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The Art Of Comic-Book Inking 2nd Edition Paperback – 27 Dec 2005

4.8 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Paperback, 27 Dec 2005
£138.13 £83.98
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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse; 2nd edition edition (27 Dec. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593074050
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593074050
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 1.8 x 27.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 539,257 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Reviewer: An amateur penciller in the United Kingdom.

Gary Martin says two very important things about his intended audience. The first is:
"...The Art of Comic-Book Inking is mainly intended for -
People who want to become inkers
Working inkers who haven't had professional training
Pencillers who want their work to be more inker-friendly
The majority of editors working in comics today"

and the second is: "BEFORE YOU START - Learn to Draw!".

Well. Out of all that lot, I can just about claim to be able to draw 'a little'. Wanting to start inking some of my own work, I thought I'd take the risk and spend some money.

The Art of Comic Book Inking is divided into three sections.
The first 70 or so pages are concerned with the basics of inking. There are notes on equipment, inking with pen and with brush, shading, feathering and cross-hatching, contouring - that is, edging an element of the picture to help define it in some way - facial shadows, backgrounds and basic textures - fire, water, earth, wood, metal and vegetation. Short sections, sometimes, but they left me with plenty to think about.

The next 120 pages I found very interesting. With the assistance of some thirty-four other inkers, Gary Martin provides examples of how a piece of work may be approached and developed.
Based on one of eight finished pencil pieces and one incomplete layout, at least four inkers per pencil piece provide examples of their work and each inker has supplied some sort of commentary. I thought that while not every contributor gave technical detail in their write-ups - a consistency I would have welcomed - their contributions gave a wide range of information about both the trade and the skill of inking.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is brilliant! Has so many different examples of artists different ways and techniques of inking...also the section with the art boards at the back is very useful as you can then put into practice what has been learned through the book, overall very useful for trying new techniques and reference
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By Parka HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 5 April 2009
Format: Paperback
Length: 0:19 Mins
In the foreword, Gary Martin says The Art of Comic-Book Inking is intended for

* people who want to become inkers
* working inkers who haven't had professional training
* pencillers who want their work to be more inker-friendly
* the majority of editors working in comics today

This isn't a step-by-step tutorial book but more of a guide book showing the different impact a drawing create with different inking styles.

There are lots of industry tips in each chapters, like how to create the illusion of depth, fix composition, add realistic backgrounds, prevent backaches etc. There are also professional tips on handling assignments in the real world, stuff like how best to communicate with editors (which is to always tell the truth).

Plenty of real world examples are included. A point to note is there's no instructions on how to specifically create the different lines, like applying pressure at different points to get a thin-thick-thin stroke. Only the end results are shown. So this book is really about the reader going about with his own experimentation and discovering his/her own technique.

Towards the back are 10 comic panels where different guest inkers are invited to ink their version of how they should look. They also talk about the equipment they use, their work flow, considerations they used to interpret the panels and personal tips.

Finally at the back of the book are 8 inking boards where they can be photocopied to be used for practice.

The table of contents:

* Before You Start
* Getting Started
* Line Weight
* Contour Lines
* Spotting Blacks
* Feathering
* Crosshatching
* Establishing Your Style
* Facial-Shadow Guide
* Inking Backgrounds
* Advanced Techniques
* Cartoon Inking
* Texture Reference Guide
* Practical Tips
* Secrets of the Stars
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Format: Paperback
To start with, I'm a small press comic book artist with a couple of published stories but with little grasp on the techniques of inking. Before I bought this book I was just simply outlinking and guessing where I thought the lines should go. My inking was, in short, dreadful.
This book goes through the basics of inking with insights and thoughts on what to do and what not to do and shows how each inker will have their own style. Techniques are broken down and explained, with a view to not getting you to copy line for line, but to encourage you to develop your own style.
Finally a nice feature of this book is the pencil pull-outs at the back which you can ink over. These are the same images used to display the differences in each professional's inking style.
I found after this book I'm still not an expert inker, but it's given me pleanty to think about and practice.
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