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Aspects of the Novel by [Forster, E. M.]
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Aspects of the Novel Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Length: 194 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

Book Description

A volume of literary criticism from E. M. Forster, author of "A Room With a View", "A Passage to India", "Maurice" and "Howards End".

Synopsis

A volume of the novelist's literary criticism, first published in 1972, originally a course of Clark Lectures at Cambridge.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 423 KB
  • Print Length: 194 pages
  • Publisher: RosettaBooks (28 Jun. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003XREL84
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #822,808 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have loved this personal, shrewd and thoughtful trip through Eng Lit's novels since I was a student (nearly 60 years ago).
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A must read and think about for any aspiring writer.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It arrived on time and as described
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Format: Paperback
After dazzling me with his wonderful novels, I read this critical work by Forster and it gave me a much clearer idea of some of the notions behind his own methods of writing as well as those of other twentieth-century novelists. He explains the need to create an aesthetic view of the universe when writing a novel, as logic and reality are not as important within literature as stylistic effect. He demonstrates this concept most clearly in A Passage to India where truth is so distorted that everyday objects are miraculously deified and Eastern mysticism is often undermined. He further illustrates the role of truth in fiction, whether through believable or unbelievable characterisation, or through use of artistic or journalistic language.
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Format: Paperback
To the aspiring novelist this work is as relevant today as it was in the 1920's when first published. I used it consistently when lecturing on Creative Writing in the USA in the late 1980's and found it to be a worm hole to a literary fourth dimension, where abides an endless seam of characters, storylines and plotting directions. Being the descendent of a military family who served in India through the 19th and early 20th Centuries, Forster's novel "A Passage to India" proves, to me at least, the magical presence of the storyteller in the bazaar, whilst "Aspects of the Novel" provides the literary blueprint for such an elegant creation.
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Format: Paperback
Pellucid prose and complete clarity of purpose. Erudite and persuasive. An entertaining and illuminating read about the art and craft of writing fiction.
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Format: Paperback
This book is based on lectures Forster delivered in 1927, but it still felt (to me) very relevant and useful today, as well as being often amusing and thought-provoking. His approach avoids the standard `history and development' of the novel, concentrating instead on how novels work practically.

Some of the key concepts are ones he was (I think) the first to articulate. He formulates the distinction between the `story' (the sequence of events, where we ask `what will happen next?') and the `plot' (the events linked by causality, where we ask `why?'). He disputes with Aristotle (emotion isn't only in action, but in our internal secret lives, to which the novelist has access). He demonstrates the difference between flat characters (unchanging and `constructed round a single idea' like Mrs Macawber's loyalty to her husband) and round ones (`capable of surprising in a convincing way'). He looks at how characters are different from real people (they spend most time loving and desiring rather than eating and sleeping!). How points of view (omniscient, free indirect) can be mixed and matched. How novelists persuade us to accept the fantastic (whether in terms of coincidences or angels). How patterns work (the structuring of the plot and of symbols). And what the future of the novel might be (when individuals, through social and personal change, start to look at themselves in a new way, novels, he claims, will find new ways of representing things).

The style is witty and full of nice lines. `[The pseudo-scholar] loves mentioning genius, because the sound of the word exempts him from discovering its meaning.' `Speculations... always have a large air about them, they are a convenient way of being helpful or impressive.
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Format: Paperback
The book which started as a series of lectures grew to become one of landmarks in history of literary criticism. Over eighty years after its original publication its value has not diminished. Quite on the contrary, Forster's lucid and rational approach to literature seem to become even more valuable with the publication of almost every book on literary criticism largely regardless of their authors theoretical agendas.
A quarter of a century after the novel was recognised as literature (before Henry James' "The Art of Fiction" only poetry and drama deserved the name) and in the peak period of the modernism (this book was written exactly between the publications of "Ulysses" and "Finnegans Wake") Forster presented his personal view of fiction in a quiet and unassuming but clear and rational way. The resulting book is fairly unrevolutionary for the period of turmoil and change but it has stood the test of time at least as well as the modern experiments.
"Aspects of the Novel" is one of the books which keep the readers repeating to themselves: "But I know this!" Yes, you do. But it was E. M. Forster who said it first.
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