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The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilised Workplace and Surviving One That Isn't Paperback – 2 Dec 2010

4.3 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Piatkus (2 Dec. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749954035
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749954031
  • Product Dimensions: 12.5 x 1.2 x 20 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 112,600 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Entertaining and important ... This book is a blow for humanity as well as management (OBSERVER)

This meticulously researched book . . . puts into plain language an undeniable fact: the modern workplace is beset with a**holes . . . Sure to generate discussion around watercoolers (PUBLISHERS WEEKLY)

The definitive guide to understanding, counteracting, and not becoming an a**hole. I am qualified to make this judgment because (a) I've been an a**hole a few times and (b) been a victim of a**holes more than a few times (Guy Kawasaki)

A wry and useful look at the patterns of bullying in the workplace (IRISH TIMES)

Book Description

THE NO ASSHOLE RULE will be a manifesto for the masses who feel oppressed by the jerks they work with, serve and struggle to lead.

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4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By tallmanbaby TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 5 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback
This is my second attempt at reviewing this book, I can only assume that Amazon automatically screened the first because I quoted the title. So for the sake of Amazon, I am now reviewing the "No Armholes Rule".

As you might expect from the title, this is not your typical academic study. Even within the relatively informal sphere of management studies it relies heavily on anecdote, with a confessional air at times reminiscent of Charles Handy or even Rabbi Lional Blue.

The book is all about working with "armholes", or bullying overbearing obnoxious people who make your life a misery.

Bob Sutton is a noted academic, but has a good internet profile on the basis of this title, I've certainly heard him speak in podcasts, he maintains a blog and additional anecdotes regularly pop up.

The book is quite short, you could probably read it in an afternoon, and it is more like a really good magazine article, than a popular piece of social science. It is also crying out for an update with some more of the anecdotes that have been submitted over the years.

Having said all that, the book is brim full juicy stories, is an easy entertaining read and is likely to make you a nicer more considerate person. Not bad for a few pounds.
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Format: Paperback
It is a combination of case-study, anecdote, psychology and sociology that builds on the idea of a workplace of mutual respect and extends it to the organisation, the boss, your colleagues, clients and yourself. There are plenty of funny and not-so-funny observations in this and it provides some insightful ways of surviving these toxic situations.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book introduces some very clear concepts: the Certified Armhole (as opposed to someone who's merely having a bad day) and the Total Cost of Armhole (the armhole may appear to be the highest achiever in the team but only because the rest of the team may be thoroughly demoralised and the armhole may cause other costs that make them not worth it).

It's an entertaining and easy read, and good for managers to see why armholes must be dealt with. But it falls down in that there is almost no guidance on how to deal with an armhole colleague. The book merely suggests biding your time, going with the flow, enjoying small victories over the armhole and wait for them to be sacked. 3 out of 4 of this is good advice but it feels disabling. Also, the book has no irony in pointing out that bullies gang up on the weak, but then suggest witnesses to armhole behaviour "group together". And there's a later section of the book glorifying some very successful armholes...

I'm surprised this is already the second edition of the book. I'd recommend this as a read, but I'd recommend more the third edition, yet to be written, that actually has some workable advice.
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Format: Paperback
I bought this book because part of me was getting a bit fed up with my career path. The constant routine and petty competitiveness was starting to get me down. This book is a cure to a problem I've never really had and puts my own annoyances into perspective.

Maybe it's just my vocation; I'm a software engineer for a company that makes equipment for scientific research but have also worked in both the private and public utility sectors. I've yet to meet an AH as described by Sutton. Yes, people are annoying, but not for the reasons as described in this book. The Sutton AH is not in anyway subtle in achieving their aims; they are big, mean, glaring, nasty, loud, humiliating, shout at you till you cry type AHs. Maybe if I was working in an accountancy or law firm I would meet more of these people. If that's the case then I'm happy where I am, even if my vocation is less prestigious.

Maybe it's Americans? Everywhere I've been in my life, not just the workplace there has been an implied no Sutton AH rule. I know that if I went into my workplace with an attitude as described in this book I wouldn't be there much longer. Thing is, noone had to read Sutton's book before enforcing this.

The biggest problem is his definition of an AH; they have to be as described above to qualify. However, in my opinion the AH character trait is associated much more with deviousness and manifests as manipulative, condescendent and arrogant behaviour. Most people know that they won't get away with acting like a Sutton AH.
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Format: Paperback
Sutton gets it just right in this highly entertaining and relevant book. We all know people like those described in the book. And coping with them - or better yet keeping them out of our work lives - is a problem worth solving. It's nice to see someone in academia who embraces the practical concerns of real-life managers. Sutton's blend of case studies and thoughtful analysis is like a tonic for the spirit of those of us who have endured the sphincterage of terrible colleagues. You might wish that Sutton had written this book a while ago. Do your children a favor and save a copy for them. They'll need it.
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Format: Paperback
I admit it. I am a huge Sutton fan. I really enjoyed Weird Ideas that Work, and I think he outdid himself with the No A**hole Rule. This entertaining quick-read packs a good punch with a great balance of case studies and theory on jerks in the workplace. It kept me on the edge of my seat as I was able to finish this one in one sitting. The content of this book is topical to anyone in the workforce. Sutton (to my knowledge) is the first to address the issues discussed head on with excellent examples and candid advice.

Bob writes a lot on this topic in his Blog (which is very entertaining). If you want to take an Bob Sutton's A**hole self examination, you've got to take a stroll over to Guy Kawasaki's Blog and take the test.

Enjoy!
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