Archangel Audio Download – Unabridged

3.9 out of 5 stars 166 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Download, Unabridged, 1 Feb 2010

This title is not available for you.

Sorry, this title is no longer available. Please try using the search feature as another version of this work may be available. If you think we've made a mistake, please contact Audible Customer Care at 0800 496 2279.


Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 11 hours and 54 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: AudioGO Ltd.
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 1 Feb. 2010
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0038353NK

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I don't generally read bestseller popular fiction but have been very impressed with this book and his other, first novel, Fatherland. It's not just that he tells a cracking tale but he has some interesting ideas and the quality of his writing is good, not too pulpy.
Harris paints a compelling portrait of modern Russia, particularly Moscow but at the same time introduces some fascinating theories and ideas about the political direction Russia is taking and the burden of the past it drags behind it. The result is that you are simultaneously gripped by an exciting piece of fiction but also slightly horrified at how true to life much of this could be.
Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed Archangel. Having previously studied Communist Russia, I recognised many of the political figures featured in the book, but am now looking forward to reading even more about the subject.
That said, you don't need any knowledge of the subject to enjoy this book (though concentrating on the many Russian names is vital!). As with Harris' other excellent thriller Fatherland, I found myself instantly empathising with the characters of Archangel, namely 'maverick' academic Fluke Kelso (in Moscow to attend a conference about the newly opened Soviet archives), and desperately willed him on in his quest to find out whether Stalin's secret notebook does indeed exist.
However, Harris cleverly shows the many sides to the effects of Kelso's investigations, and also draws a sympathetic picture of the long-suffering Russian police chief Suvorin, who too suspects there are many secrets buried in Russia's history but knows unearthing them may have a much greater impact than that of a 'scoop'.
As the plot moved on I was compelled to rush through the always evocative descriptions of 'New Russia' to get to its conclusion. Archangel is exciting, fast-paced, eerie as well as sad. A fantastic book.
Comment 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Archangel tells the story of a historian called Fluke Kelso who is told of the existence of a secret notebook belonging to Josef Stalin, and then in true Indiana Jones style becomes determined to find the evidence. Led into the frozen forests of Russia, the narrative provides Kelso with something more shocking than even he imagined. Having read the other reviews, I wouldn’t agree that the end of the book was all that weak but certainly agree it’s a well-paced and has a fair few twists to keep the reader enthralled.
Robert Harris has also written Enigma (recently made into a blockbuster film) and Fatherland (a fantastic alternative history about a murder investigation in post-war Germany, where the war was won by Germany). All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed this book – an original idea written really well. Probably not the best book Harris has written in my view (hint: read Fatherland), but definitely worth reading.
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Fluke Kelso is in Moscow to attend a conference on the recently opened Soviet archives. He is a Oxford historian and Mr Harris's novel tells the story of four days in Kelso's life which starts one night when a former NKVD officer visits him in his hotel room. He claims to have been the bodyguard of Lavrenty Beria who was at the time the chief of the secret police just before Stalin's death. According to him, he witnessed Stalin's death when he had his fatal stroke and he also saw Beria steal his papers among which was a black notebook.
The following day, Kelso decides to verify the man's story at the Lenin Library. At this point he doesn't know that his enquiry is the beginning of a breathless chase from Moscow to the port of Archangel located on the White Sea in order to unveil Stalin's last secret which has been hidden for nearly fifty years.
Good suspense, plenty of action and an interesting historical background are qualities in this novel which place Robert Harris at the same level as writers like John Buchan, John LeCarré and Len Deighton.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Harris's third history based novel, following Fatherland and Enigma is set in a modern day Russian struggling to come to terms with capatilist reforms. Harris' hero is Fluke Kelso, a somewhat down at heel Russian history expert. Fluke stumbles across some secret papers said to be a diary kept by Joseph Stalin himself. This startling find leads Fluke to the northern Russian city of Archangel and sets him face to face with an area of Russian history he had thought long since dead.
Fans of Harris' previous novels will enjoy this one, with it's well written insight into the recent past coupled with a enjoyable thriller. But personally, although I enjoyed the book I found the ending rather weak ( a reoccurance from the other novels) - the shocks weren't that shocking and the final twists and turns weren't really very exciting. The build up is well paced but the ending lacks that punch which makes a very good (four or five stars) thriller.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed Archangel, Fluke Kelso proves a believeable flawed main protagonist. Nice not to have a swashbuckling, gun toting bodybuilder at the centre of the story.

The main plot is handled extremely well, and really makes the reader buy into the plausibility of what unfolds.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category