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The Art of Forgetting: Disgrace and Oblivion in Roman Political Culture (Studies in the History of Greece and Rome) by [Flower, Harriet I.]
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The Art of Forgetting: Disgrace and Oblivion in Roman Political Culture (Studies in the History of Greece and Rome) Kindle Edition

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Length: 424 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

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Review

"Flower's writing style is accessible and the examples she cites are interesting enough to take the reader on the curious journey into an unfamiliar aspect of the ancient mind."--"United Nations of Roma Victrix"

Synopsis

Elite Romans periodically chose to limit or destroy the memory of a leading citizen who was deemed an unworthy member of the community. Sanctions against memory could lead to the removal or mutilation of portraits and public inscriptions. Harriet Flower provides the first chronological overview of the development of this Roman practice - an instruction to forget - from archaic times into the second century C.E. Early memory sanctions were employed by political families in an effort to preserve their social standing or limit the embarrassment caused by a disgraced relative. Bans in the Late Republic, however, turned into punitive measures used against political rivals. By the imperial period, emperors imposed postmortem disgrace in attempts to control elite dissent or its image, but they could also become subject to such posthumous sanctions themselves. Flower explores Roman memory sanctions against the background of Greek and Hellenistic cultural influence and in the context of the wider Mediterranean world. Combining literary and legal texts, art and archaeology, this richly illustrated study provides a deeper understanding of Roman political culture.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 6936 KB
  • Print Length: 424 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (1 Feb. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006SLR7GK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,686,077 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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on 8 January 2012
Format: Paperback
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Amazon.com: 0.0 out of 5 stars 0 reviews
4.0 out of 5 starsUse of punitive memory sanctions in ancient Rome
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