Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £14.99

Save £4.00 (21%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Arduino for Beginners: Essential Skills Every Maker Needs by [Baichtal, John]
Kindle App Ad

Arduino for Beginners: Essential Skills Every Maker Needs Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£14.99

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

About the Author

John Baichtal got his start writing blog posts for Wired’s legendary GeekDad blog as well as the DIYer’s bible MAKE Magazine. From there, he branched out into authoring books about toys, tools, robots, and hobby electronics. He is the co-author of The Cult of LEGO (No Starch) and author of Hack This: 24 Incredible Hackerspace Projects from the DIY Movement as well as Basic Robot Building with LEGO Mindstorm’s NXT 2.0 (both from Que). Most recently he wrote Make: LEGO and Arduino Projects for MAKE, collaborating with Adam Wolf and Matthew Beckler. He lives in Minneapolis, MN, with his wife and three children.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 149341 KB
  • Print Length: 385 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 5 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Que Publishing; 1 edition (22 Nov. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00GUJZ0RS
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #909,014 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If the author says, "get the code from the accompanying website", then the least you would expect is that the code would be there. It wasn't. And that meant lots of laborious typing. What a let-down!
Some things are not explained at all - like what to do with libraries. The examples give a good starting point, but don't expect projects to work without some further research on your part. This book is not for people who give up easily!
On the positive side, the book does contain a wealth of general information useful to the beginner.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Brilliant, very good Information for starters giving you an idea of what the arduino can do.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great thnx
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars 7 reviews
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This book is not for "beginners" 15 Feb. 2014
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The "beginner" in the book's title are not the typical school children who wants to learn Arduino or parents who want to teach them. Many projects described here use large and expensive machines. For example, a project in chapter 2 uses a computer controlled laser cutter to make an enclosure, which can be bought here on Amazon for about $13,000 and can take half of a garage. For sure a DIYer can find alternative ways to do things, but then the descriptions of the book is rather wasted. On the other hand, if you have the aspiration and resources to become a professional "Maker", this book can introduce you to all those wonderful machines so you can create your own shop.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Introduction to the Ardunio Uno 30 Oct. 2015
By Bob Monroe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
There are many people like myself who are not electrical engineers or computer science graduates but we still enjoy many of the same pleasures. We like to take things apart, try and build new things (or attempt to) and learning how things work. You might call us hobbyist, hackers, or makers but there are lots of folks like myself out there. Most of us fail in our first of twelfth attempt but we learn because failure doesn’t matter as much as trying.

Two years ago my youngest daughter asked me to help her build a robot. I’m a cyber security guy so I don’t know a thing about making robots. I shrug her off and go about my merry way (yeah, I know I should have spent time with her learning to build a robot. I’m a lousy dad). Over those two years, I got into microcomputers such as the Raspberry Pi, the Beagle Bone Board, Radxa Rock Pro, Banana Pi Pro, plus all kinds of IoT sensors.

Somehow I managed to pick up an Ardiuno Yun and wrote a review that basically called the device a bipolar SoC (System on a Chip) because it has two different processors on the board. One processor is designed to work with Arduino projects that the other chip works with Linux as a wireless interface. For starters, each microcomputers has its own personality. The Pi is from the UK so it spells lots of common American words wrong. The Beagle Bone Board is made by Texas Instruments so it is beefed up. The Arduino is an Italian product with its own programming language.

The book Arduino for Beginners by the very busy John Baichtal is an exciting and fun entry into the world of Arduino microcontrollers. To be exact, most of the material is focused on the Arduino Uno which is the most generic of all the Arduino products.

At 375 pages, the author starts the reader off with a simple introduction to basic electronics. I needed the refresher because high school was a long, long time ago for me. This first chapter is named Arduino Cram Session because it stuffs lots of information about basic electronic components into a well-crafted chapter. Throughout the book, Lego Master Baichtal gives the reader plenty of information about each piece he uses, why he uses that part and where you can find that exact same part. This is a huge help since Radio Shack has closed up almost all of their stores.

Pretty much any programming book out there starts the reader off with the simple task of creating a code that says “Hello World”. The same concept goes for electronic books except that all want you to start off by making a LED light blink. Both are designed to ease the reader into a basic step and build on that step for increasingly complex projects. One of the issues I see here is that the author takes the reader into some big steps rather quickly. Normally this wouldn’t be a problem but microcontrollers like the Arduino require wiring, writing code and adding several electrical parts together. This quickly become a daunting task for new users. I hate coding.

Just as I started to regret getting this book Mr. Baichtal throws several bonus features at the reader such as 3D printers, fabrication techniques, tools of the trade and even an introduction to soldering. The chapter on soldering is terrific as are the close up pictures. There is no shortage of really nice pictures to show the reader what things look like up close. Oh, don’t forget the magnifying glass because these are called “micro” for a reason.

The book is filled with some really cool projects however the purpose of the projects is to show you what the Arduino is capable of and what you are capable of. For us nonprogrammers, the source codes are written out and available for download from the author’s site. I had lots of fun reading this book and will be using many of these projects for next year’s Halloween. If you just want a book on basic electrical parts, breadboarding or coding this is a perfect book for you. Add the bonus of learning how to build your own laser tag system and you’ve spent money on a great piece of literature.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easily Understood Introduction 16 Jan. 2014
By S. P. Bolton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book generates more enthusiasm for Arduino, as it takes you through the basics step by step and assumes virtually no previous knowledge.
Highly recommended.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars too many photos, general info, not many projects. 16 Mar. 2014
By Moshe Zohar - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
too many photos, general info, not many projects.
need to add projects and electric- electronic drawing. not only breadboard drawing.
5.0 out of 5 stars this a great book gives more details about every chapter 26 Feb. 2016
By Martin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
this a great book gives more details about every chapter
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know
click to open popover