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Asshole: How I Got Rich & Happy by Not Giving a S*** About You Paperback – 27 Mar 2008

4.0 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (27 Mar. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141031050
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141031057
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 694,734 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

Everything I know I owe to this man. What an asshole! (Gordon Gekko )

If I was alive today I'd definitely be following the rules of assholism. Buy this book! (Machiavelli )

About the Author

Martin Kihn was a nice guy. The kind of guy who gives up his seat on the tube for old ladies and pregnant women. The kind of nice guy who always finished last. Until one day, he decided to become a different kind of guy. The kind of guy who always wins, who gets the girl - and the money. The kind of guy who's an asshole.

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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Kindle version has been very poorly transcribed: lots and lots of typos and apostrophe, punctuation and capitalisation errors. Not acceptable for a purchased published book.
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Format: Paperback
If you like hurting people for fun, striking fear into their hearts and generally intimidating them off the planet, then this is a must read. It's so incredible that someone will have to make a film of this. Laugh out loud stuff, it certainly is and Martin Kihn's transformation is incredible, I can really see myself in his Mr. Nice guy persona. All I need to do now is to take a deep breath and put his teachings into practice. I really do love these books on how to succeed in life, especially with a humorous bent like this. A must for all of life's climbers and movers, highly recommended. Also check out Alan Bates' `The Post Box at the Crossroads', he's another hilarious nice guy trying to make good.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's a slender volume (242 pages of quite large print, which will take you maybe four hours to read), but it's jam-packed with belly laughs. Starting with the oldest story in the world - Marty is a "too nice" 40-year-old whose New York flat isn't really what he wants, and who has only a couple of people reporting to him. Somehow, he can't seem to get promotion. A ripped, deadpan, non-nonsense guy who looks and acts like an ex-Marine is eating his lunch (sometimes literally). Marty decides to take his fate in his own hands, and tackle this guy ("The Nemesis") head-on. His repeated attempts to become a genuine, hard-case a$$hole are unbelievably funny, and sometimes disturbingly touching. Essentially, he is trying to find the recipe for material success in modern-day New York, and it's harder than it looks. Eventually, having attained his first seemingly impossible goal, but with the rest of them further away than ever, he comes to realize that coming on like The Terminator is not a reasonable permanent lifestyle - but it is a handy addition to his repertoir.
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Format: Paperback
One of the funniest titles, and subtitles, in the world, and a hilarious laugh-out-loud book...which I have read...twice.

We find Kihn, initially, struggling to assert himself.

He says early on that, "About the only thing I'd done that seemed like a concrete Axxhole step was buy a new ringtone for my phone. Now whenever anyone called me there was Ice-T's voice saying: 'Pick up the phone, player! Big money on the line!'"

He relates later that this actually went off in an important meeting: "Someone said, 'Wow.'"

He seeks out training for his purpose of stamping his footprint upon the world.

His stories about Al, the therapist he hired to train him to be an Axxhole, are so laugh-out-loud funny that I tell them to my friends. For example, try buying a CD, walking out, then immediately walking back in without the receipt, going to the front of the line, and loudly demanding a refund.

There is a lot of humanity in here and eventually he seems to come round to the fact that being an Axxhole isn't all it's cranked up to be.

Nevertheless there is also a lot of real truth in this book. Especially if you want to get ahead in business - or even just get the job done - you shouldn't be too "nice", which we are told meant "foolish" in Middle English.

In an important insight, Kihn realises that a man who is too nice is, in fact, living life as a woman.

As his work colleague Emily says, "It's not like we want to get treated like sxxx. But we want a provider. They need to make things happen out there. If they're passive we're both going down."

Later Emily wants to get off work early so she can attend her boyfriend's birthday party.
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Format: Paperback
Martin's last book "House of Lies" provided me with a handy guide during my brief career with a wannabe major consultancy group, but perhaps you had to have been a consultant to really enjoy it. His latest book should have a much wider audience, appealing to anyone who suspects they might be just too "nice"

He tells me it sells very well in Germany - I suspect the Germans might not have realised it isn't meant as a serious self help guide.
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