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On Another's Man Wound Hardcover – 1 Apr 2002

4.7 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Anvil Books (Childrens Press); Revised edition edition (April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1901737365
  • ISBN-13: 978-1901737363
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 14.2 x 3.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,487,685 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

O'Malley [is] a Republican chronicler of great literary skill.--Tim Pat Coogan, Author of "The Irish Civil War" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Ernie O'Malley was born in Castlebar, County Mayo, Ireland in 1898. He was a medical student in Dublin when the Easter Rising of 1916 occurred. He then became a member of the Irish Republican Army and organized battalions and companies throughout Ireland, reporting directly to Michael Collins. He died in Dublin in 1957. He is also author of Singing Flame and Raids and Rallies. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

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By A Customer on 14 Sept. 2003
Format: Paperback
This book was a big surprise, I bought it more or less on a whim because although I read a lot of history, I very rarely read anything about my own country. This will change now as Ernie O'Malley has made me want to learn more about this much-mythologised but little-known period of Irish history - a pivotal period in Irish history, of which most people actually know very little.
Ernie O'Malley was a medical student in Trinity College when the Easter 1916 Rising took place, before this he was largely unsympathetic to Irish separatism but during the rising - seeing that people were willing to risk their lives for lofty ideals (albeit relatively few people) he changed his mind and joined the Irish Volunteers - the forerunners of the IRA.
This book is his personal account of travelling around Ireland between 1916-1921 to organise the Volunteers locally to fight against the British for an independent Irish republic. O'Malley is an incredible writer and gives a great sense of what the country was like in this era for the majority of the people who lived there and the not always 100% committed 'freedom fighters'.
His writing style is very matter-of-fact, no Bravo Two Zero style posturing or pretentious 'self-confessed war junkie' type 'confessions' a la the likes of Anthony Loyd et al. O'Malley never pulls his punches or talks up events, telling them in a very understated manner, from his torture in a Dublin prison at the hands of the British to his execution of three British officers in the countryside, this is a gripping and somewhat shocking story, beautifully written. Buy it and you won't be disappointed.
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Format: Paperback
The first instalment of Ernie O'Malley's memoirs, covering his early days as a schoolboy in Dublin (from a Protestant background) through to his role as a commander in the IRA after the Easter Rising, and ending with his capture at the hands of the British. O'Malley is an incredibly engaging author, this is especially the case where he describes the Easter Rebellion from the standpoint of onlooker. Perhaps giving one an impression of what most ordinary citizens of Dublin must have been feeling at the time (going from feelings of mild amusement, to shock and finally anger at the terrible retribution inflicted by the British forces). This is a stimulating book, that one finds hard to ignore.
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By A Customer on 13 Sept. 2003
Format: Paperback
This book was a big surprise, I bought it more or less on a whim because although I read a lot of history, I very rarely read anything about my own country. This will change now as Ernie O'Malley has made me want to learn more about this much-mythologised but little-known period of Irish history - a pivotal period in Irish history, of which most people actually know very little.
Ernie O'Malley was a medical student in Trinity College when the Easter 1916 Rising took place, before this he was largely unsympathetic to Irish seperatism but during the rising - seeing that people were willing to risk their lives for lofty ideals (albeit relatively few people) he changed his mind and joined the Irish Volunteers - the forerunners of the IRA.
This book is his personal account of travelling around Ireland between 1916-1921 to organise the Volunteers locally to fight against the British for an independent Irish republic. O'Malley is an incredible writer and gives a great sense of what the country was like in this era for the majority of the people who lived there and the not always 100% committed 'freedom fighters'.
His writing style is very matter-of-fact, no Bravo Two Zero style posturing or pretentious, self-concious 'self-confessed war junkie' type 'confessions' a la the likes of Anthony Loyd et al. O'Malley never pulls his punches or talks up events, telling them in a very understated manner, from his torture in a Dublin prison at the hands of the British to his execution of three British officers in the countryside, this is a gripping story beautifully written. Buy it and you won't be dissapointed.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Mostly today I want to tell the story of how this book arrived a fortnight early. How beautifully packed it was and posted by hand. I am in the middle of a Tan War read -fest and I was lacking this one. Interesting man this Ernie. The personalities of the fighters did not often suit each other. There was a great deal of oneupmanship, although they might not have known the word. Gotta read the book now. Thank you again, Mayo Books.
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Format: Paperback
"On another man's wound" is generally regarded as the only personal account by a War of Independence commander that has true literary merit. It is a beautifully written and gripping narrative of O'Malley's experiences from 1916 to 1921. The book is packed with incident from initial observations on the 1916 rebellion to guerrilla action in the South, to his capture in Kilkenny, subsequent torture, and his participation in the only successful escape from Kilmainham gaol in Dublin. Along the way there are interesting pen portraits of many of the leading figures of the time including Erskine Childers, Liam Lynch, and, not least, Michael Collins.

At its heart the book is a remarkably honest account of the brutalising effects of war: Towards the end O'Malley describes unflinchingly his decision to murder three captured British soldiers just before the Truce. The effect is both chilling and moving: O'Malley's literary acheivement is to show how his personal experiences are representative of all soldiers in war, which can transform idealistic youth into diminished and bloody men in a pattern that is repeated through history and across the world to this day.

As such the book retains a relevance beyond it geographic and historical contexts: It speaks a truth that should be remembered by all contemplating sending young people to kill and die on behalf of some cherished cause, particularly if the closest the decision makers have been to war is an Oxford PPE course or a London law chambers.
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