FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Apollinaire in the Great ... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Ex_Libris2015
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Unread copy in good condition. All our items are ex-bookshop stock and have not been previously owned but may have some shelf wear, including small tears, cuts and dents to the cover and pages. Daily despatch, 2-4 days for delivery within UK.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Apollinaire in the Great War, 1914-18 Paperback – 22 Jan 2015

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.99
£6.56 £5.35
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£14.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Peter Owen Publishers (22 Jan. 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0720616018
  • ISBN-13: 978-0720616019
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 497,984 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Hunter's book is an engrossing combination of military history, biography and cultural analysis that offers a lucid portrait of an artist in both love and war. --Independent

About the Author

DAVID HUNTER is a graduate in French and History from Oxford University. He works as a freelance writer and researcher and has written two books. Each year he joins a group of scholars and enthusiasts in Paris on the anniversary of Apollinaire's death in order to commemorate him and celebrate his poetry. He is also a board member of The Rimbaud and Verlaine Foundation, recently established in London.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
When I think of the poetry of World War One, I think of Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Robert Graves—but the English, obviously, weren’t the only ones writing about their wartime experiences. The French poet Guillaume Apollinaire spent time in the trenches, too, an often-overlooked aspect of his life. Now David Hunter has written about Apollinaire’s experiences in the Great War, examining his personal life and writings in this richly detailed biography.

Apollinaire—Wilhelm de Kostrowitzky at birth—was a fascinating character, born of a freewheeling mother and unknown father. He never stayed too long in any one place growing up, but came to call Paris home. By the outbreak of the Great War, he was lauded in literary circles for his poetry and art criticism (he was an early champion of cubism), and was good friends with many in the avant-garde movement, such as Picasso.

In the late summer of 1914, he was swept up in the moment as war loomed, and volunteered to serve in the French armed forces—not an easy task, it turned out, since he wasn’t a French citizen. But eventually he made it in, first serving in an artillery unit far behind the front lines, full of what now seems like misplaced enthusiasm for the war against “the Huns,” before heading to the trenches.

Hunter follows Apollinaire’s life—and loves—during the war, often through his poetry. Apollinaire is explicit about his desires in his letters—and over the course of the war points his passion to three women, the worldly Louise de Colignye-Chatillon, the young and naïve Madeleine Pages, and his eventual wife, Jacqueline Kolb. Even in the trenches, Apollinaire continued to write, and his war poems sometimes take on radical forms—visual art with words.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x88489744) out of 5 stars 1 review
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x88675900) out of 5 stars Poet at the Front 15 Jun. 2015
By Taylor McNeil - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I think of the poetry of World War One, I think of Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Robert Graves—but the English, obviously, weren’t the only ones writing about their wartime experiences. The French poet Guillaume Apollinaire spent time in the trenches, too, an often-overlooked aspect of his life. Now David Hunter has written about Apollinaire’s experiences in the Great War, examining his personal life and writings in this richly detailed biography.

Apollinaire—Wilhelm de Kostrowitzky at birth—was a fascinating character, born of a freewheeling mother and unknown father. He never stayed too long in any one place growing up, but came to call Paris home. By the outbreak of the Great War, he was lauded in literary circles for his poetry and art criticism (he was an early champion of cubism), and was good friends with many in the avant-garde movement, such as Picasso.

In the late summer of 1914, he was swept up in the moment as war loomed, and volunteered to serve in the French armed forces—not an easy task, it turned out, since he wasn’t a French citizen. But eventually he made it in, first serving in an artillery unit far behind the front lines, full of what now seems like misplaced enthusiasm for the war against “the Huns,” before heading to the trenches.

Hunter follows Apollinaire’s life—and loves—during the war, often through his poetry. Apollinaire is explicit about his desires in his letters—and over the course of the war points his passion to three women, the worldly Louise de Colignye-Chatillon, the young and naïve Madeleine Pages, and his eventual wife, Jacqueline Kolb. Even in the trenches, Apollinaire continued to write, and his war poems sometimes take on radical forms—visual art with words.

Although initially a war booster, once at the front lines, he’s appalled by the horror of the situation, and his poems reflect that reality. Hunter analyzes the poetry with care, and helps us appreciate Apollinaire’s aims. He received a head wound in 1916, which he never fully recovered from, and was in Paris as the war ended, writing feverishly (plays, poetry, criticism—coining the term surrealism). But like millions of others, he succumbed to the deadly Spanish influenza that swept the world in the fall of 1918, only 38 years old.

Hunter is a sympathetic biographer and confident literary critic, and brings Apollinaire vividly to life in this slender volume. Highly recommended.
Was this review helpful? Let us know


Feedback