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Assassin's Riddle: A Brother Athelstan Medieval Mystery 7 by [Doherty, Paul]
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Assassin's Riddle: A Brother Athelstan Medieval Mystery 7 Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Length: 290 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Book Description

A thrillingly entertaining Sorrowful Mystery featuring Brother Athelstan

About the Author

Paul Doherty was born in Middlesbrough. He studied History at Liverpool and Oxford Universities and obtained a doctorate for his thesis on Edward II and Queen Isabella. He is now headmaster of a school in north-east London and lives with his family in Essex.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 676 KB
  • Print Length: 290 pages
  • Publisher: Severn Select (1 July 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008AVGLU4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #28,011 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's no riddle as to whether the seventh--and possibly final--episode of Paul Harding's "The Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan" is an exciting read or not. It is! In "The Assassin's Riddle," Harding continues the escapades, adventures, and good deeds of Brother Athelstan, the Dominican friar of St. Erconwald's parish in Southwark in fourteenth century London. Harding forwards his usual cast of characters in this medieval mystery and, once again, we find them abroil in yet another set of mysteries. Someone is killing off the clerks at the Chancery of the Green Wax; someone has stolen a fortune in silver from the Crown, committing murder at the same time; there has appeared a holy mystery at the church: a crucifix that bleeds; and the Bishop is thinking of transferring Athelstan to Oxford. And who is better suited to solve these mysteries than Brother Athelstan, parish priest and secretarius to Sir John Cranston, the King's Coroner for the City of London! Naturally, pressure is applied from the Crown, in the form of the Regent, John of Gaunt, to have the killings stopped and (most important to John) to get the silver back. These murders are always accompanied by a riddle, the solution of which, as the good friar knows, will reveal the murderer. Athelstan knows there is a connection between the killings and the theft. And problems appear to come in threes, as his own parishioners, Pike the ditcher, Watkin the dung collector, and Huddle the painter, have found a crucifix that bleeds, indeed a miracle, and they put forth efforts to cash in on its possibilities. Athelstan, knowing his congregation, doubts its authenticity.Read more ›
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
With the death of Edward Chapler and others, only Brother Athelstan, with his sharp wit and brain, could come to the ultimate conclusion. Sir John Cranston is no slouch either, and in his own indomitable way, is the bow to Athelstan arrow. The perpetrator of the crimes will be a surprise. These books may be written to a formula however, I have read nine of them and enjoyed all immensely.
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Format: Hardcover
It's no riddle as to whether the seventh--and possibly final--episode of Paul Harding's "The Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan" is an exciting read or not. It is! In "The Assassin's Riddle," Harding continues the escapades, adventures, and good deeds of Brother Athelstan, the Dominican friar of St. Erconwald's parish in Southwark in fourteenth century London. Harding forwards his usual cast of characters in this medieval mystery and, once again, we find them abroil in yet another set of mysteries. Someone is killing off the clerks at the Chancery of the Green Wax; someone has stolen a fortune in silver from the Crown, committing murder at the same time; there has appeared a holy mystery at the church: a crucifix that bleeds; and the Bishop is thinking of transferring Athelstan to Oxford. And who is better suited to solve these mysteries than Brother Athelstan, parish priest and secretarius to Sir John Cranston, the King's Coroner for the City of London! Naturally, pressure is applied from the Crown, in the form of the Regent, John of Gaunt, to have the killings stopped and (most important to John) to get the silver back. These murders are always accompanied by a riddle, the solution of which, as the good friar knows, will reveal the murderer...The relationship between Athelstan, who loves riddles and other cerebral conundrums, is the alter ego of Sir John, whom Harding describes as a man who loves "his wife, his twin sons, his dogs, and especially this gentle friar with the sharp brain and dry sense of humor." As Cranston tells his wife, "I can number my friends on one hand and still have enough fingers left to make a rude gesture at the Regent. Athelstan's my friend." And it is this relationship that is one of the major attributes of Harding's series.Read more ›
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The scene setting is, as usual, excellent, with great depth and character painting the streets of medieval London in full colour. The story is subtle and winding, leading you down dead ends and dark alleyways.
I would recommend this book to lovers of traditional murder mysteries of all ages
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As with all the books I have read in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelston Series this is a well written, amusing and entertaining book. I would have no hesitation in recommending it to others who, like myself, enjoy historical fiction for relaxation rather than information!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
All Paul Doherty books are well written and move through the plot at a good pace, and this is no exception. I enjoyed this book, and even enjoyed being slightly irritated by the 'Coroner' Sir John. Doherty has built a purposely flawed, but loveable character there; it is nice to find heroes who are not perfect.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Paul Doherty, Brother Athelstan, wonderful history of Southwark and London and of the people that he tries to lead to a better way of life, could not put the book down till i finished the last page a very exciting and eventful novel.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Doherty's stories are full of atmosphere and provide a vivid picture of London in the 12th century. But he is so prolific as a writer that he falls into a repetitive pattern with the behavior of his character's becoming so predictable that the result is a bit of boredom.
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