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Another Country [DVD]

4.4 out of 5 stars 53 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Rupert Everett, Colin Firth, Cary Elwes, Adrian Ross Magenty, Anna Massey
  • Directors: Marek Kanievska
  • Writers: Julian Mitchell
  • Producers: Alan Marshall, Robert Fox, Julian Seymour
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Film 4
  • DVD Release Date: 17 Mar. 2008
  • Run Time: 86 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0010LB02U
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 27,947 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Another Country tells the story of Guy Bennett (Rupert Everett) and Tommy Judd (Colin Firth), teenage friends at an elite English public school during the summer of 1931.

Clever, hedonistic and gay, Bennett is in his penultimate year of school and the future looks bright. He is convinced he will rise to the heights of his chosen career in the diplomatic service by eventually being appointed Ambassador in Paris. His best friend Judd, committed to Lenin's 'brave new world', despises such bourgeois aspirations.

Homosexuality, honesty and hypocrisy are the main themes in this coming-of-age film, based on the award winning play by Julian Mitchell.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Finally...the long-awaited UK DVD release of this classic film - which inexplicably has already been available on DVD elsewhere for several years.

For people who have not caught the film previously, a brief synopsis: 'Another Country' opens in the USSR, 1983, with an elderly Englishman, Guy Bennett, giving an interview to a journalist on why he became a Russian spy. The bulk of the film then flashes back to his schooldays at Eton in the early 1930s, where the young Bennett (handsome Rupert Everett) has a crush on another pupil (the equally-handsome Cary Elwes). Meanwhile, Bennett's best friend, Tommy Judd (Colin Firth), consistently preaches revolution and Stalinism. The two main characters, the queer and the communist, are the outsiders in this look at the schooling of the future ruling class; each facing their own conflicts and the challenge of introspection.

Part coming-of-age, part social commentary, 'Another Country' could therefore be viewed as "Tom Brown's Schooldays" meets "Maurice" meets "Dead Poets' Society", with all the now-familiar boarding school fare (authoritarian prefects, a furtive fumbling scene between pupils, corporal punishment, youthful idealism). It is curiously bland in some respects (the sexual aspects are muted and tend to favour a spiritual/Uranian love over sensuality) and to some extent may appear dated.

Nevertheless, the film's relevance remains in its insight into anti-establishmentarianism. Indeed, the writer (Julian Mitchell) envisaged the work as being only incidentally concerned with boarding schools and homosexuality; the focus was intended rather to be on the 'psychology of the traitor', expounding his belief that the makings of the 'betrayal' are not simply ideological, but are sowed at an earlier stage.
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Format: VHS Tape
Another Country, a film starring Rupert Everett and Colin Firth (in their very early work), is set in the upper-class British society of the inter-war period. Its central idea is to demonstrate the difficulties of growing up even in the midst of privilege when one is different. Everett plays Guy Bennett, an intelligent and popular student at a public school (in America, read private school) who doesn't seem to be growing out of `schoolboy tendencies' as are the others. The film is done in a flashback sequence; Bennett is in his old age, reflecting back on the origins of the troubles in his life (as it turns out, Bennett is one of the several British intelligence agents who during the Cold War defected to the Soviet Union). Bennett sees the problems starting in prep schools such as his (Eton is not specifically named, but heavily implied, particularly given the history of the real British intelligence defectors). There is an inability for the culture around to face the truth, and the attempt by the school (instructors, alumni, and fellow students alike) to pressure all into a conformity that doesn't always fit. Bennett wants to be openly homosexual; his friend Tommy Judd (Firth) wants to be a nonconformist Communist; their nemesis is not from the adult world, but rather the fellow student Fowler, who is in charge of the school's military brigade, and the one most keen on enforcing rules and mores.
This is an interesting film for British audiences because it exposes an unspoken element to the class struggle by looking inside the upper class and seeing division as opposed to monolith and uniformity.
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Format: DVD
I cant speak highly enough of this film. Everett and Firth bounce off each other with effortless charm and Rupert's dry sarcasm mixed with Firth's competent reassurance do everything possible to make this a jewel of a film, two fantastic actors and a great and stifling story of repressed homosexuality.
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Format: DVD
Rupert Everett totally steals this film as Guy Bennett (modelled on notorious Cambridge spy Guy Burgess), in the story of his attempts to pursue a relationship with another boy at his Eton-esque public school c. 1930s in the midst of complicated school politics and punishments. Colin Firth brings a terrific sense of adolescent confidence to the portrayal of Judd, Bennett's Marxist room-mate, and the rest of cast excels at capturing a spirit of tension and repression. The unconvincing scenes are all the more notable because there are so few of them. You wonder whether Judd is really necessary to the story except to give Bennett a character to bounce off. Also, the scenes of Bennett with boyfriend Harcourt seem oddly chaste. There's no implication that their relationship exists on anything more than a Uranian-esque romantic sensuality plane, which is not what one might expect from schoolboys, even if they are very sophisticated. Finally, the film is bookended by the older Bennett (Everett again with extreme makeup) discussing the relationship between his schooldays and spying in two scenes that could easily be removed without losing anything of value.

However, overall, this is a terrific film, perhaps even better than the original play. You couldn't ask for a better cast, who are on top form.
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