison. Meanwhile, in "Asterix the Legionary" the pirates' ship is sunk by Asterix and Obelix (again). The image of the pirates on a raft in mid ocean is taken from a 19th Century French Romantic painting in the Louvre, "The Raft of the Medusa", by Géricault. In the French version the pirate captain says to the reader "Je suis médusé" ("I'm gobsmacked"). In English this is rendered equally cleverly as "We've been framed, by Jericho".
Ah, the translations. Asterix owes his success in the English-speaking world to the brilliance of the translators, Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. They've been responsible for all the Asterix books since "Asterix the Gaul" first appeared in English in 1969, an amazing record. So true is their work to the spirit of the French originals, that it's as though Goscinny and Uderzo had produced the books in English in the first place. Some of the jokes are arguably better in English than in French, especially the names. Having two legionaries called Sendervictorius and Appianglorius, in "Asterix the Gladiator", gives three jokes for the price of two. (Asterix trivia: Anthea Bell is the sister of Martin Bell, the former BBC war correspondent.
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By A Customer on 4 Nov. 2005
Format: Hardcover
I'm a big fan of the series, 'Cleopatra' and 'in Britain' being perhaps the two best of all. It's interesting to see the visual appearance of the characters change through the first half of the book until they reach their final - and best - look.
I'm just writing this to point out that most reviews here seem overpraising. Though good, this is one of the worst of the series, with not much in the way of plot or the ingenuity that at least a few dozen others are full of. If you want to read one Asterix book to see what the fuss is about, it's best to start with another, then read this for completion later on.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having read every "Asterix" book then published when I was a child, I have just read this one out loud to my six-year-old son at bedtime. It is the first of the series. He wanted to clarify who the "goodies" (Gauls) and "baddies" (Romans) were several times - which I agree is a bit simplistic, especially for this story where Julius Caesar engages in a temporary truce at the end of the story - and it took him a little while to understand that this was like a television cartoon on paper, rather than a picture book or text book. Once he got that, he loved it.

Having not read it out loud before, I really got hit with the characters' names, especially examples such as the Romans Chrismus Bonus and Ginandtonicus. My son was delighted with the pictographs for Gaulish/Roman swear words, and the various descriptions of "Biff! Bang! Wallop!" He was quite taken with the Roman centurion jumping up and down on the spot having a tantrum like a toddler, which is shown with lots of multiple feet and vibrating lines. And he adored the potion that causes everyone's hair and beard to grow to ridiculous lengths very quickly. He was quite interested in when the Romans formed their shields into a phalanx, so Daddy got to give him a quick introduction to Roman military history as well.

There are a few jokes actually written in Latin, and I had to admit defeat with those. Education is not what it was since Asterix first appeared in the 1960s. It is now on my bucket list to learn Latin, so that I can fully comprehend these jokes if nothing else.

A great hit with my son, and I will get him more from the series.
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Format: Hardcover
This is the first of the adventures of the little Gaulish warrior, Asterix. Their little village is surrounded by four Roman camps which have not been able to conquer these indomitable Gauls because of the magic potion they drink that gives them super-human strength. The Romans send a spy to find out the secret of their strengh. When he brings back the report, the Romans ambush the village's druid Getafix (who makes the magic potion) and try to get him to make it for them. Asterix leaves the safety of the village to find his friend. He learns of Getafix's being captured by the Romans and arranges to get into their camp, where he surrenders. Enjoy how Asterix and Getafix pull the wool over the eyes of their captures. Enjoy the wonderful "torture" of being Roman captives. And finally, enjoy how they reveal a plot against their arch-enemy, Julius Caesar. It literally is a "hair raising" adventure. Enjoy!
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Format: Paperback
It's worth noting that in this updated edition, the artwork has been digitally recoloured, losing a lot of the charm of the original or earlier editions. The cover too has been redrawn and has much less appeal. I would recommend seeking out an earlier copy for the true Asterix experience!
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