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Anthem Audiobook – Unabridged

4.3 out of 5 stars 145 customer reviews

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Audio Download, Unabridged, 15 Feb 2011
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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 1 hour and 47 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: ABN
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 15 Feb. 2011
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004NUCHHW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Gabriel27 on 25 April 2017
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Even though at times the monologues came across as a bit theatrical, it rendered the message Rand was trying to convey no less powerful.
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Format: Paperback
Anthem sits quite nicely with other dystopian books that pit the individual against a collectivist state such as Yevgeny Zamyatin's We and George Orwell's 1984. In common with those other novels the central character becomes self aware and finds love with a woman. Love being the emotion felt by one individual for another that is neither shared with the collective nor has any utility that could benefit the collectivist state (as such love is disparaged by the state in all 3 of these novels). The other common theme between these 3 stories is that the central character feels the need to reject the society in which they live. However, what separates Anthem from the others is that it is a simple story of an awakening self. The other two show what is at stake by destroying the central character by pitting them against an all powerful all conquering state. We and 1984 show the consequence of allowing the state to be truly totalitarian. The state in Anthem however, is rather pathetic in compassion; it is all too easy for Equality 7-2521 to run away. The state threatens but it only succeeds in its threats if the victim is somewhat complicit in their own punishment. Equality 7-2521 has it too easy. This does not mean that Anthem is in any way second rate in comparison to We and 1984, only that it explores the idea of what is good about individual by arguing that real joy comes from individual achievement or through feelings that cannot be shared equally amongst all men. You might perhaps be tempted to think that the novel promotes selfish pride as a virtue and this is true to an extent, however the novel is intended to be a simple hymn to the self and does not concern it itself with perils of a totalitarian state in the way that We and 1984 do. Anthem is just the unashamed enjoyment of a cog in a state machine realising their own individuality and nothing more.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I must admit that with this book I found the writing style a little difficult to understand at first.

However, once I grasped the concept of using the collective 'we' rather than ever using the word 'I' I began to enjoy the storyline.

One thing I liked about this book is that the story was simplistic. Maybe Ayn Rand kept the storyline simple because she guessed people may have trouble getting the writing style around their heads but by the end of the book, looking back on all the events that happened, everything made sense.

I personally have never read a classic novel like this one before and found it quite enjoyable by the end. I am still going to stick to my favourite genres (Dystopian, Young Adult, etc) but this was a nice change from the usual books that I read.

I would highly recommend this book if you're looking for a little break or a pleasant change in your normal reading style!
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Format: Paperback
Reasons to read this? File alongside "Brave New World" and "1984", as all three texts were written within 20 years of each other. In this dystopia, singular personal pronouns are banned and personal freedom, space and liberty are anathema to the people of the future. The narrator makes a positive discovery and there is promise of better to come. Rand comments on the power of language to change and shape society; a prescient point given today's circumstances.
In this allegory, Rand appears to criticise collectivism and she has been accused of being fascist. I'm not sure. Rand was a refugee who fled the Soviet Union; just because she criticises communism, does that make her automatically the polar opposite? Huxley is critical of society in his book and Orwell, the arch-socialist, is critical of collectivism in his text. The power of the individual is a staple of our culture and forms the basis of much SF; from "Star Trek" to "Dr Who", from H.G. Wells to Iain M. Banks, the individual is celebrated and collectivism frowned on, be it through the daleks or the dark side or some evil empire; you get the picture. This is an important story for two reasons: a) it is an example of timeless SF and b) it introduces us to objectivism.
It is also very short. A recommended read, then, whether or not you subscribe to Rand's philosophy.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought this alongside Atlas Shrugs for my daughter to take with her to Uni, she loves it. Rand's writings warning of the dangers of all kinds of collectivism are as valid today as they were in the wake of the communist take over of Russia more so as they collectivists never went away after the fall of the Berlin wall and the liberation of eastern EUrope. They merely rebranded themselves as socialists and social "democrats" and greens and environmentalists.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
why bother now one every reads this rubbish anyway???? it is repetitive crap all the awy to the other end of the line
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Format: Kindle Edition
This was my first Ayn Rand novel, and I wasn't sure how I'd like it, having previously seen The Fountainhead as a movie, and found it powerful but quite opaque.

However one sees the world; power to the individual or power to the state, the story is engrossing, a journey of redemption for a man whose only sin is to be different.

It follows the life of young Equality 7-2521, who, like all others in his world, speaks of himself in the third person plural. He is exceptionally observant and slyly witty.
He is also an inventor who challenges the status quo not only with his ideas but also his extreme height. At six feet he is literally a victim of the 'tall poppy' syndrome, and is punished for standing out.

As in the best dystopian stories, there is light, and possibly love in the gloom... but I'll say no more of the plot...

The thing which made this book so gripping for me was the beautiful way it was written. I found the voice so poetic and clues to his transformation were given as much in the language as the story.

Highly recommended, if only to sample this legendary author and see what the fuss is about.
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