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La Antena [2007] [DVD]

3.5 out of 5 stars 49 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Valeria Bertuccelli, Alejandro Urdapilleta, Julieta Cardinali, Rafael Ferro, Florencia Raggi
  • Directors: Esteban Sapir
  • Format: PAL, Surround Sound
  • Language: Spanish
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Dogwoof
  • DVD Release Date: 18 Aug. 2008
  • Run Time: 98 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001AQ2BZK
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 84,881 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

An entire city has lost its voice. Mr. TV, the owner of the city s only television channel, is carrying out a sinister, secret plan to subject all of the city s inhabitants to his will forever more. La Antena is a visually stunning, black and white, near silent sci-fi film. Mysterious and haunting, with echoes of Tim Burton and Terry Gilliam, it is one of the cult hits of the year. **** 'Fabulous' Evening Standard; **** Overpoweringly exquisite... Fritz Lang meets Tim Burton Metro; **** Mail on Sunday; **** completely enchanting Sunday Telegraph; **** Sunday Times; The movie is a tour de force Observer; A refreshing one-off Guardian; The missing link between the films of Jean Cocteau, David Lynch and Michel Gondry... thrilling and enthralling Independent; **** Times; **** Unlike anything else you will see all year Film Review; Every now and then, a knockout film comes along that reaffirms your faith in all things cinematic. Here's one such flick FILM OF THE MONTH Bizarre

Review

***** Unmissable --Empire

This is a full-on experience, a 98-minute sweep through cinematic history, breathtaking in its audacity and imagination --Sight & Sound

The kind of surreal treat you might get if Terry Gilliam collaborated with Davids Lynch and Cronenberg... Wonderful. --Independent on Sunday

This is a full-on experience, a 98-minute sweep through cinematic history, breathtaking in its audacity and imagination --Sight & Sound

The kind of surreal treat you might get if Terry Gilliam collaborated with Davids Lynch and Cronenberg... Wonderful. --Independent on Sunday

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
This film is remarkable. What the creators have done is to recreate a silent film and appear to only use the visual trickery that was available in the 1920s. The absence of people speaking mean that we concentrate more on the visuals. The physical incorporation of the words being spoken by the actors into the film is a work of genius.

This film demonstrates that the black and white silent film is far from redundant medium.

The production design of 1920/30s futurism is a visual treat.

I do hope this inspires other people to produce more films of this type. It is a visual work of art.

The plot? A TV company has electronically removed everyone's ability to speak, and thus predominates. Our hero and his family must battle to stop this.

This film was made in Argentina and this does appear to be allegorical to the period of dictatorship that this unfortunate country had to endure.

However the parallels are not blindingly obvious to anyone unacquainted with Argentine history so the film is therefore highly entertaining without preaching.

The inspiration for the film would appear to have been Lang's Metropolis, but it is by no means a rip-off, although there is a homage to Rotwang's robotisation of Maria.

Even if B&W silents are not your thing, give this a try for the visuals and design.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Stylistically inspired first and foremost
by Dziga Vertov's "Man with a Movie Camera" (1929)
Michael Nyman's - Man with a Movie Camera [DVD]
and Fritz Lang's "Metropolis" (1927), Argentinian director Esteban Sapir
weaves a highly political parable about the enslaving, dehumanizing
influence of Television. Controlled by a villainous media magnate,
TV has been used to steal the vigor and the voices of the people.
The raw material of the human intellect is mashed into fast food,
which is the only food that these people consume.
In the final stage of the enslavement, the media magnate wants to
steal the very means of forming thoughts and resisting,
i.e. the words/concepts themselves.
The conflict of the resisting heroes with the media baron and his
murderous minions is cast in early 20th Century iconography:
While the media baron and his evil scientist are associated with the
Swastika, the forces of liberation are associated with the Star of David,
and the emblems of the Soviet Union.
I agree with other reviewers about the references to the brutal
Argentinian dictatorship, but the film's message is universal.
Image quality of the DVD is not impressive, but effective,
as it is supposed to simulate the flickering image of the silents.
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Format: DVD
Since my most passionate interests include silent film, German expressionism, chamber music, and Argentine Tango this film could have been tailor made for me hence it gets top marks in my subjective view. It's an extremely competent piece of film making which can be appreciated on many levels and contains a wealth of details, observations and references. The film itself is copiously reviewed elsewhere so I'll limit this review to a few observations I haven't seen elsewhere and on the releases available.

The music in this film is paricularly well crafted and integrated with the onscreen action. It is very much influenced by Argentine tango and in places the on screen action is almost choreographed as if a tango (for example the way the heroine kicks up her leg backwards during the embrace on arrival at the antena is a movement straight out of an Argentine tango).

I'm also fascinated by the masked "ratman" character. He's appears to be part rat, part human (eg. has a tail, and rat's teeth but human hands and can drive, fire a gun etc.). What was his history? Was he the result of a failed former experiment by Dr. Y? Or with his military medals is he perhaps just a metaphor for corrupt military power in former Argentinian dictatorships? There is so much to speculate on in this film...

The German edition of the DVD release although not having English subtitles also includes a making of documentary, some deleted scenes and an alternate ending. I think the alternative ending is not as effecticve as the one which was used in the final film but it's a shame the deleted scenes were not kept in since they make the plot far easier to follow and their inclusion wouldn't have made the film excessively long (this film seems to be over too fast as it is in my book!).
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By Paul B VINE VOICE on 17 Sept. 2008
Format: DVD Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Hollywood has many ideas, most of them recycled. La Antena is not one of these but it certainly plays on the subject.

What it does is different from any other movie, but it uses the oldest form of film to do it in, the black and white silent movie. The film itself does have music, but dialogue is subtitled, for good reason. The people in the story have had their voices taken away. Instead, they use subtitles (which they can see) notes and other means to communicate. The perpetrator of this auditory crime? A man called Mr TV, who wants to take all voice away from the people, including words.

Thinly disguised remarks on Nazi occupation, tyrannical leaders and even the state of the movie industry do not get in the way of what is a very interesting and original story. There is a race to save the one woman who can speak, The Voice, from being cruelly used by Mr TV to remove words all together. Fittingly, she is being held captive at a site with a giant Antenna, hence the title.

What La Antena does well is to re-create the sets and feel of the old silent movies, but while keeping the pace and the action fully in the 21st century. Influences of Fritz Lang and other silent movie makers are obvious, but despite it's charming homage, and party because of the effects, La Antena still feels a fresh movie, highly watchable today.

The film left an impression on me and was a breath of fresh air amongst all the movies being churned out by the film industry. I cannot give it a greater compliment than this.
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